War!

gbwdude

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Jun 15, 2010
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Since I've joined the Army, I've been interested in the history of the Army Transportation Corps and what they used as far as equipment and conducted their missions. Ironically since I'm back in Korea I found a Korean War article that is pretty interesting:http://www.catskillarchive.com/rrextra/KOREA.Html

If anyone has pictures of war related railroad stuff, modern or vintage, this would be the place to put them.

Tyler
 

Bill Nelson

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Dec 15, 2008
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Clarksville Tn
Since I've joined the Army, I've been interested in the history of the Army Transportation Corps and what they used as far as equipment and conducted their missions. Ironically since I'm back in Korea I found a Korean War article that is pretty interesting:http://www.catskillarchive.com/rrextra/KOREA.Html

If anyone has pictures of war related railroad stuff, modern or vintage, this would be the place to put them.

Tyler
Tyler I have a very interesting book from my dad's library called Narrow Gauge to No Man's Land, documenting the little narrow gauge railways the army used to keep the trenches supplied in WW1. Some of the stuff found it's way into use after the war but most was sold overseas as they were built to european standards.


Fort Morgan, at the interance to Mobile bay had tracks for carts to move amumition in the Spanish American war era facilities. there was briefly a rail line for supply all the way to Foely Alabama, but it was wiped out in a hurricane, and was never replaced. Nelson
 

gbwdude

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Jun 15, 2010
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Camp Claiborne

Bill,

That sounds pretty cool. I know in WW2 the Brits used a narrow gauge rail line that ran along the coast and they built neat little anti aircraft guns on these amusement park sized trains. Here is the link to that railroad: http://www.narrow-gauge-pleasure.co.uk/railways/rlyromney.aspx


I've never heard of Fort Morgan (or Camp Morgan as was the almost-standard before the end of WW2) but I know about Camp Claiborne, LA. It was the home of the 725th Railway Operations Battalion and ran between Camp Claiborne and Camp Polk (now Fort Polk). They had a neat little roster of hand-me-down locomotives from the Texas and Pacific that were all oil burners. To my knowledge it's the only Army base that never used Army standard locomotives, but it's rolling stock was a combination of stuff that was used in Europe, standard American rolling stock and some homebuilt stuff. On top of regular maintenance and operations, the boys of the 725th trained on repairing blown up track and patching up those old kettles after they've been shot up. Training environment or not, I'd pack a few extra pairs of pants with when this happens (at around 1:05):[YOUTUBE]Z70eRGy5sTo[/YOUTUBE]

Tyler
 

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zathros

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This is really interesting. The little car looks really economical to run, especially on such a short haul!! :mrgreen:

In all seriousness, the bigger car looks like it is armored and made to deflect bomb blasts from the bottom.
 

gbwdude

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Jun 15, 2010
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The more and more I look at it, I almost want one. Kinda like my wacky love affair with owning a deuce and a half from the Vietnam era. There's no real need for it (except if I needed to move or we somehow got flooded) but I really want one. Except mine would be family friendly... see the bottom pic.

 

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