1. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator Moderator

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    Allen, are you designing a real plane, or just the paper model? (Just joking my friend)
    You are doing an OUTSTANDING job on the design of this model.
    It is coming together BEAUTIFULLY.
    It looks like it will be a very fun model to build.
  2. goodduck

    goodduck Active Member

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    Got my laser cut today. The cut was beautiful! But, I made a big boo boo. The illustration board I picked was just a little thicker then the 1mm I need, so the fit was very very tight. It took brute force to put the fuselage together, so I didn't even try to put everything else on cause I will just end up breaking all the small parts. Going have to go back to art supply store to get a new board and then order a new cut next week. But, still I was very happy to see the fuselage frame was a lot stronger then I expected

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  3. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator Moderator

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    I like how the frame work has turned out. (Even though you picked the wrong size card stock) It looks FANTASTIC!!!
  4. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    You might want to pick up a set of machinists files. These will allow you to easily remove any excess stock and turn a tight fit into an advantage. I would also pickup a set of vernier calipers. This way you can measure the material down to .001" of an inch. The are relatively inexpensive. Personally, I would not discard this frame, if you take the same amount of stock on each side of the part, they will be centered so the oversize will not be an issue. I have a set of Nicholson files almost 30 years old. These cost around $30 dollars, but well worth every penny!

    http://www.amazon.com/Nicholson-Piece-Hobby-Carded-Length/dp/B00002N5JT/ref=pd_sbs_indust_6

    [​IMG]

    The frame looks magnificent!! As does the design. You are kicking butt, again! :)

    I have always liked Brown and Sharp tools, Starrett, and Mitutoyo, but these are for a machine shop and you can get a set of calipers for $39 dollars from Amazon (link below) that will serve you will, without breaking the bank. The digital ones can go from SAE to Metric. That's always nice. I recommend the ones below because the have the ability to read as a depth gauge. This is a very useful tool that you will wonder how you did without (if you don't have a set already).

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005002TS6...&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&ref=asc_df_B005002TS6

    [​IMG]
  5. goodduck

    goodduck Active Member

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    I do have all that, just not with me at the time.
  6. The frame looks wonderful. I don't doubt it is very strong!
  7. goodduck

    goodduck Active Member

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    Took the frame design to the laser cutter this morning and got it back in afternoon. Not only they did a bang up job for me, they give me discount by not charging me the someday service rush feed . The laser cut frame went together perfectly, if I have to cut that by hand layer by layer, that would take me weeks to build that.

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  8. goodduck

    goodduck Active Member

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    Couple things still need attention. First is the wing tip edge that don't need to break that up to 3 sections like it is now. Second, I think I should drop the triangle leading edge, don't think I really need it or make them like the wing tip edge.

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  9. goodduck

    goodduck Active Member

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    Last, think I should reposition the aileron ribs. It is ok as is, but think I can reposition the ribs better to make it functional.

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  10. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    That wing has one of the most graceful organic curves to it! I bet you could make one of the best bird models ever made. Elegantly wonderful.
  11. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator Moderator

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    You are doing a PHENAMINAL job on this.
    The frame is absolutely breathtaking.
    I have to say that this is going to be the MOST sturdiest model that I have ever seen.

    Are you sure that this is not a mock-up for the real thing?
    Please tell us that we will not be seeing you (any time soon) flying around on a real one of these (or ARE YOU?).
  12. The frame alone is looking wonderful. Just wonderful.
    Seeing this glider being born in your hands is like a dream come true!
    I'm enjoying every update.
    I have one question: what kind of material is the frame? Is that some kind of cardboard? if so I guess the weapons can be sanded to make them smooth.
    I like the details you are making. This may be the best model in any medium of anything Nausicaa-related!
  13. goodduck

    goodduck Active Member

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    Hey, thanks guys. The frame cut from Crecent illustration board 300.6 cold press 20"x30", medium weight .50-.60. Cost $6.50. each at the local art supply store. There are board that cost less, but it was the only white board that thick. The board is .052" (1.32mm) thick. My design was .04" so I have to resized all the lap joints to .052"(I can't find any true 1mm board anywhere, all are 1.3 ~1.5). I don't think the thicker board will post any problem to the skin, I do have .015~.02 of space to play with. But true will be told when I start laying the skin. The frame do looks like it can fly. Actually, if one can find a fan motor small and prayerful enough to drop inside, I'm sure it can fly.
  14. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator Moderator

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    I am certain that there are a few RC junkies out there that would like to make this beauty of a bird fly.
    If I knew more about RC aircrafts, I would make it fly myself.
  15. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Beautiful model. Flight, another thing altogether. The Nausicaa figure would have to have Artificial Intelligence matching that of Nausicaa herself to make it work. I have made wings fly, but you have to make the camber bigger on the bottom than on top. This is because the negative pressure developing on the leading edge cause the wing to push down. This is usually balanced and controlled by the elevator. The reason an aircraft tends to nose down is due to center of gravity, not aerodynamic forces.

