1960 Plymouth Valiant build thread.

Gandolf50

Researcher of obscure between war vehicles...
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Jan 28, 2013
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ah! I remember mine...and the day I trashed the trans...revving up and punching a button on the button shifter really a bad Idea!!
1960-plymouth-pc.jpg
 

Mark Crowel

User of old school drafting tools; no CAD.
Jul 28, 2007
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Southwest Michigan.
Took more photos, but can't upload them. A notice appears saying the mfc100u.dll can't be found. Followed the tutorials for reinstalling it, such as the command prompt scan and fix; and the Safe Start process, but nothing works.
 

Mark Crowel

User of old school drafting tools; no CAD.
Jul 28, 2007
234
172
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70
Southwest Michigan.
I was able to upload the photos directly from the camera into the computer after all, just had to figure out what item to click. You know the way it is, old dogs, new tricks.
The bumpers and splash pan are attached. The wheel discs and strips are shown. Axle holes were made with a 1/8 inch paper punch.

P1010043.JPGP1010044.JPGP1010045.JPGP1010046.JPGP1010047.JPGP1010048.JPG
 
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zathros

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Liquid Electric Tape makes for a good rubber effect for the wheels. If you glue strips of paper to the wheels, they will look like rubber treads. :)

It's like $7.99 a bottle, and it works great for the steering whel, dashboard buttons, but wheels especially:

LET.jpeg
 

Mark Crowel

User of old school drafting tools; no CAD.
Jul 28, 2007
234
172
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Southwest Michigan.
Hello THE DC,

I haven't forgotten about the white copies of the plans. Have to map out the strip parts. (Been busy with some other stuff lately.)
Thanks for your patience.
 

THE DC

Highly Esteemed Member
No worries! I'm pretty excited about the process.


When my father was growing up, he always built a plastic model kit of every car that he owned. Unfortunately, many of the vehicles I have are too odd to encourage mass produced kits (like the Lancer!).

It will be great to be able to build old Brandy!


Zathros: great idea regarding the tires! A keeper!
 

Mark Crowel

User of old school drafting tools; no CAD.
Jul 28, 2007
234
172
58
70
Southwest Michigan.
Zathros, forgive me for not applying your idea to the tires, but I was too eager to finish the model. The tires were built with the strip-and-panel construction method applied to the cardboard discs and strips shown earlier. Black paper strips formed the treads with tread strips drawn in ink. Colored paper discs decorate the wheels.
The axles are Q-Tips with the cotton removed.P1010001.JPGP1010002.JPGP1010003.JPGP1010004.JPGP1010005.JPGP1010006.JPG
 

Revell-Fan

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If you still have the plans and parts I'd say it IS a kit - made by you. ;) And It looks gorgeous! :Bravo:

Like Zathros said, it is not "just" a model, it crosses the border to art. Admittedly, every designer is an artist and we have many artists here, but your way of construction is pretty unique. I haven't seen it before.

At first I thought the car was larger than it really is. Your designing procedure can be used as a template to make a much larger version, maybe out of plywood, as a display piece for the garden, for example. And with a few small changes you could add opening doors and an interior with a turning steering wheel for the kids. I can imagine that would be quite a hit. :)
 
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Mark Crowel

User of old school drafting tools; no CAD.
Jul 28, 2007
234
172
58
70
Southwest Michigan.
Thank you, Revell-Fan, that's high praise! The model is about eight and a half inches long, and about three and a half inches wide.