JSC Indianapolis in 1:400

Discussion in 'Ship & Watercraft Models' started by emayday, Aug 5, 2005.

  1. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

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    Brad;
    I use Krylon acrylic matte; it's similar to what artists use to fix a finished pastel picture. Light, sweeping coats works best, as in any spray painting. A can will last for quite a few models, I've found.
    Hope this helps.

    Really looking great, Ed!

    Cheers!
    Jim
  2. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

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    Brad;
    I use Krylon acrylic matte; it's similar to what artists use to fix a finished pastel picture. Light, sweeping coats works best, as in any spray painting. A can will last for quite a few models, I've found.
    Hope this helps.

    Really looking great, Ed!

    Cheers!
    Jim
  3. emayday

    emayday Member

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    Jim

    I presume the spraying of the clear matte is done prior to assembly, is that correct?
  4. emayday

    emayday Member

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    Jim

    I presume the spraying of the clear matte is done prior to assembly, is that correct?
  5. emayday

    emayday Member

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    I'm beginning the gun turrets today, but looking for advise regarding the barrels. JSC does not provide the barrels thamselves in the kit....only templates. I find it a little unusual, since the 1/700 DN Dreadnought provided (and I used) the paper barrels. Anyway, I'm looking for input as to the various methods of construction used by you modelers out there. Wood....plastic.....paper......metal........how do you do it? The only automated tool I have is a Dremel with press. Any help appreciated...thanx in advance.
  6. emayday

    emayday Member

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    I'm beginning the gun turrets today, but looking for advise regarding the barrels. JSC does not provide the barrels thamselves in the kit....only templates. I find it a little unusual, since the 1/700 DN Dreadnought provided (and I used) the paper barrels. Anyway, I'm looking for input as to the various methods of construction used by you modelers out there. Wood....plastic.....paper......metal........how do you do it? The only automated tool I have is a Dremel with press. Any help appreciated...thanx in advance.
  7. bholderman

    bholderman Member

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    Ed,

    My only thoughts as a begginner (and unfamiliarilty with Indy's guns) would be to take the DN's guns and play with scaling them, it might help develope some ideas at least.

    Cheers,
    Brad
  8. bholderman

    bholderman Member

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    Ed,

    My only thoughts as a begginner (and unfamiliarilty with Indy's guns) would be to take the DN's guns and play with scaling them, it might help develope some ideas at least.

    Cheers,
    Brad
  9. Darwin

    Darwin Member

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    Ed, I would recommend using round toothpicks. Break them in the middle, chuck them into the Dremel tool, and then use fine or medium grit sandpaper on a sanding block to get the taper and thickness shown on the plan template. The Indy has 8-inch main guns. In 1:400 scale, the diameter of the muzzle will only be about 1/20 inch at most, which is really a bit too small for most builders to form out of cardstock. You might take a look at my Helena string for a description of how I "turned" the barrels manually from wood dowels. In 1:400 scale, I would recommend using 22 or 24 AWG solid wire (preferably insulated, so the insulation can be left in place on the breech end of the barrel to give a step in the barrel diameter) for the 5-inch secondary armament, and use 26 or 28 AWG solid wire for the anti-aircraft guns. Felt tip or water colors work well for painting wooden barrels; use flat acrylic or enamel paint on wire.
  10. Darwin

    Darwin Member

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    Ed, I would recommend using round toothpicks. Break them in the middle, chuck them into the Dremel tool, and then use fine or medium grit sandpaper on a sanding block to get the taper and thickness shown on the plan template. The Indy has 8-inch main guns. In 1:400 scale, the diameter of the muzzle will only be about 1/20 inch at most, which is really a bit too small for most builders to form out of cardstock. You might take a look at my Helena string for a description of how I "turned" the barrels manually from wood dowels. In 1:400 scale, I would recommend using 22 or 24 AWG solid wire (preferably insulated, so the insulation can be left in place on the breech end of the barrel to give a step in the barrel diameter) for the 5-inch secondary armament, and use 26 or 28 AWG solid wire for the anti-aircraft guns. Felt tip or water colors work well for painting wooden barrels; use flat acrylic or enamel paint on wire.
  11. Darwin

    Darwin Member

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    Ed, I didn't see your question about the acrylic protective coat until after I posted. My recommendation is to take some scrap cardstock, spray it and let dry, then try using it for some "typical" joins. I've found that spraying before assembly does help make glue slops easier to clean up, but that very property can interfere with getting a good glue bond. If you don't have any problems gluing the treated scrap cardstock, then spray before assembly. If you have problems with good bonds, then wait until after assembly to spray, and keep the model away from moisture during the build. I second Krylon brand as a good one to use. It should be available in the "art supplies" section of about any super-store (Walmart, K-Mart, Smith's) or craft store (Robert's, Michael's, etc.).
  12. Darwin

    Darwin Member

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    Ed, I didn't see your question about the acrylic protective coat until after I posted. My recommendation is to take some scrap cardstock, spray it and let dry, then try using it for some "typical" joins. I've found that spraying before assembly does help make glue slops easier to clean up, but that very property can interfere with getting a good glue bond. If you don't have any problems gluing the treated scrap cardstock, then spray before assembly. If you have problems with good bonds, then wait until after assembly to spray, and keep the model away from moisture during the build. I second Krylon brand as a good one to use. It should be available in the "art supplies" section of about any super-store (Walmart, K-Mart, Smith's) or craft store (Robert's, Michael's, etc.).
  13. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

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    Ed,

    Sorry for the delayed response, I was a bit busy...yesterday was my wife's Birthday. :wink:

    I second Darwin's suggestion, it is always best to test something before spraying up your templates, and it also gives you an idea of how much paint is discharged using the spray can. It's all too easy to over do it, just light coats is good, and, yes, it's best (at least for me) to do it before assembly. I haven't found any real problem with PVA bonding on the coated cardstock using the acrylic matte spray; can't say whether a gloss or other product would have the same results, though.

