kitbashed headend equipment

Discussion in 'Scratchin' & Bashin'' started by doctorwayne, Oct 15, 2005.

  1. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Thanks for posting these, Mister Nutbar. My monitor is not the best, but your pictures seem to show the detail better than mine. I may have to offer you a job as Company Photographer. :wink:

    Wayne
  2. ross31r

    ross31r Member

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    now that first car is impressive - take it its a horse car?

    trussrod underframes - thats something i hadnt considered for the Harrimans! would allow me to put a lot more "junk" under the frames as well - might give the diner a more prototypical "busy" look as its such a small (comparatively) car for its type.
  3. cn nutbar

    cn nutbar Member

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    not headend equipment,but thanks to doctor wayne's skills,another fine example of his kit-bashing talents

    [​IMG]
  4. cn nutbar

    cn nutbar Member

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    another view of the Mount Resplendent---check out the railings

    [​IMG]
  5. Glen Haasdyk

    Glen Haasdyk Active Member

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    Just one question Wayne, When did CN change from an all olive-green paint to the green/ black and gold scheme on the passenger cars and was it applied to olny the smooth sides or to the heavyweights as well?
  6. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Ross, Mister Nutbar's first picture is indeed a horse express car: I built it for him after he saw my version of the same car (the very first picture in this thread), which I built from a photo of a Grand Trunk car in a book lent to me by Mister Nutbar.
    The Harriman cars would not have ever had a truss rod underframe. I'm not sure when they were first built, but they were developed by the Harriman lines as an early, all-steel lightweight car. Canadian National had quite a few wooden, truss rod cars that received steel underframes and also retained their truss rods, as well as truss rod cars that lost the truss rods when a steel underframe was applied. Some of these cars also received steel sheathing: those that lost their truss rods looked very much like all-steel heavyweights, as the arched windows on the wooden cars were often plated over at the same time.
    If you want a wooden car with truss rods, yet still want to keep the car fairly short, MDC makes (made?) some short, open platform cars that you might find suitable. My LHS has quite a few of these in stock, so they may be back in production, otherwise, there should be plenty about.
    I'm using mine in work service, representing older cars retired from passenger service, so the paint scheme is pretty bland.

    Postal (with some windows plated-over)
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    Combine (with windows added in the baggage section)
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    Coach (with some windows plated over)
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    These cars scale out at about 56' in length. Note the two different roof styles: all cars are available in either style. The roof on the coach predates the other two. If these cars were in regular passenger service, they would have battery boxes in addition to the truss rods and brake gear, or maybe Pintsch gas tanks for lighting. No a/c on these late 1800s cars. You could close in the vestibules to update the cars to the turn-of-the-century era.

    Glen, CNR first used the green/black/gold scheme in 1954: I believe the first cars were part of a very large order of lightweight smooth-sided cars from Pullman-Standard. Many heavyweights were repainted to this scheme, including some head-end stuff. One of the 40' steel express boxcars is shown on page one of this thread, and the 40' 8 hatch, over-head bunker express reefers also received this scheme. To the best of my knowledge, none of the wooden passenger equipment was ever painted in the green/black/gold.

    Wayne
  7. MilesWestern

    MilesWestern Active Member

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    What type of car is the Mt. Resplendant?
  8. ross31r

    ross31r Member

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    Just what i was going to say!!! looks like some kind of prototype kit-bashed sightseeing car.

    And Wayne - i have a trio of those Overland cars already (coach, cobine and obs) which are used as a preserved tourist train. Along with a couple of work-car kitbashes from the even smaller Overton cars.

    Will try and find a picture or the MoW "pickup coach" i built from one of these Overtons and post it up here.
  9. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    CNR called Mt. Resplendent and her sisters "mountain observation cars". They were built from coaches and featured large open observation platforms on both ends, and were used on trains running through the Rockies.
    Mister Nutbar's car is made from a Rivarossi coach, with the missing parts cut away with a razor saw. The end railings are from Scale Structures Ltd., and the railings along the sides are fabricated from brass wire. If I recall correctly, the window glass is original, and still part of the roof, with the unnecessary parts removed, then styrene blinds added. The underbody is unmodified. Paint is Accupaint, with C-D-S lettering.

