*Finish* Willys Jeep, Modelik Nr. 10/02, 1:25, Special Build

Discussion in 'Armory & Military' started by fuchsjos, Jun 13, 2005.

  1. fuchsjos

    fuchsjos Member

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    Report_34:

    The next logical step was to connect engine and cooler. The right distances I could read in the drawings. The lower tube was made by a piece of wire, colored in black and glued with CA glue.

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    Report_35:

    The upper tube was made with the original paperparts (two paper rolls). The last piece of the tube on way to cooler, I used a piece of cellular rubber. The cellular rubber was still elastically after gluing it with CA. So I have some play by mounting the engine into the chassis. When I looked at the pictures I was disturbed by the view of the red colored oil filler cover - it looks not good.

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    Report_36:

    The solution was easy. A little ring of paper and a punched, wet formed disk of paper were glued together and colored red. Ready was the new cap.

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    Report_37:

    The new cap glued to the oil filler - looks better.

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  2. fuchsjos

    fuchsjos Member

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    Report_37:

    As the last part to the engine, there are missing the clutch and the gear. I took the parts of the paper kit and build it officinal. The screws were done again with little punched cardboard disks. Finally I primered all with the brush.

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    Report_38:

    After this I use my airbrush and Tamiya Metall Grey, made a washing and a filtering.

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    Report_39:

    At last I 'flanged' the gear to the engine.

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    Report_40:

    There is a look from behind. For comparison only I placed a ruler - the complete motor is pretty exactly 60 mm (236o mil) long.

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  3. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    I literally cannot believe what I'm seeing; but any more than that I won't elaborate, Josef, 'cause you'll just be embarassed. I can tell that you really enjoy both making these small masterpieces and telling the story of making them in both pictures and words. So let me just share your joy and ensure you that I'm equally happy watching the progress of the work.

    What a joy this is, and what a privilege to get to view it on this site, too. Many, many thanks for taking the trouble!

    Leif

    PS. I will immediately pick up on one of the many tricks you've demonstrated that is within my ability, namely the thin soldering wire for making leads. I have been thinking about that for ignition wires of a Wright Cyclone, and also - thicker - for the tubular framework of early generation aircraft passenger chairs. Now you confirm that this is indeed the right choice. I'm off to the hardware monger's store, I am! - L.
  4. Jim Nunn

    Jim Nunn Member

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    Josef,

    Superb work!

    I am somewhat of a purest and do not like to “Paint†the paper, I do use watercolors to color the edges and weather the model. However after seeing your excellent work on the engine I think I give painting some serious consideration the engine looks better painted then it would with just the printing.

    Jim Nunn
  5. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Josef, Leif,

    I sent the "How to role small tubes" article to Ron some time ago. Don't think this is at the top of his priority list currently so I'll have to look into posting it with Rick. The following photos are from the article. The first is tube formed using an internal armature. External bending tools should also work as well. The next shows a set of several long lenths for general purpose building. The last is the rudder for the Orlik Triplane.

    I've found that the best wire for Wright Cyclone ignition leads at 1:33 is a nylon coated, 7 wire stainless steel cable 10 mils in diameter. It has a natural flexibility that's diffult to achieve with solder at this scale. Josef's system works perfectly though and probably is the best solution at this scale.

    Gil

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  6. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    Looking forward to that, Gil, as always! You know, my Cyclone is in 1/16, which is the reason I thought Josef's solder might do the trick very nicely.

    As for the chairs I was mentioning, I've made a test chair using 1,5 mm copper wire, and soldered the joints. I'm looking for something a little bit softer to bend, while still being able to solder it. The alternative is to use thicker solder and glue.

    That alternative might be more attractive, since I'm rather reluctant to drag out the old soldering iron and get my fingers burnt time and again. Particularly since there are some ten chairs to be made. Anyways, I'm back to recolouring, I am, for the duration...

    Leif
  7. charliec

    charliec Active Member

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    Did you anneal the copper wire before trying to bend it? From memory
    the anneal procedure for copper is to heat it until the surface oxidises - goes
    dark grey - then plunge into water. Freshly annealed copper is very soft
    and easy to bend.

    Regards,

    Charlie
  8. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Leif,

    Don't try the solder it's just too soft for the application. Charlie's suggestion will yield dead soft copper. Clean the wire with fine sandpaper. To straighten a length after annealing put one end in a vice and grip the other end in the jaws of a pliers. Hold the wire taught against the vice and give the pliers a sharp rap with a hammer. The wire will now be nice and straight ready for forming....,

    Gil
  9. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    Thanks guys for the tips and warnings. Will adhere. In order not to hijack Josef's thread further, let's just remind the powers-to-be that we are watching picture-of-the-week material here, right?

    Leif
  10. fuchsjos

    fuchsjos Member

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    Dear Leif,

    Following the hints about working with wires, the tips and tricks were very good and useful. For your problems about the seats, there is eventually one more possible solution. Perhaps you can also work with styrene microstripes. Warming and forming them with a hotair-gun, gluing to paper is very easy by using benzol or another resolvent. Look at:
    http://www.kartonbau.de/thread.php?threadid=826&sid=
    which shows the way to do it. It's in german, but the pictures are self decsribing.

    Friendly greetings
    Josef
  11. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    Thanks, Josef. Possibly a very good tip. Although I hate working with material that needs smelly solvents and heat... I'll think about this. - Leif
  12. fuchsjos

    fuchsjos Member

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    Report_42:

    In the meantime I have collected enough part to activate my etching machinery and I could start the making of the mainframe. This one I want from start on do with etching parts for the reason of stability and weight. Here you can see both of the frame rail, where I have etched with small lines, showing the place of other parts.

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    Report_43:

    The rails have a thickness of 2 mm. As I work with brass sheet with 0,2 or 0,3 mm, I had to stick some more pieces together to reach the material thickness. To spare some brass parts and give it a touch of cardmodel the middle layer is made of 0,5 mm bristol cardboard, a new way of composite material :)

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    Report_44:

    A pin was placed into the holes of the shock absorbers as a help for adjustment when I grinded the edges. The glueing of the layers was done with viscous CA glue and grinded after drying. I applied some primer to control the grindings, because the CA glue is nearly invisible after drying.

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    Report_45:

    The mounting of the parts for the mainframe caused some headache to me, because the adjusting was very important and could degrade the complete finish result. Finally I remembered my old solder board, which was a good solution for the problem.

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    Report_46:

    After gluing the parts, there were some more little parts and the placing of the rivets.

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    Report_47:

    The cross bars were also 'strengthen' with a piece of bristol cardboard and also some other parts were made of paper which was soaked with CA glue. If you take a closer look at the middle cross bar you can see a gap of 1,5 mm, as I have noticed in one of the first reports (part 3 is too short about 1,5 mm). Although I have 'pluged up' the parts with CA glue, you could see the gap - this is the reason for the control-coloring (invisible things are realy hard to see :) ).

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  13. fuchsjos

    fuchsjos Member

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    Report_48:

    For the compensators of the flat springs I want to try something new - I love to be experimental. The mounting was done with real bolts and nuts (M 0,8 = 31,5 mil!)

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    Report_49:

    After a long time and some censored exclamations (not the right words for young ears) all nuts were screwed. I have no tool for such little nuts (width across flats of 1,5 mm), so I did it with a tweezers. I have set the control of right hinge moment aside.

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    Report_50:

    The lower fastening of the compensators was done with rivets (shaft diameter 0,6 mm). Sadly I remembered only now after finishing of the main frame, that the additional flat spring at the front axle was only at the driver side mounted - anyway - I don't change the srewing anymore.

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    Report_51:

    Then I completed the coloring and refine it.

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    Report_52:

    This is a look at the thing in the right position. Sadly it is not possible to show at the pictures, that suspension is fully functional. For the reason that the flat springs were made of Paper I have to back off my play instinct to prevent a spring break. Indeed this mobility is a great advantage because all four wheels would reach the ground.

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  14. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Josef,

    Absolutely fantastic! What's your etching setup?

    Till next, Gil
  15. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    Absolutely in a league by itself! - L.
  16. Bernie

    Bernie Member

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    Joseph - absolutelly great work /what a amazing tools you use - vise/

    I used in the past just once my accu - drilling machine to maka 1mm hole in 2mm /diameter/ stick - looked funny
  17. fuchsjos

    fuchsjos Member

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    Hello Gil!

    Thank you for the compliments.

    Making of selfmade etchingparts in 5 Steps:

    1. FILM:
    After drawing the parts, I make a film. Small films are printed to transperancy film with a inkjet printer (Epson Stylus Color 1160). Bigger films were done by a repro studio (reason is the falsification by printing large documents with a inkjet printer).

    2. EXPOSURE:
    I do it with a semi-professional UV-exposure unit. 4Ã-15 W, Timer.
    Normally I make double side etching parts.

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    3. PROCESSING:
    The (positiv) exposured sheets are processed with standard chemicals (caustic soda 7g to 1l water).

    4. ETCHING:
    I'm using a semi-professional etching arrangement with 1,5 l volume, heating and two air sputterer.

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    5. ETCHED PARTS:
    Now it is time to have some fun.
    All units for etching are available at http://www.saemann-aetztechnik.de/index.html , but this site is only in german!
    All tools are the same to make circuit boards.

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    After some work you get the result, a winch in 1:250.

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    Take a little look at my workshop.

    The main work place:

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    The etching corner:

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    The electric tooling concentration:

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    Kindly regards
    Josef
  18. fuchsjos

    fuchsjos Member

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    Hi, Bernie!

    Thank you for the nice statement. Your work is also fascinating.

    How many spiral drills do you have destroyed with this action? :)

    Kindly greetings
    Josef
  19. fuchsjos

    fuchsjos Member

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    Hello Leif!

    Thank you! Sometimes I think, I'm the 'missing link' between the cardmodelers and the plastic modelers. :wink:

    Servus
    Josef
  20. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Josef,

    Well, that left me rather speechless..., fabulous setup! The etch setup is first class and I can see why you can't help but use now and then. The 1:250 winch is a miniature jewel unto itself.

    Thanks for takikng the time to share your "office"...,

    Gil