HMS Savage build

Discussion in 'Ship & Watercraft Models' started by barry, Jun 3, 2004.

  1. Ajax

    Ajax Member

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    Wow, you've been busy, Barry! :D

    I love the look of the midship's fire control and the big searchlight. This ship really is packed with a lot of details!

    AJ
  2. Ajax

    Ajax Member

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    Thanks, Barry! I followed your advice on the Yuki Yuji thread about doubling the waterline and main deck plates and tip for cutting out the masts. I do plan on building YY's Kirov, but right now I think I want to take a break from the 1:700 scale and try something a bit bigger... like one of DN's Russian boats. ;)

    Yes it is, especially now that even Ron has put away his bucket and stopped bailing! :lol:

    AJ
  3. barry

    barry Active Member

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    My first try at soldered masts hmmmm!

    Hi gang

    Tried to solder up some masts they are not that good but some work with a file and comment from Rob and we may get somewhere. Anyway it took me ages to dream up a way of holding the bits in place which I finally did by holding the main mast in a third hand and jabbibg the tripod rear legs into a bit of foam and a lot of cursing etc.

    At least it's standing up by itsself!!!

    See for yourselves hints will be gratefully accepted.

    barry
  4. barry

    barry Active Member

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    Savage continued

    continued

    bow and stern progress torp tubes are still dry fitted to give some room to work

    barry
  5. barry

    barry Active Member

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    Bofors

    cont bofors twin mount

    barry
  6. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi barry

    First the photos you did outside realy show of the good work you have done, great job.

    Second, what type of solder did you use (plumbers or electrical ect).
    Quick hint, I'am no expert but most of the art to this is in the prep.
    If handling the wire you must give it a quick clean with some wire wool or sand paper to remove the grease of your fingers. If you don't the solder won't run well and form into globs.

    Third, when cutting the wire try to cut it to the angle in relation to the section it will be soldered to. Also it is quite importent to try to keep it on the pattern, this helps to keep the shape. If this is hard as in building a tripod mast then solder a bit of wire to the section you have built as a support and this can be bent in to the required shape to hold the work up while you solder the next section.

    Forth

    The golden rule when soldering, you can never use to much flux and don't stick your fingers in your mouth while using it :lol:

    Some time this week I will try to do a section on soldering. Once I have done it I will send it to Ron to add anything he thinks I missed.

    Barry good job, keep soldering it's the only way to learn.

    If I can help in any way just ask!!!

    Enough of my rammble

    Regards

    Rob
  7. barry

    barry Active Member

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    Thanks Rob

    Using electrical solder.

    Bad cleaning I think (i know), and I need some new wire cutters

    barry
  8. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Barry

    Unless it is thick wire don't use wire cutters they leave apex cut on the wire that is almost impossible to get rid of at such a small scale. What I do is roll the wire under an old blade until it groves, then put the section you want to keep in a pair of pliers as close to the grove as possible and then bend the other end up and down until it snaps. If doing an angeld cut use a pair scissors. Pliers work on a crush cut, scissors work on a shear cut.

    Hope this helps

    Regards

    Rob
  9. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Barry

    These are all I use if I can't snap it.
  10. barry

    barry Active Member

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    Savage aft deckhouse

    Hi gang

    Not a lot done on the cardmodelling side today added the weather strips to the aft deckhouse and 2 little boxes at the front end on top which are tricky to do as the bigger one fits on the small one which overhangs the end and chopping those up into bits takes time.

    I also added mast Mk 2 not really right but good enough to test spray painting it with car body grey primer looks quite effective. I also managed a chimney with an "H" top on it. Cost a lot of swearing etc !! I did find that Jim's cotton rigging builder modified to a single strip but wire wrapped the same way seems to produce passable ships rails (so far)

    I bought myself a new printer / copier which is a cheapo HP psc 1355 colour printing is good especially when compared with my clapped out hp870 cxi which had coughed it's last for England etc.

    As Tim would say the paper path turns right back on itsself so 1 mm card comes out with a slight bend on it but it seems to drop out by itsself. The thing took about an hour to load it's software and pratt about, most day's I long for a bit of simplicity. I still have another disk full to load which does the photo side of it, but so far I am pleased with it.