    Wayne
  10. cn nutbar

    cn nutbar Member

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    can't help myself

    sorry doc---when i saw that MOW equipment i could'nt resist posting these cars you built for me

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  11. Glen Haasdyk

    Glen Haasdyk Active Member

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    Thanks for the paint scheme info. I'm going to re-paint my Athearn heavyweights since I first did them when I was 17 (18 years ago!) and my efforts weren't very good. I'm thinking of painting them all in the older green colors since I'm modeling 1957-59 and a fictional CNR subdivision at that.
  12. ross31r

    ross31r Member

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  13. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Neat little car. The open door is a very useful way of changing the appearance of any passenger car, but especially one in non-revenue service.
    Although it's not readily apparent in this photo, in addition to the open baggage doors, the top part of the dutch-doors at the end of the car are modelled in the open position. Perhaps I should position a couple of LPRs (little plastic railfans) in the vestibule to make that feature more noticeable.
    [​IMG]

    If I'm not mistaken, the CNR had some 80' wooden cars that were cut down in a manner similar to yours, for use as boom cars. Some of the horse express cars shown earlier in this thread were cut right down to flatcars in the latter part of their lives, also for work train service.

    Wayne
  14. ross31r

    ross31r Member

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    actually a few months after id made the car i brought a book about interurbans and what should i find but a picutre of an almost identical car in the book. forget which line it was from now but made me think that i might have got the idea right in the first place.

    Thinking of taking the two big tanks off and using them under then floor of my diner. Havent taken any new pictures of the car but i have added detailing to it since the photo was taken.
  15. Glen Haasdyk

    Glen Haasdyk Active Member

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    CN Cut down at least 1 steel car to make a boom car, I've been told it was retired and resides somewhere near kamloops. I've got an old Riverossi RPO that I'm planning to use to model it.
  16. cn nutbar

    cn nutbar Member

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    hi glen---i found a picture taken by David Stremes in a book titled "Canadian National Color Guide to Freight and Passenger Equipment " by John Riddell---the car was converted from a cn baggage car with two open end platforms.hopefully this helps with your planned conversion

    [​IMG]
  17. Glen Haasdyk

    Glen Haasdyk Active Member

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    Sort of, but the model I'm working on has at least half of the car cut down to clear the 120ton crane that goes along with it. my plan is to chorten the riv. RPO and cut the small door and window section down, leaving the larger door section intact for equipment storage.
  18. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    As promised (or threatened):D :D earlier, here are a few cars built from the Rivarossi
    12-1 Pullman car. Where required, windows were replaced with those offered by New England Rail Service. Air conditioning ducts are from either NERS or scratchbuilt, while underbody details are by Precision Scale, NERS, or scratchbuilt.

    First up is 56 seat coach Cayuga. Most of these cars have the a.c. duct crossing over near the middle of the car, a quick way to use up the extra ends that come with the NERS kit. Another 56 seat coach, Oneida, has an identical window arrangement, but a different a.c. duct layout.
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    Here's Oneida:
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    Sister car Mohawk is a 48 seat car, with an additional, small, 6 seat smoking section.
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    [​IMG]

    Onondaga is a 64 seat coach, with half-blind vestibules at both ends: another 64 seat car, Seneca, has the same window layout, but regular vestibules with doors on both sides. The main difference, internally, is the washroom layout.
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    [​IMG]

    Here's Seneca:
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    Tuscarora, a solarium/lounge, is the usual tailcar for this train. She's a 54 seat coach, with a 14 seat solarium/observation section.
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    The end railing is from SS Ltd.
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    Here is a couple of shots of the underbody of Tuscarora
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    [​IMG]

    I hope that you enjoy these photos.

    Wayne
  19. cn nutbar

    cn nutbar Member

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    great shots doc---glad to see you back on line
  20. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Here are a couple of cars that were shown previously, each accompanied this time by an underbody photo.

    First is CNR baggage car 8355 (built from an Athearn Pullman)
    [​IMG]

    Except for the UC brake valve and cylinder (PSC), the underbody detail is scratchbuilt. The Pintsch gas tanks are Evergreen styrene tubing and brass bar and wire, as are the various air reservoirs, except for the emergency reservoir at the lower right: it's from two halves of an airtank from an Athearn GP-7, cut apart and cemented together, back-to-back.
    [​IMG]

    GVC combine Willowpoint (MDC/Roundhouse Pullman Palace car)
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    The kit's truss rod underbody has been updated with the addition of a steel fishbelly underframe, built up from sheet and strip styrene. Other than the UC valve and cylinder, all underbody detail is scratchbuilt. The battery boxes are square styrene tubing, with sheet styrene "doors" and styrene rod "hinges". The water tank at lower left is sheet styrene, rolled around a piece of round styrene tubing. The steam traps are finishing nails, and all brake rods are brass or stainless steel wire. The generator drive belt is fabricated from brass shimstock.
    [​IMG]

    Wayne