Dinoreplicas doodles

zathros

-----SENIOR ADMINISTRATOR----
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Apr 6, 2013
12,152
7,460
228
You don't still use Mac computers do you, their day has come and gone, unless your working with super professional custom built stuff, otherwise, P.C.s just do so much more, and while spending less money doing it. So many programs these days aren't even compatable with Macs. Just wondering. ;)
 
You don't still use Mac computers do you, their day has come and gone, unless your working with super professional custom built stuff, otherwise, P.C.s just do so much more, and while spending less money doing it. So many programs these days aren't even compatable with Macs. Just wondering. ;)
I don't think the Mac's day has gone especially in the graphic and print industry, much of which still considers Macs as compulsory. When I worked in GD studios it simply wasn't an option, you worked on a Mac and that was that.

Really though I'm not a fan of proprietary systems including MS Windows. My issue with Apple (and MS to a degree) is more about the business model. I don't like walled gardens, vendor lock-in or being manipulated for the purpose of making me a more lucrative customer.

I have a product photographer friend who is Mac-centric, doesn't like non Apple PCs and will probably get one of the new M1 (ARM based) Macs at the first opportunity. Many designer/creator types just want a system that keeps things simple and allows them to work, they don't want to explore further. I've nothing against this, it's just not for me.

All 3 of my computers are running Linux and my 2D/3D workflow is based on Krita and Blender. I still keep a Windows system with Adobe CS (on a VM) only for occasional design stuff but mostly I'm happy in my Linux bubble.
 
  • Like
Reactions: zathros
Just remembered I left the Dolphin model on Blendswap along with a Sub-D horse and an early attempt at a Styracosaurus. Anyone can download and mess with them if they fancy, the Styrac is possibly not that useful as I fixed it in an asymmetrical pose (for some reason), it could be used for detail sculpting practice.

The Dolphin is rigged and textured, it's not a great rig but it works for simple posing. The horse is un-textured and un-rigged but has a UV map so it's ready for some colour.

Dolphin model on Blendswap
Horse model on Blendswap
Styracosaurus model on Blendswap









A few people chose the dolphin model for their projects which is nice. This Maya technical director used it to demo their rigging skills and this 3D artist used it in a pretty nice fluid simulation.
 

zathros

-----SENIOR ADMINISTRATOR----
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Apr 6, 2013
12,152
7,460
228
If you can do what you do with Linux, then you are operating at a much higher level than not only myself, but many others. Since I mostly use Rhino3D, as I do a lot of designs that turn into parts for cars, motorcyles and other types of vehicles, I don't much have need for "Virtual" models. No one, as far as I know can make Rhino3D work on a Linux based system, McNeel is afraid of losing control of a program that they don't really charge much for, all things considered. Lots of programs are moving to a pay by the month as you use it system, which I think stinks. Apple moving to an Arm Based system, well, I have to see how that will work off. I have seen people struggle trying to make paper models so much using Apple products, they eventually go to Windows, as more is compatible. Your make my argument about Mac systems in the professional setting. They make nothing for the general public that would justify paying their exorbitant prices shackled to their limited compatibility. At least if you go with with P.C., their is just the need to have the same file format, and you can import and export, i.e. from Rhino to Blender, to AutoCad etc.. Your work is most impressive. Your mastery of Linux is great too. You're in the 1% group, that's for sure. We have a few other members in that group (not me, I programmed robotics, but that was something completely proprietary), Allen Tam (Goodduck) is one of those whose work is stellar, there are others too. Very impressive organic renderings. Not easy to pull off. IMHO ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Strick67
...as I do a lot of designs that turn into parts for cars, motorcyles and other types of vehicles
Intriguing.
No one, as far as I know can make Rhino3D work on a Linux based system, McNeel is afraid of losing control of a program that they don't really charge much for, all things considered.
Audodesk and SideFX successfully sell their 3D DCC big hitters on Linux so paid software can be successful on the platform. Linux's small market share is probably the main stumbling block for smaller developers. It's a shame because Rhino3D wold rock on Linux but I can appreciate why it wouldn't be worth the development effort.
Lots of programs are moving to a pay by the month as you use it system, which I think stinks.
Yeah the rental model is a drag, using free software keeps me out of it.
Apple moving to an Arm Based system, well, I have to see how that will work off.
I think performance oriented ARM chips have potential and users could benefit from competition for the X86 architecture, I just hope someone (not apple) will produce similar hardware for more open ended use, I'm dreaming of course.
I have seen people struggle trying to make paper models so much using Apple products, they eventually go to Windows, as more is compatible.
I've heard Pepakura is Win only, Windows ubiquity definitely has its advantages. I'm not up to speed on papercraft software as I managed to unwrap my Dimorphodon with Blender, any other programs out there?
Your work is most impressive. Your mastery of Linux is great too. You're in the 1% group, that's for sure.
The combo of being introverted plus self critical means it's hard for me to take compliments but thank you. I don't consider myself a master of Linux, I use user-friendly distros like Ubuntu and Linux Mint and with great software it's now surprisingly easy to use Linux as a creative platform. I'd like to be one of those Linux techno wizards but age is laying waste to my attention span :D.
Allen Tam (Goodduck) is one of those whose work is stellar...
Also intriguing, I'll check out his work.
 
Been toying with the idea of making more 3D dinos so I've finally made a start. I fancy recreating the Ceratosaurus/Stegosaurus face off that I did for the mural or at least a version of it.

The Cerato is one of my all time favourites, a more primitive theropod than the Allosaurus it lived alongside, it has a slightly awkward shape that's irresistible from a drawing/sculpting perspective. The 3 horns are spectacular and iconic. Drawn this on A4 copier paper at 1:20th scale, the skull is 1:10th scale. It represents the holotype specimen, USNM 4735. There's a few references around to help with proportions including the original reconstructions by Charles Gilmore, his 1920 paper is available online.



For scale drawing I have a scale rulers PDF I made a few years ago with 9 scales between 1:8 and 1:48, it wasn't necessary for the Cerato drawing as 1:10/1:20 is easy to measure but it comes in handy on occasion. When printing I have to make sure the output is set to 100%, those 'Shrink to fit page' settings can be troublesome. It's A4 paper size but I could probably do a US letter sized one if anyone wanted one.

Scale rulers PDF download on Deviantart
 

zathros

-----SENIOR ADMINISTRATOR----
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Apr 6, 2013
12,152
7,460
228
Your ability to produce such organic looking drawing/renders is most impressive. I've too much time invested into Rhino3D to do any other software, and my life is overflowing at the moment. That's one of best things about this forum, the people who reach a result in the same interests, using diverse platforms, and their sharing of methodology. )
 
The monitor died on my desktop PC so I've been mostly off-grid for the past few weeks. Rather than replace it I got myself a pen display from XP-Pen.

It's only 15.6". At some point I'll need a new full size screen but my puny 13yr old PC is a bit laggy supporting 2 displays (it's been tried).



I made a little frame to hold the screen upright for general use but allows it to be un-clipped and placed flat when I want to draw with it. It's a bit of a rough prototype but I'll probably refine it at some point.







So lately I haven't done much creatively but I'm sort of up and running again and keen to see how the pen display compares with my Surface-Pro.

As it happen I'm putting the dinosaurs away for a while. Grandson No. 2 now has his own bedroom and he's asking for a Paw Patrol mural so that's what I'll be working on next. I've measured the space and I'm gearing up for design and layout.