Railfanning the JGL, 6/30/64

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by Gary Pfeil, Apr 18, 2008.

  1. steamhead

    steamhead Active Member

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    Wow...The fireman's side on this baby looks like a pipe factory..!!! I see a humongous pipe going from what I think is the steam dome and into the forward end beside the stack....I have never seen this on other steamers. What is it..?

    Keep these great pictures coming...!!!
  2. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Gus, that's an external dry pipe, which takes the saturated steam (at about 380 def. F.) from where it collects in the steam dome, to the superheater, where its temperature is raised even further, to anywhere from 600 to 750 deg. F. At this temperature, the steam can do even more work, as dry steam occupies 1600 times the volume of the same weight of water at atmospheric pressure. :eek: On most locos, this pipe is inside the boiler.

    Wayne
  3. steamhead

    steamhead Active Member

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    Hey Wayne...Thanks for the info. If the point is to super-heat the steam, moving it out in the "open air" would have it drop in temperature while it gets to where it's going....Or does it matter, once it gets there..?
  4. UP SD40-2

    UP SD40-2 Senior Member

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    Gary, WOW!:eeki: , TRULY some SLAP FANTASTIC engines/work & pics:bravo: .

    [​IMG] -Deano
  5. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    I've been searching through my binder of Trains articles on steam, as I recall reading somewhere why the NYC opted for an external dry pipe, but I can't seem to locate the info. That pipe would have been heavily lagged, so I don't think that the heat loss would be too great. Also, when superheated steam loses some of its heat, it still retains its pressure, and therefore, its ability to do work. Saturated steam, when it loses any heat, begins to condense, with a corresponding loss of pressure.

    Wayne
  6. steamhead

    steamhead Active Member

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    Thanks for the info, Wayne....Little by little I'm getting an idea of how these things work..!! :thumb:
  7. Gary Pfeil

    Gary Pfeil Active Member

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    Thans Wayne for answering Gus's question, and more thoroughly than I would've.

    Thanks for the kind words Deano!

    Gus, here are some photos of the other side.
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    [​IMG]
  8. steamhead

    steamhead Active Member

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    Thanks Gary.....I had to go get the drool bucket again...!!!
    Great model....!!!

    A couple of days ago I took out the Mike kit I have (I've had it for about 1-1/2 yrs...)and looked through it....Checking out what "goodies" I've got to "upgrade" it. Bad sign.....
  9. cn nutbar

    cn nutbar Member

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    Hi Gary---You sure have some beautiful steam locomotives---I really like the look of the pumps on the front of the smoke box on that Mike---looks similiar to the locomotives on the Great Northern---You know if I wasn't such a CN nut I'd be adding some of those engines to my roster :thumb:
  10. Gary Pfeil

    Gary Pfeil Active Member

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    Thanks guys. CN, with that beautiful fleet of locos you have I would think it fairly easy to resist the impulse to start buying other roads power. Ha, I do understand the powerful draw though! Discipline my man!