    The picture of this model shows what I am referring to perfectly on the B2 Stealth Bomber. A paper flying wing, having a larger air foil on the bottom, with a 70 degree bend in the wings, with flaps and flaperons installed, and with a proper center of gravity, will fly, and rather nicely. If any wind comes along, and causes the craft to lose balance, it will abruptly go into a spin and stall, then crash. This is because there is no way of inducing the required recovery methods on a paper plane.

    I've made many flying wing models, some that have flown hundreds of feet. Eventually, like every three flights or so, they spin, stall, and crash.

    Moral is, Never through Mowe, it will crash!! :)

    [​IMG]
  16. arkon

    arkon Member

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    your framework is breathtaking!!!:thumb::thumb:
  17. Exactly my thougthts.
    The original Northrop flying wing bombers were a nice concept, but back in the 1940s the absence of computers and AI to help control the aircraft made it a complete disaster. The pilot alone could not control all the problems described by Zathros.
    It was until after modern computerized controls were developed that the B2 Spirit could come to existence.

    Although the Moewe designed by Allen looks beautiful, and I'm certain it would make a wonderful model, the RC hobby is still too far from having a good control to allow it to fly as it should.

    Allen, about the skins of the glider: will you leave it just white, or will there be any kind of "weathering"?

    Regards,
  18. t.l.williamsjr

    t.l.williamsjr Member

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    Actually, according to the USAF chief test pilot for the plane, there was only one fatal maneuver in the flight envelope. That was if the pilot allowed the A/C to enter a stall. Once into a stall the Wing would act like a thing sheet of balsa wood when dropped and rotate about the horizontal axis. The real reason the Wing was canceled was strictly a political hatchet job by the Sec. of the AF, he told Jack Northrup that the plane would be built by Convair in Texas, and when Northrup refused to agree to this, canceled the Flying Wing and made the next major bomber of the USAF the Aluminum Overcast, otherwise known as the B-36, a uniquely poor aircraft that only had a long range advantage and a wider bomb-bay, which could have been implemented in the Flying Wing.

  19. goodduck

    goodduck Active Member

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  20. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Allen, the last video is the most revealing. Did you notice how graceful the flights became once her turned Nausicaa into a big rudder ( on top of the tip rudders, disguising themselves)? The first videos are more of a series of recoveries, not very stable. It flew, but if it was made out of anything other than Styrofoam, I doubt it would have got gone very far, Styrofoamis very forgiving.

    The last flight was about as nice as a flight as could ever be achieved with those wings, very nice. I saw these videos last year on YouTube (there are some guys there flying mini Savoia S021's), when another member (who was making an R/C Biplane) was posting his discoveries. IF this guy did a little tweaking on the wings, he could have a much more graceful flying craft, but it is really nice.


    You can see the plane fighting not to spin, In this case, the Nausicaa figure is acting as a rudder. I followed this guy when he first started. He worked on this very hard on this. He posted many videos of the crashes he experienced. He was very confident he would succeed. I think the key to his success is that is he essentially turned the two fuel tanks into rudders by extending them way out and making them flat and perpendicular to the wings. Once he did that, he stabilized the wing. Some would cause this cheating but whatever works. If someone wanted to keep the model accurate, a better result would be using a clear sheet of plastic placed between the legs of the Nausicaa figure. You would then get a far more stable model. Very neat stuff. Flying the ship as it came out of the comic could not work, but as with most of Miyazaki's designs, they have a strong basis in real aerospace, so with very little tweaking, it was made into a flying machine. You work on a flying wing long enough, you will get flight.

    Now, getting a Flapter to fly? This is freakin' amazing!!

    [YOUTUBE]9EvcPcw4fAg[/YOUTUBE]