    As to the barrels, JSC seems to rely upon the use of outside materials for some parts, like wire for some of the masting and flag staffs and wood for barrels, etc. If you want, you could try rolling them using regular weight paper around a thin wire or pin. I have a pin mounted in a 1/4" diameter dowel that I use for lots of things, and rolling small tubes is one of them. I used this to make the carronades on the Constitution. You can also use brass rods for the same purpose, and they come in different sizes. It might take a bit of practice to impart the slight increase in diameter to the tube that your barrels might require, but it becomes easier as you do them; I found that out after making about 20 barrels for the carronades. :lol:

    Also, you can add a shorter strip at the breech end where the barrel is stepped; the JSC illustrations should give you the right proportions to work with. Of course, you can either use paper you've pre-colored using your printer or paint it after the barrel is done. One benefit is you should end up with a hollow end, although perhaps not exactly to scale, but I personally like to see barrels with an open end...unless, of course, you are intending to add a tampion to the end as some ships use (that's the round cover that goes over the end of the barrel when the gun is not being used, for those who were guessing what the heck I was talking about :D ).

    I also like to coat the whole thing with a bit of white glue to firm it up a bit, but I do that while it's still on the rod I rolled it on to hopefully keep the barrel straight...you should probably paint the body of the barrel while still on the rod too, touching up the ends when that paint has dried. I'm sure there are other ways of doing this, but this is the way I have been doing it lately. I think you get a smoother surface on the barrels when doing it this way than a wooden dowel/toothpick might give you, but I would suggest you try making the barrels a few ways and see which one you like the best.

    Well, hope this is not too late to be of any use to you, Ed.

    Cheers!
    Jim
  14. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

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    Ed,

    Sorry for the delayed response, I was a bit busy...yesterday was my wife's Birthday. :wink:

    I second Darwin's suggestion, it is always best to test something before spraying up your templates, and it also gives you an idea of how much paint is discharged using the spray can. It's all too easy to over do it, just light coats is good, and, yes, it's best (at least for me) to do it before assembly. I haven't found any real problem with PVA bonding on the coated cardstock using the acrylic matte spray; can't say whether a gloss or other product would have the same results, though.

    As to the barrels, JSC seems to rely upon the use of outside materials for some parts, like wire for some of the masting and flag staffs and wood for barrels, etc. If you want, you could try rolling them using regular weight paper around a thin wire or pin. I have a pin mounted in a 1/4" diameter dowel that I use for lots of things, and rolling small tubes is one of them. I used this to make the carronades on the Constitution. You can also use brass rods for the same purpose, and they come in different sizes. It might take a bit of practice to impart the slight increase in diameter to the tube that your barrels might require, but it becomes easier as you do them; I found that out after making about 20 barrels for the carronades. :lol:

    Also, you can add a shorter strip at the breech end where the barrel is stepped; the JSC illustrations should give you the right proportions to work with. Of course, you can either use paper you've pre-colored using your printer or paint it after the barrel is done. One benefit is you should end up with a hollow end, although perhaps not exactly to scale, but I personally like to see barrels with an open end...unless, of course, you are intending to add a tampion to the end as some ships use (that's the round cover that goes over the end of the barrel when the gun is not being used, for those who were guessing what the heck I was talking about :D ).

    I also like to coat the whole thing with a bit of white glue to firm it up a bit, but I do that while it's still on the rod I rolled it on to hopefully keep the barrel straight...you should probably paint the body of the barrel while still on the rod too, touching up the ends when that paint has dried. I'm sure there are other ways of doing this, but this is the way I have been doing it lately. I think you get a smoother surface on the barrels when doing it this way than a wooden dowel/toothpick might give you, but I would suggest you try making the barrels a few ways and see which one you like the best.

    Well, hope this is not too late to be of any use to you, Ed.

    Cheers!
    Jim
  15. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    I use Kyrlon due to its availability and price. It works well. One suggestion is to preheat the contents of the can under running hot water for a couple of minutes. You will find the spray atomization is improved allowing a lighter more even spary coat.

    -Gil
  16. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    I use Kyrlon due to its availability and price. It works well. One suggestion is to preheat the contents of the can under running hot water for a couple of minutes. You will find the spray atomization is improved allowing a lighter more even spary coat.

    -Gil
  17. emayday

    emayday Member

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    Thanx for the tips on clear matte spray guys.....duly noted.

    Jim.....
    The barrel information you provide is quite informative.....and definitely not to late...haven't started on them yet. but will take your advise and try a few different methods.
  18. emayday

    emayday Member

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    Thanx for the tips on clear matte spray guys.....duly noted.

    Jim.....
    The barrel information you provide is quite informative.....and definitely not to late...haven't started on them yet. but will take your advise and try a few different methods.
  19. emayday

    emayday Member

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    No. 1 turret on the left is shown assembled as instructed from the kit part and I was not quite happy with the result. No.2 turret is shown after some modification and paint.....still not true to the 1/1 but I think it is closer and makes a better presentation. At least as much as my limited experience and patience will allow at this time. Now for the barrels.........

    [​IMG]
  20. emayday

    emayday Member

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    No. 1 turret on the left is shown assembled as instructed from the kit part and I was not quite happy with the result. No.2 turret is shown after some modification and paint.....still not true to the 1/1 but I think it is closer and makes a better presentation. At least as much as my limited experience and patience will allow at this time. Now for the barrels.........

    [​IMG]