Has anyone attempted...

Discussion in 'Scratchin' & Bashin'' started by CharlesH., Nov 2, 2004.

  1. CharlesH.

    CharlesH. Member

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    ... to scratchbuild vehicles?
    As I've stated before I model 1941, but the variety of availabe vehicles for that period is limited to plenty of fords, a pair of chevrolets and a Cord roadster and I'd like to have a few buicks, some DeSotos and a couple of Packards on the layout too. Any ideas?

    On a similar note, has anyone tried to make figures? I have an article by John Allen on the subject, but it seems a tad to difficult (he made them using wax).
  2. philip

    philip Guest

    a old vehicle

    Charles, I have only built train cars. Interesting idea! How about this one? I have no idea what it is. It belonged to my uncle.

    Mr. Allen made those figures from bees wax?

    philip :)

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  3. CharlesH.

    CharlesH. Member

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    Wow, that looks like a midget model A! I'll have to ask a fellow classic car expert.
  4. CharlesH.

    CharlesH. Member

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    <triple post>
  5. CharlesH.

    CharlesH. Member

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    <triple post>
  6. CharlesH.

    CharlesH. Member

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    <triple post>
  7. ddavidv

    ddavidv Member

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    Awww, c'mon guys, challenge me. :sleeping:
    It's an American Austin or Bantam. Made here in the USA under license from Austin of England. In fact, they were manufactured here in my home state (Butler, PA). More facts here.
    The Bantam was used as a platform for the first Jeep! Bantam received an order for prototypes of a 4wd vehicle as a result, shown below:
    [​IMG]
    Unfortunately, due to the small production facility in PA, the actual contract to build the Jeep was award to Willys an Ford, which built the more recognizable Jeep you have all seen. Bantam's 'reward' for inventing this icon was a contract to build Jeep trailers:
    [​IMG]
    And thus ends your automotive history lesson for today (sorry for taking this so far OT).
  8. ddavidv

    ddavidv Member

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  9. CharlesH.

    CharlesH. Member

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    HO scale... I forgot to mention that.
  10. philip

    philip Guest

    David, thanks for the information. I'll certainly pass this on to my family.
    I remember those M151a1 from the military. Those trailers were top heavy. Never quite understood why the M998 hummer was scooped up by uncle sam. The jeep was better.

    sorry for hi-jacking your thread Charles. Keeps us posted. What are you going to scratchbuild?

    philip :thumb:
  11. CharlesH.

    CharlesH. Member

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    Right now I'm thinking of:
    1938 LaSalle
    1937 Packard
    1940 Cadillac
    1939 Buick
    1936 Buick

    The only parts I have are tires and the hood of a mystery car that came with a Woodland Scenics "Possum Hollow" kit.
  12. ddavidv

    ddavidv Member

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    If you'd want to "kitbash" some cars, there's plenty of stuff available to work with. A lot of old-time plastic model kits from the 60s-70s were available in a scale compatible with HO. I'd also consider die cast assembled models, like Matchbox Yesteryears or any of the other numerous brands. Repainted and detailed, these can make for some really nice cars. Not all of them are the same scale, despite what the box may say, as many of them were sized to fit their respective packaging. There's a good selection and photos at EWA Model Cars.

    My first love/hobby is cars, so hopefully I can help you guys out a bit in this regard.
  13. Muddy Creek

    Muddy Creek Member

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    Long ago, I "scratchbuilt" a Model T in N scale out of a 3x5 card, Elmers Glue, and a fine tip marker. From a safe distance, it was as cute as a button. Don't know where it went off to over the years. I think perhaps the vaccuum ate it.

    Wayne
  14. 2slim

    2slim Member

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    CharlieH,
    Check out this link; Truck Stop Models
    Go to the catalog and select 'Autos & Buses' then look for the manufacturer 'Greg's Garage' they have the autos you're looking for. In fact this site has the best selection of HO Autos, Trucks and Buses available. They also have some great links to check out, they are mail order, but they have great service. Of course you'll want to check out all the manufacturers but Greg's, Sylvan and a few others will be your favorites.

    2slim :thumb:
  15. 2slim

    2slim Member

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    CharlesH,
    Forgot to mention that Greg's cars are cast clear resin with seperate wheels, (also resin) they need to be painted and the wheels glued on, nothing too tramatic!! They are pretty reasonably priced too.

    2slim
  16. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    I try to build off of what is readily available, scratchbuilding only when I have to. The three trucks to the left came from Model Power hearses and a fire truck, extensively modified with kibbles and bits from the scrap box. The blue truck is a cheap party favor with a scratchbuilt stake body. The road compacter is completely scratchbuilt from sheet styrene and scrap box details.

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  17. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    My LPBs come from...well, er...I just buy large lots of unpainted figures and think of them as merely a large collection of body parts to be removed and reassembled at my will and desire. Bambi on the left started our life as a Plasticville LPB minister, now with repositioned arms, an enhanced chest, navel and pants carved to look like boots. Her sister on the peir started out as a Plasticville brakeman, cut at the torso, reattached with limbs reshaped and features enhanced with a putty I make by disolving sprues into liquid styrene cement. This same putty could be used to help you get those curving lines of late 30s, early 40s cars. The figures in the center show how they share common features that were modified to suit. To the right you'll see how I got a figure by simply carving off details that don't fit the era I model.

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  18. CharlesH.

    CharlesH. Member

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    Funny, I thought Greg's Garage went out of business and all that was left were Williams Brothers and Jordan, but apparently I was wrong, thanks for the link slim! The 36 DeSoto is a beauty!
    [​IMG]
    It even has the hood ornament! I think I'll save up a bit more to buy these beauties... although the idea of making a cardboard model T seems intriguing.