Flying Scotsman

Discussion in 'Scratchin' & Bashin'' started by Cannonball, Dec 22, 2006.

  1. Mike14xx

    Mike14xx New Member

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    That makes me feel even more sorry for that beautiful piece of engineering history.
  2. CCT70

    CCT70 Member

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    Why's that? She's in GREAT hands it seems and is being rebuilt for mainline service. Can;t ask for more than that! :wave:
  3. ukon30fan

    ukon30fan 0n30 Rail Baron of Leeds

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    I'd recommend you visit the The National Railway Museum ( Not railroad please, we're british!) website and see the wonderful work that goes on there to maintain our railway heritage. much of the loco fleet is rotated around and lent out to what you call scenic railroads for trian rides.
    Nope, the Flying Scotsman couldn't be in better hands!
  4. Mike14xx

    Mike14xx New Member

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    No I feel sorry for it being stuck in the US. ukon30fan I am british im just stuck in the states. I never say railroads. Its RAILWAY.
  5. CCT70

    CCT70 Member

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    It was a pretty sad sight being pillaged and raped out at Sharpe Army Depot here in California, but she's home now in the good old U.K. where she belongs. At the Western Pacific RR Museum in Portola, CA where I volunteer at, we got an auction notice and invite to bid a couple of years ago when she went on the auction block, and just for grins, I pitched the idea of buying it at our board meeting. I wasn't serious, she does NOT belong in the states at a WP specific RR museum, but I thought it would be fun and they thought I was serious. You would have loved to have been a fly on the wall for THAT discussion! The language got pretty colorful, especially when they discovered I was only yanking their chains. :0)

    One of my ultimate life goals is to travel to the UK to see the beautiful country and catch the 4472 out on the mainline where she belongs. Thanks to the National RailWAY Museum (sorry guys!), now we all can enjoy the Scotsman in her element.
  6. 60103

    60103 Pooh Bah

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    History sidebar:
    Flying Scotsman was built by the Great Northern Railway in 1922, the third of the A1 class, numbered 1472. In 1923 the railways were "grouped" and Flying Scotsman passed to the LNER which added 3000 to the GN numbers, making it 4472.
    After WW2, the LNER started to renumber its locomotives and FS received 502, but before the scheme was completed (or even barely begun!) they came up with another system, and FS became 103. Someplace along the line, the class was improved, with higher boiler pressure and a steam dome shaped like a banjo case and became class A3. (the unimproved ones became class A10, because another engineer wanted to use class A1.) In 1948 the railways were nationalized and BR added 60000 to the LNER numbers, so it became 60103. Under BR it was painted black and then Brunswick green (original colour was apple green) and carried smoke deflectors at one time.
    When it was sold to Alan Pegler, it went back to being LNER 4472, and acquired a second tender.
    Second item: one of the oldest trains running out of London was the "10 am Scotch Express". This train was the prestige train running on the east coast lines to Edinburgh, and was nicknamed "The Flying Scotsman". The name was used as a locomotive name in 1922, but the loco and train did not always go together. Many of the locos were given corridor tenders to allow them to run non-stop from London to Edinburgh -- the engine crew changed over at the halfway point.
  7. Alan Bickley

    Alan Bickley Member

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    Southern RR, that "flying scot" that you have interests me: Is it actually HO scale?
  8. 60103

    60103 Pooh Bah

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    Alan: I think it was just standard Bachman OO scale stock; labelled HO for the North American market.
  9. Alan Bickley

    Alan Bickley Member

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    Oh, right. I thought as much anyway, seeing as there was mention in our society journal of a Hogwarts express set released by Bachmann in the US to HO scale which turned out to be OO instead. I suppose the scale would be a lot less noticeable next to the US loading gauge in HO.
  10. 60103

    60103 Pooh Bah

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    Alan: I think if Bachman had made British rolling stock in HO scale, they wouldn't be trying to flog it to the Americans first!
    The Hogwarts set was probably an older Hall model painted scarlet and a couple of older edition coaches (I have an original) with the lug holes in the sides and the seats deleted.
    Oh, and the wheels were spaced out a bit to match NMRA standards -- they weren't pushed in to the shoulders on the axles.
  11. Mike14xx

    Mike14xx New Member

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    CCT70 hate to burst your bubble but last time I was there about a year ago she would be undergoing restoration and she would become static display like Mallard.
  12. CCT70

    CCT70 Member

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    "The locomotive has now been withdrawn from service, as the current period of certification which legally allows it to run on the main line has expired. It will be completely dismantled and overhauled to the highest possible standards in order to re-certify it for the next seven to ten years. We are hoping to complete this process by late 2007 in order that the locomotive can be back hauling trains.

    Much of the overhaul will take place in the workshops at York, although various components will be sent to spe******t engineers all over the country. This means that visitors will be able to monitor progress from the viewing gallery above the workshops, although at times there may be only the frames and disassembled components to see.

    The Flying Scotsman Story Exhibition opened at the National Railway Museum in April 2006.

    According to the museum, they are going to rebuild it for service unless plans have changed recently.