    If any one on site happens to have a printer driver for an HP 1100c A3 printer I would be grateful for a copy of it.
  11. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

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    Ooooo, an A3 printer. Ah well, I can dream!

    Regarding soldering, have you noticed that whether your workshop is draughty or not, the weather is hot or cold, day or night, it makes absolutely no difference whatever; that little stream of flux smoke goes UNERRINGLY straight up your left nostril.

    Amazing...

    Tim P
  12. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi Barry

    Great work as always , love to see this build as the detail for such a small ship is brill, even given the scale of it.

    As for the printer try going on to hp's site they should have the driver for download!!

    I only use an old Epson 460 five years old and has never let me down yet and it's been well battered.

    More please

    Regards

    Rob
  13. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Tim

    Ever noticed, no matter how the thing is put down, it always points at you ready to burn off a limb :lol:
    They have a mind of there own!!

    Rob
  14. barry

    barry Active Member

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    Rob

    It's the only one they have no driver for looked everywhere on the net.

    Tim

    Soldering at the moment is getting up both nostrils whichever way the wind is blowing I keep looking at araldite or something at the moment I'm bloody hopeless at it.

    barry
  15. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Barry

    I might know a man that has one, I will ask over the weekend :wink: .

    DON'T GIVE UP ON THE SOLDERING, time is all you need.

    Stick a photo of the iron you use up for me please!!

    Regards

    Rob
  16. barry

    barry Active Member

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    savage solder

    Hi Rob

    I use the small one 30 watt the other is 100 watt got the kit cheap off a mate probably useless for modelling but it's great for other bits.

    barry
  17. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi Barry

    The iron on the right is the same as the one I use.

    In the photo it looks as if the tip in it is a spade type tip, if this is the case that explains why you are having trouble. Change the tip for a small fine point and you see a huge improvement inthe way the iron acts.

    To get a blob of solder on a spade tip requires a lot of solder, giving a thick covering. Small tip and blob and run the wire under the iron, it will work.

    Keep both irons as the big gun type is a very good thing to have.

    Regards

    Rob
  18. Maurice

    Maurice Member

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    Psst.....Barry....you can cheat a bit.
    8 amp fusewire for example is 0.27mm diam. and, rather handy this, already tinned.

    Cheers
    Maurice
  19. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

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    For soldering, I find the bigger the iron, the better. Long bits of metal like masts will conduct the heat away from the joint area really fast, so you need to get a lot of energy into the joint to melt the solder AND get the parts to the same temperature as well. Are you tinning the parts first? After cleaning them very thoroughly, wire wool is good for this, IMMEDIATELY apply some flux to protect the metal from finger grease, oxidation, etc. Make sure the iron tip is hot, dip it in the flux, then apply your solder wire to the tip; it should melt straight away, and provided the iron tip is clean and fluxed, the solder will 'wet' the surface. If it stays in a little molten blob, or worse, drops off, the iron is not clean enough, or fluxed. Put the tip of the iron on the part, firmly, and wait for the heat to spread into the part. The flux will start to boil and smoke, and then the solder will 'wet' the part as well. Carefully wipe the soldering iron tip along the part, leaving a bright, clean skin if molten solder. Remove the iron, and repeat for the next part. Again, if the solder forms little droplets rather than a smooth bright surface, the part was not hot enough, and/or the part was not clean or fluxed properly.

    Once you have a coating of solder on all the parts, you can place them together, dap a smear of flux on the contact point and just apply the soldering iron again. The solder will melt on both surfaces and flow together. Remove the iron, blow gently o cool the solder and bingo, joint jointed.

    I'll take some pics if anyone will find them useful.

    Tim P
  20. barry

    barry Active Member

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    Tim

    Thank you the more input the better I can see this lot having to be moved to "solder school". I've had a good laugh learning I got a bit better this afternoon but I don't think I will photograph the mod to the iron. As both you and Rob have said it was obvious I need to clean the bits better and use more flux.


    barry