Trebuchet 1/25

Discussion in 'Armory & Military' started by carlos filipe, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    The trebuchet is a siege machine from the medieval warfare arsenal. It was an offensive weapon designed to smash walls, but it could also be used in defensive mode controlling access to sensitive areas suvh as a bridge to the castle or the gates itself.
    I’m not going to say more, there are plenty of references on the net and Osprey published an interesting book on the subject.

    I found a while ago this beautiful model done by the Dutch Sheila Mertens. It is a kind offer still available at:
    http://members.home.nl/papermodels/

    The texture is very attractive and the model very easy to build.
    It comes with a jig that is quite helpful.
    When assembled the model roughly measures 30 X 40cm (12” X 15”)
  2. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    I started the model for a Group Build of Portuguese Medieval Period in the forum:
    http://forum.modelismo-na.net/
    The period defined being from 1134 – our independence date – until 1420’s when the Portuguese started the conquest of some towns in what is nowadays Morocco.
  3. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    The construction starts with the base. Two A-frames back to back and two very long beams over it.
  4. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    That's a nice model, I look forward to seeing some pictures. I saw a special on Television that hard some excellent working trebuchets. It was astonishing to see how they could in fact take a castle or defense apart.
  5. Eric Ferguson

    Eric Ferguson Member

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    Just an FYI... What got me interested in Trebuchet's was the TV show, "Northern Exposure". Thet used a treb *twice*. Originally Chris was going to *fling* a cow till he found out Monty Python had done it (did a piano instead). Second time was to *fling* and bury in a lake, a coffin bearing a friend of his. Been looking at both model and *working* trebs ever since.
  6. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    [​IMG]

    Picture from Carlos Felipe's link.
  7. Eric Ferguson

    Eric Ferguson Member

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    One of the models I keep meaning to build, it's so gppd looking. Thought about building a working wooden version of this as well. Make the card part, then reproduce it in wood (another medium that I have no experience with...)

    Just as an FYI, one reason trebuchets were such excellent weapons. THey could hit the exact same spot repeatedly. Would weaken a stone wall till it fell. Watched a program that showed medieval weapons. Every stone ball fell within a couple of feet of each other. Amazing accuracy!
  8. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    I went to wikipedia and made this short version of the trebuchet’s:
    A trebuchet is a siege machine employed in the Middle Ages…” “ ... The counterweight trebuchet appeared in both Christian and Muslim lands around the Mediterranean in the 12th century. It could fling projectiles of up to three hundred and fifty pounds (140 kg) at high speeds into enemy fortifications.
    The trebuchet did not become obsolete until the 15th century, well after the introduction of gunpowder appeared in Europe in second half of 13th century.

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  9. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    The author provides a jig to help assemble the model straight. This proves to be vey helpuful, as with time, parts tend to warp as they are quite long.
    If you build this model please avoid my mistake: I was so excited assembling the beams I forgot to leave the face with the paper joint facing down. On those I didn’t the look is terrific, those I left the joint up look… terrible.

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  10. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    As suggested I added weight inside the counter-weight. Reinforced the box with thick cardboard and then plied a piece of lead sheet and taped in place. The arm swings perfectly acted by the weight. Not as violent as I imagine it would have been in the real thing that was able to throw a 300 pounds stone some half-mile to pound stone walls. It must have been nerve wreaking to the besieged population to listen the slow smashing and crumbling of the walls.
    I thought to add some figurines to give a notion of scale to the machine. Used Preiser’s 1/24 nude figurines, an excellent base for scracthbuilding. Initially two, now narrowed to only one (still unfinished…).
    I had a problem assembling the axle where the counterweight swings. The hole I drilled thru the assembly (the two supporting arms of the counterweight and the arm) is not correctly level, so it needs a little tweaking to assume a level position.

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  11. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    I simplified the scene and intend to use only one figurine. The initial sketch depicts a rookie on night watch, before the trebuchet is even fixed to the ground.
    The pose of the chosen figurine differed a little, so I’m working on it with a pose I remember to see in my youth when traveling to rural areas. A relaxed, confident, almost defiant pose. The pole was used as a defence weapon as late as the 40s of the XXth century. In popular fests, brawls could happen among the youth of rival villages…
    Actually there was for a while an attempt to turn it into a martial art, as a sport, but it died out.

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  12. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    I had a lot of doubts about the rigging and not yet convinced. I just went the Hollywood way: “making it look good”…
    The author proposes a sheave traveling on a rope. There is even a photo of a life-size model rigged that way, but it is hard for me to believe if it really worked .
    Then the model comes with two winches. Again there’s a life-size model done that way. Initially I thought it would serve to distribute the tension, but the rigging goes from one winch to the other thru a double- sheave (is this the correct expression?), but that also doesn’t make sense to me. One unrolling whilst the other wrap? I’m not a sailor, I cannot understand these matters.
    I made a new sheave with balsa and used a jewelry prop in wood to slide in the arm’s rope.

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  13. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    Building the base. I think the photos are self-explanatory. A piece of roofmate framed with heavy cardboard.
    The ground cover is a layer of Das-Pronto clay, a rather disappointing material that when dry turns into pinkish red, not clay (at least the one I’m familiar with).
    To seal the cardboard from moisture and give a little texture I applied two heavy coats of PVA glue. Brushed on and then hammered with the brush bristles on the vertical. After a light sanding, a cheap spray bought in a convenience store made the final finishing.

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  14. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    The finished model still without the figure. It is over 40cm tall (15.75’).
    The sling was done with lead foil. the author suggests a net, but as lether was also used, I went for the easy way...
    Now is missing the figurine...
    Wish all a Happy New year.

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  15. Dented Rick

    Dented Rick Human

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    Happy New Year Carlos, EXCELLENT Work.

    one Question, does it work? :D
  16. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Beautiful workmanship!! I don't think you are capable of less! :)
  17. Brett

    Brett New Member

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    Szia!
    Szép nagy modell! Mintha fából lenne. Gratulálok!
  18. Zathros

    Zathros Guest


    Hi!
    Beautiful model, great! If you would like wood. Congratulations!


    Translation of above post.


    I wouldn't mind something to toss my balls around.!:thumb:
  19. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    Hi:
    The author says the model can throw marbles, but she warns it is not advisable to that as it will break the model after a couple of throws.
    I tried to find pine or other more resilent wood with the same section, but conclude I would have to to trim them to the right dimension and I don't have the right tools. Bought balsa with the right dimensions, tinted them to look like aged oak wood, but still undecided as to go or not forward with it.
    The model is very simple. I hope I didn't gave the feeling it is dificult to build. I got entangled with the rigging, but the construction itself is a weekend project. The textures are beautiful. So the author -Miss Sheila Mertens - deserves most of the compliments for doing such a fine project.
    Regards
    Carlos
  20. ted181

    ted181 New Member

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    very nice model. It would be good just to test fire it :thumb: