Klishêshima

Discussion in 'N / Z Scale Model Trains' started by carlos filipe, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    SCALE: 1/150- JAPANESE N SCALE
    LAYOUT DIMENSIONS: 1100 X 400mm
    TRACK: Peco code 80
    TURNOUTS: Peco Setrack, just two manually operated in the staging yard..
    THROTLE: analogic, a Gaugemaster handheld WS. Power supply is a small transformer 220V/AC into 12V DC, like the ones to load mobile phones.
    LAYOUT PRESENTATION: Boxed diorama lighted with LEDs in stripes
    “STORY”:
    A rural line somewhere in Japan in an undetermined time. It could be today or 40 years ago. The trams go through the landscape serving a quiet rural area connecting people to the nearby Big City. Nevertheless rural life goes on, indifferent to the tourists looking for recreation, hiking along the wild river.
    OPERATION:
    It can hardly be called that. It is a single line and this particular halt doesn’t even have na extra track allowing trains to cross. So the only one train shows at a time in the layout. Then shows up another from the opposite direction and so on.
    I’m building this layout with exhibitions in mind and have noticed that the viewers interest fades away when I started with maneuvers in previous layouts. So this time I’ll try to keep the trains running. I can even let a train in a merry go round so I have time to chat with the viewrs. Maybe one day I’ll install a system to operate the trains on an automatic mode

    FLEET:
    One single tram, a double unit and a maintenance train. I want to test if three units are enough to keep up the interest.
  2. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Carlos, try and upload the picture again. I am not sure why it did not upload. If it does not work, send me another P.M. or e-mail, and I will ask the I.T. guys.
  3. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Carlos, still working on it. For other members, here is the picture Carlos Felipe is trying to upload.

    Wow, these are really cool! What scale are they?

    Attached Files:

  4. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    SOURCE OF INSPIRATION:
    This theme is totally new for me. Found some inexpensive models that led to research about the prototypes.
    Regrettably never been in Japan (seems to be a very nice country to visit), it is not easy for a gaijin to capture the essence, especially one that makes a virtual visit thru the net.
    Hence the title Klishêshima, the clichet of my Japan. A postcard where I mix Hiroshige printings with contemporary photos.
    Since I’m doing proto-freelancing (as I read once in a Model Railroader) I chose a to depict a timeless setting. The cars on the layout are from the 60s, but they could be form a car collector…
    The trams date back from the 30s or 40s, but there are many lines still operating old rolling stock.
    As a guide I studied the work of some Japanese modelers, hoping they would choose the right composition elements to their works.
    I have in high regard the works of:
    Kondoura :
    http://photozou.jp/photo/top/172544
    I couldn’t find a site or blog address. Found though the Kiso Modular Club, where he is active member along other excellent modelers.
    http://kiso-mc.com/index.html
    O. Moro:
    http://members.jcom.home.ne.jp/a.moro/
    Akihiro Morohoshi builds micro-layouts in a playful way. It is worthwhile to visit his site.
    I recently found these very helpful four videos where O. Moro builds a simple layout. Although in Japanese, one can understand how the author worked the composition and turns a simple oval into a very sophisticated work of art.
    motorizing GM models
    part 1
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Th5cpW-jqrg&feature=related

    [YOUTUBE]Th5cpW-jqrg[/YOUTUBE]
    part2
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AX6MDnNf2EE&feature=related
    [YOUTUBE]AX6MDnNf2EE[/YOUTUBE]
    part 3
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5O7sv_E9Zk&feature=related

    [YOUTUBE]B5O7sv_E9Zk[/YOUTUBE]part 4
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaKip05l4bk&feature=related

    [YOUTUBE]kaKip05l4bk[/YOUTUBE]

    yuta atelier:
    http://www.yutaatelier.com/101115kisekae2E.html
    Yutaka Nakai builds micro-layouts that seem simple, but are not easy to achieve. Their minimalism is so refined that it isn’t easy to follow (replicate).

    Three modelers with different styles.
    I only contacted Morohishi to ask further details about his “Nostalgic Box”, the title of the work on the videos. He was very kind to take some time to reply and with humor noted that micro-layouts are like bonsais, a cultural Japanese thing.

    photo 1. A sketch of my project
    Photo 2.A detail of one of the modules of H0m (12mm gauge) of Kondoura
    Photo 3. A micro-layout from Morohishi aka O. Moro in H0n30
    Photo 4.One micro form Yutaka in On30 or H0n30

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  5. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    As I mentioned I go form Hiroshige's printings to contemporary Japan in photo documents

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  6. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    There are still some rural electrified lines. JR sold them when cuting the fat as nowadays they say the world of finance. Most of them survive with dificulties as traffic decreases in favour of the road and the private car.
    The outlook can be deceiving as - in a typical japanese approach - the CTC seem to be very sophisticated. Most of the lines are single, the crossings are done on some stations, wich implies a very efficient traffic management.
    There is a line serving the suburbs of Kyoto (a recent built line) that many of the stations (no more then a covered pier and an automatic ticketing booth) are single track.
    I use the expression rural lines, but many of them start in towns and then follow trhu the countryside (a definition that defies our understanding as agricultere activities are next door or in between suburban lots.
    But many of them keep on with rolling stock dating form 30s. Circulating either in single units or double units, they're ideal for small layouts

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  7. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    JUST 1.10 X 0.45M? WHY?!
    It allows me to work seated.
    It is very light. As it is now, only the basic forms of the terrain and the track laid, it weighs 3.00kgs. I’m hoping to keep it between 5 and 6 kilos.
    It is a small project that I hope will take me no more than 3 months to finish.
    It is easy to store and carry. I don’t have a car, but if I call a cab, the guy is not going to faint or insult me if I show up with a box this size as luggage.
    It is a budget controlled project. This time I bought all stuff (piece by piece during one year), only then started building the layout.
    Well, bought almost everything…
    Forgot a couple o things that made me stop whilst waiting for them.
    Nevertheless is much more fun to have everything home and proceed nonstop (or almost…)
  8. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    THE JAPANESE MODELS
    I have no idea how it is in the US, but here in Europe it is Kato everywhere (mainly European and American models). Tomytec and Tomix are hard to find. GreenMax difficult to get and Tsugawa (the Caramel motorization) if you want it you have to order from Japan direct.
    The models are not so sophisticated as the American or the Europeans, except for the excellent running. But this allows purchasing for reasonable prices. It is up to the modeler to upgrade according to his budget. I find it an interesting concept, especially on these difficult days we’re going thru.
    GABARIT
    Japanese gabarit difers from ours (US and European). Kato has a gauge tool, but at least in Portugal is hard to find.
    I included in my design a tunel portal. I was tempted to use an European; luckly I had the patience to wait to get a Japanese one. And good I did it as it is higher 1cm. That is a lot in N scale.
    The same happened with the catenary masts. They have different dimensions. I bought some from Dapol only to realize that they’re shorter then Kato, the ones I’m using in the layout.
    THE CHOICE OF THEME
    When we think of Japanese trains it immediately comes to mind the shinkansen. But to model such theme is to have to cope with the same problems one finds modeling regular American or European railways. Long trains, complex track layout, signaling…
    These rural lines served by trams offer a chance to build believable small size layouts. I know there are different understandings as what is small on the two sides of the Atlantic…
    But what I’m looking for is a type of layout that I can finish in a short period and move on to the next project.
  9. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    THE STRUCTURES
    I simplified the initial plan that included two farmhouses, a barn and smalll station shelter, to just a farmhouse and the station shelter. I started with a layout measuring 1200 X 450mm and shrunk it to 816 X 410mm. By removing the double track from the station I wasn't going to need so much space. Anyhow, when I started laying the track I let it speak by itself, meaning to let the curves acquire the radius that would hold without too much pressure.
    That end up with the expansion of the layout to the present length of 1010mm.
    Using insulating foam is very practical. I could change the dimensions by simply adding more foam.
    I laid the track directly over the insulation foam, holding it in place with toothpicks. Trimmed them down util the rail height so I could perform testruns. After a couple of days the shape stabilized and I could glue the rails with a mix of PVA glue, wet water (water with dishwashing soap), pigments and natural soil. This way I have kind of a subroadbed. I can now glue the ballast; if some of it gets loose, what is seen is dark brown underneath, not some odd blue. from previous experiences, after the ballast, the track sits rock hard without the need for nails.
    In the last photo I use the longest vehicle I have. I'm not going to use it here as it looks out of place with radius of 130mm.

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  10. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    THE STRUCTURES 2
    I'm using a minka from Tomytec. The minka is a traditional farmhouse from Japan, this one has a tetched roof. Interesting about this typology is that when a house is too old to renovate, they just remove the timber they can still in condition and use it in a new house. It is as if they're bringing the spirits of their ancestors to their new house.
    I have done minor improvements to the model, including the wood boards on the roof top. Packed it wrong and they broke...
    I still have to do some retouch on the paint job and replace the base by something more discreet. I might omit the walls as they look a little outdated. I cannot find references to help me with this.
    Tomytec models come already assembled and painted, requiring some touch-up.
    The arched bridge is from GreenMax. The bigger tunel mouth is also from GreenMax.
    The catenary is from Kato.
    The telegraph poles are form Tomytec.

