From Plastics to Card Models

Capt_Doug61

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I've been a plastic kit modeler for over 50+ years. I am now considering making the switch to card models for several reasons. The cost of plastic kits and supplies has risen so much. Have any others in this group made the switch from plastic to paper? All thoughts on this topic are appreciated.
 
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micahrogers

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I am in the process of making the switch, I'm working thru my stash, and making small card models to build my skills as well. There are so any diverse subjects to build in card.
 

Capt_Doug61

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I am in the process of making the switch, I'm working thru my stash, and making small card models to build my skills as well. There are so any diverse subjects to build in card.
Thank you for the reply. I agree, so many interesting choices. For me too there is health factors with all the chemicals involved in building plastic kits. The plastic kit hobby has gotten terribly expensive. I too plan on starting with simple card kits to increase my skills.
 
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mijob

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When I was much younger I build plastic models, when I found the paper models that was a game changer for me.
 
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Rhaven Blaack

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I have been building paper/cardstock models since I was 13. The reason why I (initially) started building paper/cardstock models is because my family was poor and could not afford the models and toys that I wanted. The first model that I (scratch) built was a Colonial Viper. I used cigarette cartons, PVA glue, a cheap X-acto knife, cheap measuring equipment and some paint. I used a picture of a Colonial Viper from a picture book that I received as a gift, as a guide for proportions. It was not until 2009 that I found out about this site and got into building templates.

Throughout my years of model building, I have found that (depending on the genre) there are as many (and in some cases more) models available in paper/cardstock as there is in other mediums. Not only that but many of the paper/cardstock model templates can be just as (and in some cases more) details as other mediums.

There are so many aspects to paper/cardstock model building that make is a much better hobby over all, compared to other mediums (i.e. cost, materials, availability of templates vs kits, health benefits, The ability in correcting mistakes, and the list goes on).
Now, with that being said, I am not saying that the other mediums are bad, they are not. However I am saying that there are far more greater benefits to paper/cardstock model building than all other mediums combined.

Once again, welcome to paper/cardstock model building and welcome to Zealot!
 

Revell-Fan

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I too came from the plamo world and slowly switched to paper mainly due to the lack of availability of certain models. When I was building up a small collection of my favourite scifi ships I was sorely missing a Buck Rogers Thunderfighter. When I was exploring the (then) new internet I accidentally found the papercraft by Martin Saenger which was the first paper model I built in years. This experience changed my life. I never saw paper models as "second class models" but this particular one opened my eyes and showed me what you were able to do with paper. Before the TF I never thought it was possible to make something like this from just a few sheets with flattened out printed parts. The possibilities are truly endless and raise and fall only with the imagination and creativity of the designer.

I started to look for other models of the same quality and quickly found the Lower Hudson Valley gift shop with its great Real Space models. Then, a few weeks later I found Zealot and joined, mainly due to the "Jay's Galactica is lonely" thread started by the great team around nothing and Steve who were producing BSG models in some sort of a pipeline. I was amazed by their work and thought about giving something back to the community. So I started to make paper models myself with the Landram being the number one (albeit it was not the first one I released ;) ).

Recently plastic models have become very expensive which makes me think twice before buying a new one. The latest ones I got were the Revell Slave I (because it has a better surface texture than the old mpc model which I also have and which I intend to use to practise scribing, weathering etc. ;) ) and the Revell Razor Crest (you need at least one model with a toilet inside; OK, I admit, the coffee mug was the selling point for me to get the Hasbro Imperial Hover Tank :biggrin: ). Space is also an issue. Paper model plans only require some MBs on your hard drive. If you build one and run out of space you can always pass it on to someone else without regrets. And if you get more space later you can always rebuild the model, often will the result even be better than your first attempt because of the knowledge you obtained from building it in the first place.

One of the biggest advantages of paper models is that you can easily print and make as many models as you wish. Fixing a broken part is easy: Just print another part and attach. Then you are finally freed from exotic scaling. If you need a model in 1/72 but it is only available in 1/88 in plastic just find a paper template and print it at the desired scale. And you don't need to rig up a paint station because the papercraft already comes with a colourful texture. Of course you may recolour it in the PC or paint the finished model afterwards to make it look more authentic, it is all up to you. :)
 

zathros

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I am playing with my new 3D printer. In the time it took to make one hull, I could have made 10 out of paper. My final models will be plastic, with wood, paper, and anything else that works. If you take a piece of paper and dope it up with Crazy Glue, it becomes a composite material.

'You will enjoy the freedom paper gives you. We use water and compound curved objects with wet paper to get certain shapes. Almost anything is possible. There are many non-toxic, allergy choices for glue, like "ZIP DRY", and UHU glue products.
'
Welcome to Zealot. It's nice to have you aboard. ;)
 

Rhaven Blaack

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Thank you everyone for your inspiring feedback. It's this type of support from the paper modeling community that makes this such a great hobby.
You will find the members here are very helpful. SO, please do not be afraid to ask questions. This forum is dedicated to both sharing and learning.
I hope that you enjoy yourself here.
 
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Chuffy70

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@Capt_Doug61 Starting out in the plastic kit hobby as a kid, I was and still am a big hater of having to paint my models.

Enjoying construction first and foremost, but the painting side of the hobby left more and more projects un-finished.

The joy of card/paper models is that other than your own creations, most paper models come pre-rendered allowing the satisfaction of building rather than worrying about the paint, decals etc that hinder the most other forms of models. Cut, fold. shape, glue and "hey-presto!" a finished model!

I do dip my toe back into other mediums now and again, but I'm very much loving the joy and challenge papercraft has to offer.

Enjoy the challenge, but start small and simple, the learning curve is steep!