Canadian National paint numbers

Discussion in 'HO Scale Model Trains' started by Glen Haasdyk, Dec 30, 2007.

  1. Glen Haasdyk

    Glen Haasdyk Active Member

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    I'm looking to pick up some new paint for my CN loco (diesel)
    Could anyone tell me the difference between CN Green #11 and CN Green#12
    I've bought # 11 before but found it a little dark. Floquil makes CN#12 and I'm wondering if its lighter of even used on the early CN diesels.
  2. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Maybe the CN SIG can help? cnlines.ca

    Andrew
  3. Glen Haasdyk

    Glen Haasdyk Active Member

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    Thanks I did and the # 11 went on diesel engines and passenger cars. The #12 went on Boxcar doors used in paper service. So I'll be sticking with the scalecoat paint.
  4. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Glen, I agree: even though the Scalecoat Green #11 was developed with the cooperation of the CN SIG, I think that it looks too dark, too. And that certainly isn't helped by the lower light levels most of us have over our layouts. I use SMP Accupaint AP-30 CN Green, and find it more to my taste. It can be hard to find, but they're still making it. I generally buy the store's entire stock of it when I do manage to locate some, as it seems to have a very good shelf-life. I thin it with lacquer thinner for airbrushing, but find that it's not very suitable for brush painting beyond minor touch-ups.
    I use it on CNR passenger cars and diesels, and also on the passenger cars of my free-lanced roads.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Wayne
  5. Renovo PPR

    Renovo PPR Just a Farmer

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    This is a lighter version.

    [​IMG]
  6. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    What brand is the colour on your good-looking geeps. Colour fidelity is so subjective, it's impossible to say this colour or that colour is "correct". My pictures don't even look the same colour as they do in person. ;):-D

    Wayne
  7. Renovo PPR

    Renovo PPR Just a Farmer

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    This is done by MTH and the color is a perfect match to the real thing, though each monitor can produce a slightly different hue.
  8. Glen Haasdyk

    Glen Haasdyk Active Member

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    I've painted a couple diesels in Model master Medium green but I think they lack the olive drab tone:
    [​IMG]

    But on the other hand the color can be different from one picture to another:

    [​IMG]

    I've almost given up on what is the correct color from the paint manufacturers. (You should see the Badger CP tuscan red) I figure there were probably a couple different shades of CN #11 green since they couldn't have bought all the paint they needed for 20 years back in the later 40's. Paint batches probably changed for order to order so some were darker and some were lighter.
  9. Squidbait

    Squidbait Recovering ALCO-holic

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    Doc,

    Can you tell me how you got those decals to sit so nicely on the top curves of your RS3's? I tried that years ago, and I just could not get my Accucals to sit smoothly on those compound curves, no matter how much Solvaset/Microset/Microsol I used... I must've tried 3 or 4 times before finally giving up!
  10. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Unless the decals I'm using are particularily fragile, I either let them sit in a glass of water until the backing paper drops away, or I let them sit, wet, on a sheet of glass until they slide easily off the paper. I then dip them several times in water to remove any excess glue. Before placing the decal on the model, I wet the area with Microset, then plop the decal in place. It can be manoeuvred into place with tweezers, and lifted as necessary to get rid of major air bubbles. When I get it where I want it, I blot it with a clean hankerchief, then apply more Microset. When that has evaporated, I apply Solvaset, which usually does the trick. If there are raised ridges remaining where the decal has folded over itself on the curved contours after the Solvaset has dried, I apply a small amount of Solvaset to the problem areas, wait a few seconds until the decal re-softens slightly, then blot firmly with the clean hanky. This usually flattens things out, but it may also leave an imprint of the weave of the fabric, which I touch-up with a small brush and some matching Accupaint after the decal has dried.
    I have to admit, though, that decalling has always been a hit-or-miss operation for me: they either go on great with almost no fuss, or I end-up with hundreds of tiny airbubbles trapped beneath the decal, and have to spend hours (literally) slitting them and applying more Solvaset. When it's a viable option, I much prefer dry transfers.

    Wayne