MOPAC Covered Hoppers

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by rockislandmike, Nov 29, 2002.

  1. rockislandmike

    rockislandmike Active Member

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    I've been working on a number of rolling stock projects. This is a trio of MOPAC covered hoppers. All arrived as MP 716023.

    I left one as is; I changed another to MP 716215 with a screaming eagle logo instead of the buzzsaw; and the final one I changed to another of the MOPAC's reporting marks, CEI 716723 (and their accompanying buzzsaw logo). Added some graffiti, weathered 'em, and ta-da. I think they turned out really kewl, and quickly gives me three covered hoppers for Missouri Pacific customers.

    Attached Files:

  2. rockislandmike

    rockislandmike Active Member

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    Closeup of MP 716215.

    Attached Files:

  3. davidstrains

    davidstrains Active Member

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    Mike,

    Like your modeling. I am also doing some MP as a part of my layout. What was the time period for the circle logo vs. the eagle? I am doing the 40-50's time frame and while it is freelance I would like to be reasonable with the engines and rolling stock that is available. I am using 40' boxes, refers and cattle cars but I don't know much about other cars such as hoppers,gondolas, flats, tank cars, etc.

    Thanks,
  4. Tyson Rayles

    Tyson Rayles Active Member

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    Looks very real Mike! :cool:
  5. rockislandmike

    rockislandmike Active Member

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    I'm modeling 1980, but the following information I've uncovered will probably be most useful to you. PS - if you have any other questions, feel free to ask: most of the research I've done is around the late 70's, early 80's, but I might be able to answer some questions. You also might wanna watch eBay for an OER in your time frame (I've got one from October 1981, it's been an *invaluable* resource), **OR** might I recommend a couple of books: Patrick C. Dorin's "Missouri Pacific Lines Freight Train Services and Equipment" (includes many rolling stock pics, *and* freight equipment in 1956!!!), and Kevin EuDaly's "Missouri Pacific Diesel Power" (self-explanatory, follows each loco through its purchase).

    PAINT SCHEME INFO:

    Jenks Blue: In 1961, MP abandoned the "Route of the Eagles" blue and gray for a new paint scheme - a solid blue, 3 inch side stripes, two 3 inch-wide chevrons on both the nose and rear, small numbers on the upper center of the long hood, and the buzzsaw decal under both cab windows with sublettering for which sub the engine belong to if not by he parent (i.e. T&P, C&EI, M-I), and a two-digit number that identified the locos's model.

    Turbo Eagle: Starting in 1964, the same dark blue started to adorn turbocharged units, but with a large distinct eagle adorning the long hood, its wings fully shaped, and horizontal lines stretching back from these curved wings. "Missouri Pacific" in white in a red circle on the cab, road number in smaller letters on the top of the long hood, above the eagle logo.

    Turbocharged locomotives include all GE switchers and road engines, and all 35, 39, 40, 45, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 series engine from EMD (the GP15T was also turbocharged, but the GP15 and GP15-1 were not). EMD switchers are normally aspirated.

    Flying Eagle Buzz Saw: In 1974 the buzzsaw herald was replaced with the new eagle logo, and a large roadnumber applied to the sides, replacing the large eagle. On some older models, this last step was skipped resulting in the "double eagle" scheme. The 1974 scheme revisions included: the 3-inch stripes and chevrons were changed to 5-inches wide; the turbo-eagles were replaced by large numbers BN-style on all units; and the buzzsaw decal giveway to the eagle-buzzsaw under the cab windows - the first time the new company logo was applied to any MP rail equipment. It wouldn't be until 1978 that this logo would find its way onto the sides of rolling stock. Also, units with the new 1974 treatment often did not receive the white chevrons on the rear face of the long hood.
  6. davidstrains

    davidstrains Active Member

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    Thanks Mike. I'll look for those books and do the eBay search also. I also think I'll try the web to see if I can find any history that might have that info also.:) :)
  7. rockislandmike

    rockislandmike Active Member

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  8. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Mike - that's some pretty cool weathering! I like the graffiti too. How about a shot of those babies on your layout !?

    :D Val
  9. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

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    Hi Mike, excellent workmanship on the weathering, looks rather good to me.
    Shamus[​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  10. eightyeightfan1

    eightyeightfan1 Now I'm AMP'd

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    Excellent modeling.
    Looks like you use my favorite weathering medium...Rustall!
    Of course the better half always says"Why do you have to make it look old?"
    Thats life ......
  11. rockislandmike

    rockislandmike Active Member

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    Actually, no, it's just rust-colored paint. Took a wire and put a dab on the car, then brushed downward with a dry brush. Turned out pretty kewl, and I got the idea from a book called "Freight Car Projects".