back from the shop

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by cn nutbar, Dec 22, 2007.

  1. cn nutbar

    cn nutbar Member

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    hello everyone---whenever the CN sends it's locomotives on lease to the EG&E,they know the equipment is in good hands---as a matter of fact,all the locomotives return in better shape than before they left---the boys from the Lowbanks' shops are all craftsmen and the pride they take in servicing their locomotives is legendary.So it comes as no surprise that when CN 4100 needed a snowloader installed,they called the experts.Here's a few pictures of the 4100 fresh from the shops

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  2. rogerw

    rogerw Active Member

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    keep in mind there is no such thing as a stupid question just stupid people that ask questions but what are snowloaders?
  3. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    Hey Roger, don't feel lonely. What is a snowloader?

    Loren
  4. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Well, what was installed on the 4100 was the large pipe running from the engineer's side of the steam dome, along the upper side of the boiler, and terminating in a plug on the smokebox front. Both Mister Nutbar and I thought that this was for a snow "melter" - the original version of the jet-powered one that came later:
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    However, the term used in the CNR SIG Magazine called the device a Barber Green Snow Loader, although no explanation or photo of this device was offered. I googled "Barber Green Snow Loader", and it came back with a description of the device used to clear snow from city streets - it picks up the snow, then uses an integral conveyor to transfer it to waiting trucks. We are guessing that the railroad device was a steam-powered version that was pushed by the locomotive, gathering snow in yards or urban areas, and transferring it to gondolas, most likely between the loco and the loader. However, this is just a guess: we would welcome comments from anybody with more info on this machine and its operation. A photograph would be nice, too. ;)

    Wayne
  5. Sarge_7

    Sarge_7 Member

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  6. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Thanks for posting those photos, Sarge_7. That looks more-or-less how I had pictured it would. I'm still curious how it was used by the railroad, though. I wonder if they simply used it to place the snow where they wanted it, rather than using a wedge or rotary plow, which puts it all over the place. Or did they use the device to pick-up the snow from urban-area tracks, then melt it before disposing of it trackside?

    Wayne
  7. UP SD40-2

    UP SD40-2 Senior Member

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    Well nutbar, you know your #4100 is my favorite steamer that you have:winki: , and just when i thought it couldn't get any better, Wayne did his magic to it and made it even more AWESOME then it already was:thumb::mrgreen: .

    GREAT ENGINE nutbar:thumb: , and OUTSTANDING JOB Wayne:bravo: .

    :deano: -Deano
  8. cn nutbar

    cn nutbar Member

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    Thanks Deano---I am very lucky to have such a talented friend in Doctor Wayne who,as you well know,is the true talent as far as my collection goes---and thanks again to Sarge 7 who has solved the mystery of the snowloader---here's another shot of the 4100 rolling into Elfrida on the EG&E

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