1. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator Moderator

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    I know that I have (more than like) said this before, but your work should be published. You should put a book together with all of your work and have a small story with each drawing!

    KEEP UP THE GREAT WORK!!!
  2. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    Really, a book with your drawings, and maybe a book that has some features left out, to try and teach others. It would expand the people you could sell it to, and those who would want to buy it! This is great stuff. It would be cool if you made some cut outs, and layered them to give depth, and something to compare them too visually. :)
  3. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    meet the two coelophysoids of china. panguraptor was a fairly recent discovery. it's a newly described genus of small coelophysoid that lived in the early Jurassic period. along with it, there was sinosaurus triassicus. this 5.5 meter long monster was distantly related to panguraptor, but with some obvious differences. despite its looks, it was more closely related to crylophosaurus then to dilophosaurus. given it's bulkier build and stronger, more robust jaws.
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  4. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    cartorhynchus lenticarpus is the New Basal Ichthyosauriform from the Lower Triassic of China. this little beasty represents a transition of when among the great diversity of reptiles, a certain group adapted tolife back into the seas, and latter became ichthyosaurs. at only 40 cm (1.31 ft) it wasn't that impressive in size, but it still offers a large amount of information on the evolution of the dolphin mimic reptiles
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  5. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    the big, bad Pinocchio rex hanging with his/ her young
    qianzhousaurus was a rather small tyrannosaurid with rather lanky body proportions and an identifiably slender snout. much different then "traditional" tyrannosaurs. its possible that this relatively new clade of tyrannosaur was focused more so on the predation of smaller, fast moving prey items compared to its relatives.
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  6. CrimsonLine

    CrimsonLine Member

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    I agree that detailed backgrounds would be of great value to your work. You lavish time and attention on the creatures, and produce stunning renditions of them, floating in empty, white space.
  7. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    many people on another forum have asked me to make a tutorial. on how I draw dinosaurs. I might as well share it here as well

    heres my first ever, step by step tutorial.

    1)first things first, get some reference material.
    unless you want you velociraptor to look more like a deinonychus or you spinosaurus to look more like a suchimimus, I suggest that if you want to make an accurate drawing, you need to get some reference material. this can easily get accomplished by looking at many skeletal mounts of the specific animal you want to depict ( or relatives if the animal you want to draw is based off of few remains). also look at skeletal drawing and even sculptures to inspire the desired look, pose, texture, coloring, etc of you creature.
    another good idea is looking at our modern day dinosaurs. birds can conjure up a large array of poses that can easily translate to their ancient, multi-ton ancestry( just don't get overboard and start drawing a sue sized t-rex perched on a tree branch and say " if song birds can do it, why not a t-rex?" you might get away with that with a deinonychus, but I'm pretty sure people would start questioning you intellect if you did this seriously and not jokingly)
    I have decided on drawing a torvosaurus for this tutorial. reasons being is because 1)it has a rather simple and recognizable theropod body platform, 2)I love megalosaurids, 3) torvosaurus is is a badass. so after a rather quick and easy search on google, this skeletal reconstruction caught my interest the most.

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    I like the pose it has. as well as how the perspective have his head looking larger and more terrifying then what it really is. so my overall drawing and pose would look similar to this. I might depict it running though. have it sanding on one foot, probably charging at a rival, or in pursuit of prey. it's up to you to decide.
    you can go on and use and reference you want.

    secondly, the anatomy is another crucial element. get a good image on how the animal can move and act. and know what it can and cannot do. it helps to look at the musculature of theropods and birds, as well as other animals.
    in this case, god bless you scott Hartman
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    with this reference, you can correctly outline the possible contours for your theropod.
    in the next step, we can start using pencils.
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 23, 2014
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  8. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    Just a close up of a therapist arm. I needed to post it here so I can place it in another forum. ignore this if you want to

    Attached Files:

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  9. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    maaradactylus kellneri is one of our more recent pterosaur discoveries of 2014. maaradactylus was a rather large anhanguerid pterosaur with numerous large, procumbent teeth that lived in the lower cretaceous. what's unique about this pterosaur is that it's jaws are slightly curved upward. something that usually Isn't present in large anhanguerids. it's large crest occupies almost 40% of the entire skull.
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    falcarius was a 3-4 meter long basal therizinosaur with a very elongated body and neck. it name means "sickle cutter" which obviously referes to it's enlarged manus claws.
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    a microraptor pulling out a fish it just caught.
    I made this sketch during school, bases one a microraptor skeleton that retains several fish remains in its gut.so this either means that microraptor was either very generalist with it's diet or being primary piscivore. either way, it does mean that microraptor was accustomed to having fish as part of its diet.
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  10. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    Dude, have you met Allen Tam (Goodduck) yet? I will Introduce you to him.
  11. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    he recently liked a couple of my drawings. I would gladly make a conversation with him.
  12. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    I am very new to the world of digital sculpting. but heres a WIP of my first time putting true effort in sculptris. I only got the program installed about a week ago. unfortunately, I haven't used any references or skeletal views, so some of the proportions are off. my next sculpture would be an attempt to make a creature of an overall accuracy similar to its skeletal design. the dinosaur being modeled is a saurophaganax
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  13. goodduck

    goodduck Active Member

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    Long thread, took some time to read everything.