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  11. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    THE SCENERY BUILD UP
    Over the insulation foam I used polyurethane foam in spray. It is a difficult material to control as it expands. But that can be helpful. Gave me a notion of the final volumes of the tree canopy. I temporarily placed the catenaries so I could check clearances. Now I have guidelines for the contours. The foam is easily cut with a regular knife.
    The geology of Japan has some strange features. I grew up looking at printings depicting rock outcrops growing vertically. I thought it was a style of representation, after all it is a very realistic representation of nature.
    I'm exploring those features to create view blocks that break in sections the view of the trams passing by.

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  12. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    THE ARCHED WOODEN BRIDGE
    It was a fun mini-project. GreenMax's kits are made of styrene and unpainted. So one can play a little with it. The reference photos showed bridges painted red (even the pavement) or in bare wood. The kit box showed railings in red and wooden pavement in natural finish. I got lost and tried out a red pavement with the paint peeling with the use.
    The texture of the wood planks was done with a miniature saw.
    The wood colors airbrused with several tones and the fiber replicated with watercolor pencils.
    After protecting the work with fixative spray I went for the red floor airbrushing.
    masking
    The peeling effect was done using salt as a mask. The color is a mix of matt red and transparent red from Tamiya.
    The knobs were brush painted with a mix of matt green and transparent green. The final result gives a translucent finish.

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  13. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    IMPROVING THE LOOK OF THE ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE FROM TOMYTEC
    The Convex comes with two cars, one boxcar/caboose and low sides (sorry now I cannot remember the american expression for this type of car).
    The locomotive is sold as a static model with plastic wheels. Tomix provides the right motorization and to my surprise you just have to unclick the underframe with the plastic wheels and click-in the motorized chassis. No need for screws, the manufactring standards are so tight that everything falls in together very easy.
    There are no working lights, but the Japanese concept seems to be offering a basic product for a very affordable price and then is up to the modeler to customize it the way he likes.
    The only thing I cannot understand is why not chemically darkened wheels? they are shiny discs that demand to disassemble them to try to disguise a little that awful look.
    I also bought a new pantograph form Tomix. they come in pairs, so one kit allows me to detail two trams. They are not functional, but look very good after a little weathering

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  14. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Can I come over and play? Holy cow!! You are a very knowledgeable person. I had a way too large "N" scale layout some 26 years ago. I saved everything after I took it down. This whole concept is new to me, this micro world "slice" of life. I think I just have found something to do with this train stuff. I have an old 4-40 Locomotive, various bridges, walkways, miniature "N" scale cars people animals, etc. that are begging for attention. Thanks for this experience. Please keep us updated. The video clips remind me of a Miyazaki Anime movie. Wonderful little world's to get lost in. Definitely worth watching. :)
  15. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    Thank you Zathros:
    I hope you go forward with that project, since you have already the most expensive part of it, the rolling stock.
    I enjoy layouts where one can maneuver, but to just seat back and watch a train passing by on a beautiful stretch of landscape is kind of soothing. And when you have a 11 old kid, it will easily turn into a father and son project.
    Thank you also for your help in troubleshooting the bug, so i could go on with this thread.
    Rgds
    Carlos
  16. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    The Admin, Stephen, is the one who gets credit for fixing up the mess that was left behind!
  17. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    Hi Zathros and Steven:
    "To Caesar what's from Caesar".
    Sorry I was crediting another person, I meant no harm.
    Rgds
    Carlos
  18. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    No offense taken, I am not sure you are capable of offending anyways! :)

    Oh, I spent a REAL LONG time looking at those videos of miniature trains set dioramas, and of course, once I got to YouTube, it went on for a couple of hours! My wife was not amused. :)
  19. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    I started covering the foam. Usually I use spackling... (now I cannot recall the right term in english...), but this time I opted for Das Pronto a clay that hardens very tough, enduring handling much better. Used white for the rock formations and another tagged as clay, with a strange reddish color.
    The way to work is different, the material is kind of rubbery to handle, it is hard for me to achieve the delicate detail I got used with gypsum.

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  20. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    For the ground cover I use real clay soil and pastel chalks.

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