The joys of prototype freelancing!

Discussion in 'HO Scale Model Trains' started by River Run, Jul 16, 2008.

  1. River Run

    River Run New Member

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    Nobody can tell me...."THEY DIDN'T MAKE THAT!"

    River Run Road M420R and GP38-2M diesels under construction. :thumb:

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  2. eightyeightfan1

    eightyeightfan1 Now I'm AMP'd

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    Ahhhhhhh.......

    But they did......


    Scan from Contempoary Diesel Spotters Guide(c. 1995 Louis Marre)

    Attached Files:

  3. Sarge_7

    Sarge_7 Member

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    That's what I like about having my freelance road too. The projects are looking good:thumb::thumb:
  4. River Run

    River Run New Member

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    I call the GP38 my GP38-2M. The cab I used is an old Smokey Valley North American Cab intended for the UP SD-60M. If you look at the cab of the GMD SD40-2F you'll notice the cabs are very similar, both having the protruding brow over the windshields and the extra side windows. I bent history a little in that my River Run had placed an order with GMD in 1987 for 10 GP38-2s and when visiting the plant in London, Ontario spied the new cabs being applied to the CN SD40-2Fs and requested the same cabs for their order making them GP38-2Ms beating the Union Pacific having these cabs on their SD-60Ms. One of the fun facets of Prototype Freelancing is making up stories and scenarios to go along with your part of Liliput.
  5. eightyeightfan1

    eightyeightfan1 Now I'm AMP'd

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    I noticed the difference in the side window arrangement. They look so close,(and if they have the same pic with them when visiting your layout), no one will notice. Unless they are rivet counters, do notice the difference(we know how rivet counters can be), and say something, in which case you can tell them your story and promptly remove them from the layout room...
    I would......
    (I have a C44-9W, and an SD70M in New Haven paint schemes.....Man did that cause a ruckus at NHRRTS, when a member there saw pics of them.)




    Oh....Cool kitbash, can't wait to see them painted.
  6. Packers#1

    Packers#1 Ultimate Packers Fan

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    Looks really good.
  7. Triplex

    Triplex Active Member

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    The M420R and the real GP38-2W had 4-window Canadian safety cabs. This GP38-2W has a 3-window early US EMD safety cab. Weren't the first CP SD40-2Fs delivered in 1988?

    Unfortunately, the JPEG artifacting in your photos is so severe that I can't make out what production phase the GP38-2 is. Does it have wire-mesh radiators or raised corrugated radiators? I think it has the corrugated style, which makes it a Phase 2 (basically, late 70s) GP38-2. A Dash 2 from, IIRC, late '82 on would be Phase 3, with an angular blower duct like on an SD50/60.

    What I'm saying is, I like your model, but it can't pass for a possible new-build GP38-2W. A rebuild, yes.
  8. TinGoat

    TinGoat Ignorant know it all

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    Canadian Safety Cabs

    "By the end of 1977, the Canadian National Ry. had at least 51 GP38-2 units equipped with this optional "Safety Cab"..."

    In Canadian terms, "M" means "Modified": Usually pertaining to an engine or electrical control upgrade.

    "W" is the designation for "Wide" Cab a.k.a. Canadian Safety Cab.

    Canadian National Railway pioneered the Safety Cabs, just like they pioneered the Canadian All Weather Cabs on Steam engines.

    GP40-2LW 9410 - West Toronto Junction - 03/02 - {Photo Ron Wm. Hurlbut}

    GP40-2W 9508 - West Toronto Junction - 03/02 - {Photo Ron Wm. Hurlbut}

    The first photo shows that the Safety Cab dates back to the 70's...

    Attached Files:

  9. River Run

    River Run New Member

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    That's why I like FREELANCING, I can call it a ERS-2000M if I want to. I really would have rather used the cab you show, But at the prices charged, I couldn't afford it. I'm retired. I used the Smokey Valley Union Pacific SD-60M Cab because it was only $6.75.
  10. TinGoat

    TinGoat Ignorant know it all

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    M, W, or SC...

    Right On! I really like Freelancing too. Anyone can buy RTR, but scratching and bashing is where the fun is. But I also like to follow a certain amount of prototype practice to give things some plausability.
  11. jbaakko

    jbaakko Active Member

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    I think a GP38-2M is viable, the W and LW were a Canadian thing. M to EMD means wide cab.
  12. jbaakko

    jbaakko Active Member

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    On the free-lanced subject, I've always want to see a Dash 9-60C (C60-9), or an AC6000C (hence a standard cab, not wide), or an SD90AC/SD80AC (spartan cabbed...). Heck a an AC4400B would be nifty...

    I want some M-K safety cabs though, I want a fleet of MK5000C's, say, a dozen? I'd love to paint them up for my dad's railroad, like they invested in a large number of them.
  13. River Run

    River Run New Member

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    I'm gonna scratch the GP38-2M. There are too many what ifs, and it's too modern for my era. I just found a 4 window canadian cab and I'm gonna change the radiators and filter box to backdate the shell.