Saltbox House Scratchbuild

Discussion in 'Scratchin' & Bashin'' started by eightyeightfan1, Dec 18, 2004.

  1. Will_annand

    Will_annand Active Member

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    Looking good, Ed. :thumb: :thumb:

    I especially like the long shot showing the whole lot. :cool:
    You forgot the "For Sale" sign on that new house.

    Can't wait to see what the new owners do with the lot.
    Maybe add a garden and swimming pool in the backyard. If they are rich, it might be a tennis court. Maybe a gazebo to sit and enjoy the air?

    Course it could be a family of rednecks and there would be 10-12 rusted cars out back along with numerous rusted parts and a still under the tree. :D
  2. Tyson Rayles

    Tyson Rayles Active Member

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    Very nice Ed!
  3. Matthyro

    Matthyro Will always be re-membered

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    That kind of home would be at "HOME" anywhere Ed.
  4. eightyeightfan1

    eightyeightfan1 Now I'm AMP'd

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    Thanks everyone!
  5. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Fantastic Ed!!!!! Well worth the wait for the photos. :thumb: thumb: thumb:

    Val
  6. sumpter250

    sumpter250 multiscale modelbuilder

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    ayuh, that's a fine lookin saltbox! :thumb: :thumb:

    Historically, salt box homes were built with the long roof facing north. This allowed the cold north winds a long slope to blow over, and exposed the high "front" side to the sun for the longest part of the day. Helped reduce the amount of firewood that had to be cut, and stacked.
    Lots of 'em out on eastern Long Island, mostly cedar shake sided.







    "I work hard, I'll tell ya. Sometimes it's near nine O'clock 'for my shirts dry enough to go to bed"- Virgil Bliss (The dirtiest man in Hancock county)
    [Marshall Dodge, "Bert and I, stories from Down East"]