Best way to wire this layout

Discussion in 'FAQs' started by Connor, Jan 25, 2005.

  1. Connor

    Connor Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    In my last reply, switch = turnout. I'll be using the Atlas Snap-Switch Machines with Atlas turnouts. Only part electrical is why/how to isolate the turnout appropriately. It that colored diagram, I isolated the curved part of the turnout where it meets another turnout. leaving the straight part of the turnout as part of the main line.
  2. theBear

    theBear Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2004
    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    0
    OK .... when I say switch I mean an electrical type switch .... every single block you create will need a method of selecting and attaching a cab to it. This is normally done with a multiple position switch (electrical kind) and a loco pocket can be handled by using a simple switch (electrical kind) to attach it to the adjacent block (since you need only isolate that section to park the loco). Mulitiple position switches are usually priced by the number of poles and number of positions if you are running 3 cabs you would need 3 position 2 pole (making an assumption here) switches (electrical kind) for each block.

    You can replace these switches (electrical kind) with a simple plug and jack system (read cheaper).

    Likewise each of your switches (turnout kind) that is to be remotely controlled will need a switch machine (electrically operated to physically move the points of the turnout) and a single pole double throw momentary contact switch (electrical kind) to activate it. This can also be replaced by a cheaper wand and contact system.

    So we have switches (various kinds) all over the place [​IMG].
  3. Connor

    Connor Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yea, Electrical switches aren't a biggie.. I can figure that part out no problem.. Was more of a issue on where to hook up the blocks at on the track and where to properly isolate sections.. and the big question was how to properly wire the turnout into a block, and which block it went in, and if it needed to be isolated on all 3 sides, or just the curved turnout side.. anyways.. Do you have any suggestions on the blocks?
  4. theBear

    theBear Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2004
    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've always isolated the entire frog end that is all four rails (except in yard ladder types of situations) .... a new block starts there and ends there at the next frog end. This makes it easy to remember. I really like to keep it simple (which is why I'm now using DCC).
  5. Connor

    Connor Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Doesn't that add extra switches (electric) that's not really needed? In my cases, it breaks up those ovals into half sections..
  6. theBear

    theBear Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2004
    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    0
    Have you given any thought as to how you get a train into one of the ovals while also getting another out of the same oval?

    There can be operational reasons to split the ovals. The old do it and try it before casting it in concrete applys here.
  7. Connor

    Connor Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well, not really, If I break it up any more, I could probably use the money spent on electric switches for a DCC system.. Not to mention reduce the complexity of operation..
  8. theBear

    theBear Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2004
    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    0
    Plugs and Jacks ..... You can skip the multiple pole / position switches (electrical types) .... [​IMG][​IMG]
  9. Connor

    Connor Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    You have any photos of your setup using plugs & jacks?
  10. theBear

    theBear Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2004
    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    0
    That was back in the 80's. I'm just getting back into the hobby after a long absence. I don't have a single picture of that layout. In fact I probably don't have a picture of any layout built since the 60's and that was all O27 stuff. There were switches on those. I'm not a person who takes pictures.
  11. Connor

    Connor Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is a little outside of the scope on the subject.. But, I was wondering, on my layout, what pros/cons would there be to using flex track for the main loops? My wife is afer me to use existing trax that I had bought before I decided on a layout and I ended up with 10 pices of 36" code 100 Atlas flex track. The other question is code 100 vs code 83.. I do like code 83 as it looks a tad more realistic and the switch machines are smaller..
  12. CalFlash

    CalFlash Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    You can always use the code 100 stuff for hidden areas or save them for use if you do create some hidden staging or other trackage.
  13. Connor

    Connor Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    Don't really have a significant amount of hidden areas on the existing layout I'm looking at building. Anyways, so, what are the pros/cons with using the flex vs. sectional for the main loops?
  14. CalFlash

    CalFlash Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    Flex track will let you make curves to fit instead of using limited sizes. Also longer lengths means less joints to worry about. This is important when it comes to wiring if you plan on using DCC.
  15. Connor

    Connor Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am planning on using DCC at some point, my concern was getting the curves just right using flex.. Also, I can't find the specail ENDS for flex.. I've found them for code 83, but I can't find them for code 100..
  16. CalFlash

    CalFlash Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    DCC wiring reccommendations are that every piece of rail have a feeder and not rely on rail joiners for electrical purposes. There are curved gauges that are available in various radii. When I laid my flex track, I drew the curves with a tramel (yardstick with a nail on one end and pencil on the other). Then I pinned the track down using map pins and cut the ends. Putting the rail back down I traced the outside edges leaving me a nice pattern to glue the track I"m not sure what you mean by special ends unless you mean rail joiners If that is what you mean they are available
  17. Connor

    Connor Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm talking about atlas part # 0599 Ho Code-83 Concrete 3" End Snap

    Good greif!! Every peice of rail have a feeder??? Oh my..
  18. CalFlash

    CalFlash Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    Recommendations are that you drop a feeder to the bus every 6' or so. I split my feeders to a Y so both ends of the joint are fed. When using flex, it's a good idea to solder joints on the curves to hold alignment but leave small gaps elsewhere to allow for expansion.
  19. Connor

    Connor Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm not understanding the deal with the Y, you have any pictures?
  20. CalFlash

    CalFlash Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just branch off two wires from one. I usually use about a#14 or #16 tap off the bus then splice 2 #18 or 20 wires the last 8-10" - one going to each rail on either side of the rail joint.

    [​IMG]