The "Original" Kittom Lumber Company. Part #2

Doctor G

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Sep 2, 2008
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Henry and Joe were assigned today to operate Mr Kilgore's Log Loading Machine......and move some sticks.

At least Henry is working.

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Meanwhile "Smoky Joe" has snuck off behind the loader to enjoy another of Kentucky's favorite
past times lighting up one from his pack of fine hand rolled Tobacco Cigarettes.

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Thanks for looking. Doc Tom
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zathros

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That log loader is awesome!! ;)
 

Doctor G

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Sep 2, 2008
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The "Gin Pole" is probably the simplest way to pick up logs and put them on or off log cars. The early days of steam logging used these exstensively.

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A review of the literature on the net revealed this nice diagram of the top end of the gin pole.

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So, I thought I would give it a go and make two gin poles one for the logging landing and the other for the log dump on the mini layout.

First is the top end with a length of blackened brass chain securing one of Mr Wiseman's nice castings of O scale block and tackle.

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I roughed up and stained a dowel to stand in for the pole itself.

Next up was using wire and swivels to secure guylines to stumps on the layout.

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Guy lines were secured to the top of the pole much like in the diagram.

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So far the gin pole has not fallen down.
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Next to come is rigging the steam donkey and some weathering.

Let me know what you think?

Doc Tom
 

gbwdude

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Doc,

Good to see you're back to logging. Your former Caseyville & Scouttown Mogul may be wearing new clothes but she's still earning her keep on the Whiskey River Ry. Now #44 she sits on the workbench finally getting that sound decoder she's been asking for. She will also be getting a spoked pilot wheelset up front and the family standard high mounted headlight.
 

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Doctor G

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Sep 2, 2008
1,416
297
78
Clarksville, Tennessee
Doc,

Good to see you're back to logging. Your former Caseyville & Scouttown Mogul may be wearing new clothes but she's still earning her keep on the Whiskey River Ry. Now #44 she sits on the workbench finally getting that sound decoder she's been asking for. She will also be getting a spoked pilot wheelset up front and the family standard high mounted headlight.

Really nice to hear from you and see that old steamer still running! Thanks Doc Tom
 
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zathros

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I built my barn, 75% on my own, hauling 5/8 4'x 8' plywood 26 feet on in the air using block and tackle, it was quite effortless. Lots of rope though! :)
 

Doctor G

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I built my barn, 75% on my own, hauling 5/8 4'x 8' plywood 26 feet on in the air using block and tackle, it was quite effortless. Lots of rope though! :)
While researching "gin poles" I noticed quite a few people using them in contemporary times. Amazing what these things can lift! Doc Tom
 

zathros

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They are labor saving devices, and will prevent you from hurting your back trying to haul too much. I have some pulleys taken off a 100 year old sailboat. Wood sides, with Bronze wheels, with Bronze bushings sleeved into the wood, which has flat metal straps around them very strategically mounted, they are extremely capable, and I have been offered quite a bit for them. They will go to Mystic Seaport in Ct. ;)
 

Doctor G

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Sep 2, 2008
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Clarksville, Tennessee
They are labor saving devices, and will prevent you from hurting your back trying to haul too much. I have some pulleys taken off a 100 year old sailboat. Wood sides, with Bronze wheels, with Bronze bushings sleeved into the wood, which has flat metal straps around them very strategically mounted, they are extremely capable, and I have been offered quite a bit for them. They will go to Mystic Seaport in Ct. ;)
Neat. Sounds like they will be well received @ Mystic Seaport. Tom
 
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zathros

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I helped a shipwright working on the "Charles W. Morgan", a whaling ship, at Mystic Connecticut some decades ago. I am a master machinists and toolmaker, and I have also been a mold maker. In any event, this fantastic shipwright was hand building a clinker built boat for the "Morgan", and I noticed, from behind the roped off line, that he was doing something that I thought I could make easier for him. I yelled out from behind the rope, I think I know a quicker way to do that", I was quite a bit younger than I am, but old enough, and he said"Come over here'. I explained that when he hammered the nails back, and was bending the part back through to curve the point back into the wood, he could put a radius in the backing iron he was holding to allow the nail to follow a path easier, and the twist of his wrist would have greater effect. He handed me his tool, and I asked if he had a dye grinder, and with a very fine wheel, made a small radius into the center of this very thick, and old piece of steel. He tried it, and did it quick, he then showed me how to do it. He told me he "couldn't believe he never thought of that". My then girlfriend hand been looking for me for 2 hrs., and commented, "how come is it that every time we go to these kind of places (i.e. airshows0 you end up where no one else can go". This guy showed me how to fair a hull with a very long fine strip of wood against formers, all kinds of techniques for lofting hulls, an exponential amount of information, he was a sage. I imagine he must have passed on by know, but he left a lasting impression in my life. When I started to teach myself Computer Aided Design, I was able to transfer the knowledge he shared with me into the digital realm, as the program I use, "Rhino 5.0", uses Control Points, which mimic very much how a long stick can work. Hull lofting become easy for me. So I will give them the Bronze rail pieces for a Fo'c'sle and Bronze cleats, and all of these very old pieces to Mystic, as they may have future use for them. :)
 
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Doctor G

Well-Known Member
Sep 2, 2008
1,416
297
78
Clarksville, Tennessee
I helped a shipwright working on the "Charles W. Morgan", a whaling ship, at Mystic Connecticut some decades ago. I am a master machinists and toolmaker, and I have also been a mold maker. In any event, this fantastic shipwright was hand building a clinker built boat for the "Morgan", and I noticed, from behind the roped off line, that he was doing something that I thought I could make easier for him. I yelled out from behind the rope, I think I know a quicker way to do that", I was quite a bit younger than I am, but old enough, and he said"Come over here'. I explained that when he hammered the nails back, and was bending the part back through to curve the point back into the wood, he could put a radius in the backing iron he was holding to allow the nail to follow a path easier, and the twist of his wrist would have greater effect. He handed me his tool, and I asked if he had a dye grinder, and with a very fine wheel, made a small radius into the center of this very thick, and old piece of steel. He tried it, and did it quick, he then showed me how to do it. He told me he "couldn't believe he never thought of that". My then girlfriend hand been looking for me for 2 hrs., and commented, "how come is it that every time we go to these kind of places (i.e. airshows0 you end up where no one else can go". This guy showed me how to fair a hull with a very long fine strip of wood against formers, all kinds of techniques for lofting hulls, an exponential amount of information, he was a sage. I imagine he must have passed on by know, but he left a lasting impression in my life. When I started to teach myself Computer Aided Design, I was able to transfer the knowledge he shared with me into the digital realm, as the program I use, "Rhino 5.0", uses Control Points, which mimic very much how a long stick can work. Hull lofting become easy for me. So I will give them the Bronze rail pieces for a Fo'c'sle and Bronze cleats, and all of these very old pieces to Mystic, as they may have future use for them. :)

That is really nice you remembered your mentor. Doc Tom