    Here is couple of books from Burne Hogarth (who taught me when I was a young student at Art Center College of Design) you should look at: "Dynamic Figure Drawing", "Drawing Dynamic hand". Not dinosaurs drawing books but idea are the same, "foundation". Hit the books stand for "American Artist Drawing" magazine. Yes I know, it is not dinosaur’s mag. Check it out, read how and why the artists did what they did. It will help your drawings. Look at how other artist put in / leaves off detail. Most time you don’t need to spell everything out. Putting detail in everywhere can get very busy. Some time it is better to leave off some detail and let the viewer fill in the detail themselves mentally. “Drawing and Composition Visual Storytellers” by Marcos Mesteu Mestre. Art of movies, art of feature animation and art of video games books are very good ref source and inspiration. Not all but some. Disney, Pixar, DreamWorks put out very good ART OF books. Don't limit yourself to only look at dino stuff, look at everything. I am used to draw like artists in AAD mag, nowadays I draw (digitally) like Paul Calle, or should I say I adopted that style of drawing. His drawing book helps me to see the world differently. I wish he teach in Art Center when I was there. Maybe you should check out his drawings too to see if that is a style you would like to investigate.

    Here are few things everyone in any studios use: Wacom Cintiq. This is THE tool of the trade as much as Photoshop is. Get your hand on one if you not already. Next best thing: Wacom Intuos Pro (medium). (Large) take up way too much desk space. If you are not drawing on Cintiq, you don’t want that much hand movement. I personally like using (small) for my laptop, little hand movement, great for to-go when I am on the road. At home I draw with 24" Cintiq. There is also Wacom Bamboo wireless pad now, think I’ll get one too.

    Some members here talking about you should print you drawings. If you are ready, here is couple of place of self-book publishing sites my co-workers used to print theirs portfolio: www.lulu.com & www.blurb.com

    Cheers
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  14. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator Moderator

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  15. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    gooduck: i'll be sure to look up and view every book you just recommended. thank you so much for taking your time to veiw my thread. believe it or not, i never did get proper training or teaching for art. i just self taut myself over the years. with anceint animals being a passion of mine, it would explain why they make up the bulk of my artistic representations. but i also dable in drawing some video game characters ( mostly assassin creed charactors) in several sketch books. i would like to thank you again for your advice.

    rhaven: i actually drew every single one of the species of crocodyliforms on that site. with kaprosuchus and Anatosuchus being drawn a couple times. but it was always nice to read it again.
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  16. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    another drawing made during school( and this thing took a long time to do) i used a ball point pen and a permanent marker
    basilosaurus is a genus of early whale that lived 40 to 34 million years ago in the Late Eocene. it was very elongated archaeocetes, and could of measured in lengths up to 56 ft. Basilosaurus had a wedged-shaped head up to 5 feet long with jaws containing two types of teeth. The teeth in the front, anterior, of the jaw had cone-shaped teeth which caught and held its prey while triangular-shaped teeth in the rear, posterior, of the jaw sliced them up. The type and amount of wear on the teeth of the Basilosaurus indicates that it likely ate fish and squid (Johnston 1991 Carpenter and White 1986).
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  17. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    a person asked me via deveint art to illistrate the newly discovered Erythrosuchid of south africa
    meet Garjainia madiba. this big-headed oddity has the standard erythrosuchid body plan, and would otherwise be regarded as just another garjainia prima, if it weren't for the two sets of bonny bosses on it's face! having one pair at the jugual and a second pair behind the post orbitals, Garjainia madiba in unique among the erythrosuchids. whats also noticeable is it's significantly higher tooth count compared to others like him. being over 8 feet in length, Garjainia madiba could of been able to predate on a large variety of animals that lived247 million years ago.
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  18. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    some deinocheirus progress in sculptris. still a work in progress
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  19. freddyman

    freddyman newbie

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    hears some progress. unfortunately for reasons unknown to me, sculptris ends up crashing as soon as i try to even grab something, making my capability to add more detail absolutely zero. i don't even have a chance to further detail the tail or legs. i haven't even placed claws on them yet and the fourth digit[​IMG] [​IMG] . it is now officially, getting on my nerves. so i decided to just go ahead and color it.
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  20. Revell-Fan

    Revell-Fan Co-Administrator Administrator Moderator

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    I am so impressed! :)