Another " heat in garage " thread

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Nomad, Jul 17, 2008.

  1. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    Thanks Russ, that is what I was wondering. And, if you look at the pics I posted, there is a 2x8 running along the center of the walls that I will have to trim down to 2x4. Looks this will keep me busy for a while.
    Mountain Man, if I built this like my benchwork, it will never stay up!

    Loren
  2. N Gauger

    N Gauger 1:20.3 Train Addict

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    sign1sign1sign1 Yeah, Just build the benchwork and
    stand it in it's edge!! :eek::eek::eek:
  3. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    Why do you have to trim the 2x8? In the pics it looks like it is mounted flat against the wall. You should be able to just screw your 2x4 right to the 2x8 and use it to help support the stud wall.
  4. Relic

    Relic Member

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    Y' kind of wandered off from the heating part a bit,wha'?
    Condensation is a problem when you don't have constant heat,so I would try and keep a bit of heat all the time,to keep it dry and turn it up when your there.What that heat sourse would be depends on your budget more than anything,but wood would be on the bottom of the list for a lot of reasons
  5. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    Russ, if you look again, there is what looks like a shelf along the middle of the wall. It's a 2x8 on edge. It sticks out about an 2" when I hold a 2x4 against the wall.
    Relic, your right. We did wander, but I am glad it did. This has turned into a great thread for me. And yes, wood heat is no longer an option. I am now looking at "barn" heaters and the like for the winter months. Something to turn low and leave on constantly.

    Loren
  6. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    I just looked, I didn't notice the "shelf" until I saw what looks like an extension cord laying on it. Don't try to cut it down to match the 2x8s that are mounted against the wall. Put a 2x4 leg under each end for support, and cut it @ 3 1/2 inches out from the 2x8s. Then you set your blade depth on your circular saw to cut notches the depth of the 2x4 studs where ever the studs go. When you set up your stud wall into place, run screws into the studs from the cut down 2x8 at an angle and it will act as a stiffener for the studs as well as a fire break.
  7. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    Do you mean I should notch the 2x8 to fit the studs? I am having trouble visualizing what you mean.

    Loren
  8. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    It's official

    The boss has spoken!:cry: This is what I get for my train room.
    I will lose 4' in length but gain a foot in width, making the room 20x9'. Just about where I started.:confused:

    Loren

    Attached Files:

  9. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    The other 2x8's are mounted to the wall on edge. That means they stick out from the wall 1 1/2 inches. If you try to trim the 2x8 shelf down to the same thickness as the other 2x8's, you will end up with a 2x2. If you cut it length wise to leave a 2 x 4 sideways against the wall and try to mount studs against it , they will not be flush against the other lumber on the wall. What you want to do then is notch the now 2x4 board for each stud to allow the studs to be screwed flush to all of the lumber on the wall.
  10. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    An idea. Could I frame the walls with 2x6?

    Loren
  11. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    I hadn't thought of 2x6 studs, but it might be less work. In that case you would need to cut 5 1/2 inch x 1 1/2 inch notches on 16 inch centers in the 2 x 8 shelf. You could put some really thick fiberglass bats in for insulation as well.
  12. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    That 2"x8" is either a lateral stiffener for the wall, or it's a shelf. If it's a shelf, simply remove any of it that's in your way. If it's a stiffener, don't notch it at all, as its strength will be compromised (the same reason why you can't notch the bottom edge of a joist). If the latter is the case, simply build your 2"x4" stud wall inside the inside edge of the 2"x8". Tie the new wall to the 2"x8", and, if you're going to add insulation, block the space at the top and inside edge between the new wall and the existing exterior wall. Use a Hilti gun to fasten your bottom plate to the concrete floor.
    Alternatively, you could build a 2"x4" knee wall below that 2"x8", using it as the top plate, then build a short wall to set atop the now-supported 2"x8". Make the inside face of your 2"x4" wall flush with the inside edge of the 2"x8", and again, Hilti the bottom plate to the floor.

    Edit: After looking at your photos again, and re-reading what I've written, I'm convinced that those 2"x8"s are stiffeners (they seem to be on all of the walls), so I would neither notch nor remove them. I think that my second suggestion is your easiest and cheapest solution, too, and would give you an extra 3 1/2" of floorspace. ;):-D

    Wayne
  13. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    Sounds like a plan!
    Thanks for your help Russ. Maybe this thread will help other people.

    Loren
  14. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    Dr Wayne, good to hear from you! I have not seen you here for awhile.
    I believe that "shelf" is a stiffener.
    You are talking about building a wall on top of the "shelf" and a separate wall underneath the "shelf"? That is what I have planned on doing with the 2x6's. I would use joist brackets to fasten the studs to the 2x8's top and bottom. That will give me a flush surface to drywall. I just got back from HD to see what's available, which is what gave me the idea.
    Sorry I didn't mention that earlier Russ. The idea came to me when I read DR Wayne's reply. Do you guy's think that would be ok?

    Loren
  15. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Loren, the joist hangers are superfluous in this situation, as you'll still need to toe-nail the studs into the 2"x8". Your other choice is to build two short (height-wise) walls, with both top and bottom plates (although the bottom one could use the 2"x8" as its top plate), with the nails driven through before installing the top section. The lower section would fit under and support the 2"x8", while the upper one would merely sit atop the now-supported 2"x8".

    Wayne
  16. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    Using the joist hangers was my idea for regulating the depth of the nails or screws. I don't want to take a chance on going through the siding and causing water leaks from outside.

    Loren
  17. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    You've lost me there: the new lower wall section, without a top plate, would be built laying on the floor, then placed under the 2"x8". Fasten the bottom plate to the concrete floor with Hilti nails, and nail down, through the 2"x8" and into the top end of the short studs used for the lower wall.
    Construct the upper wall section, again, on the floor, using both a top and bottom plate. Lift it into position atop the 2"x8", then nail down again, through the bottom plate and into the 2"x8". You'd need to tie the top of the upper wall section to the main wall of the building, using blocks of wood and nails or screws of the proper length. Are you intending to cover over the window area at the top of the side wall? I purposely built my basement layout room with no windows, as I wanted to have complete control over the lighting, although that's a matter of personal preference. A fully insulated wall, instead of the window area, will make it easier to control the temperature in your layout area, though.
    Have you given any consideration to how you're going to handle the ceiling? That could have a bearing (literally) ;) on how you construct your walls.

    Wayne
  18. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    Ok Doctor Wayne, now I understand.
    If you look at the pics on page two, there is a 2x6 running above the windows. I was going to fasten the wall studs up to them for strength, but not build the room any higher than the truss. So yes, I would cover the windows with insulation.
    As far as the ceiling goes, I thought I could build it like the walls, and maybe fasten it to the truss for support? The ceiling would be flat.

    Loren
  19. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    I would plan any ceiling joists to be supported by the stud wall in back, on both sides, and the front. The trusses are designed specifically to support the roof and any snow load that might end up on the roof. I wouldn't try to use the trusses to support anything else. You are going to use stud walls to create a 9' x 20' room for the layout. Run your ceiling joices in the 9 foot direction, and you won't need to use outrageously heavy lumber to span a 20 foot distance.
  20. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    Great Russ, that is what I was hoping. Thanks.

    Loren