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  1. Mark Crowel

    1960 Alvis TD21

    The work on the rework of this model is progressing decently. It will be built according to my typical method. There will be construction photos, but they will be posted along with the photos of the completed model, so that they will make more sense when you see how the components compose the...
  2. Mark Crowel

    1960 Alvis TD21

    I've spent the last few hours looking at the reference photos and comparing them to my model. In profile, the length of each section in relation to every other section looks correct. The problem is the oversimplification of my design and construction methods, and the resulting abruptness and...
  3. Mark Crowel

    1960 Alvis TD21

    My model's luggage area might be a bit too long, and the valleys between the luggage area and the rear quarters are much more subtle on the real care than on my model. This is the area I need to improve the most.
  4. Mark Crowel

    1960 Alvis TD21

    Looking on the internet, I saw some photos of 1960 Alvis TD1s with disc wheels and hub caps, so I used those on the model, simply because I prefer them to wire wheels. I would not want wire wheels on any real car that I would have. Here is another of the reference photos I used. My model's...
  5. Mark Crowel

    1960 Alvis TD21

    Here are the reference photos I was using. I see that my model needs larger wheel arches and wheels.
  6. Mark Crowel

    1960 Alvis TD21

    Yes, I'll be experimenting with a different method.
  7. Mark Crowel

    1960 Alvis TD21

    Back to the drawing board.
  8. Mark Crowel

    1960 Alvis TD21

    Thank you.
  9. Mark Crowel

    1960 Alvis TD21

    Thank you, however, I unintentionally double posted my photos, and I haven't figured a way to edit out the duplicates.
  10. Mark Crowel

    1960 Alvis TD21

    Here is a British car, a 1960 Alvis TD21 two door hardtop, with right hand drive. 10.5 inches long.
  11. Mark Crowel

    Studebaker Fire Truck.

    Thank you, all, for the kind compliments. Here are the final details. The real truck was built for the Neshanic, New Jersey Volunteer Fire Company. It now resides in the U.K.
  12. Mark Crowel

    Studebaker Fire Truck.

    Thank you.
  13. Mark Crowel

    Studebaker Fire Truck.

    Except for a couple of minor details, it's finished. I don't have the skill or the software to tackle the lettering. This is the most difficult homemade cardboard model I have ever built.
  14. Mark Crowel

    Studebaker Fire Truck.

    Thank you.
  15. Mark Crowel

    Studebaker Fire Truck.

    Roof lights and mirrors.
  16. Mark Crowel

    Studebaker Fire Truck.

    Thank you, gentlemen.
  17. Mark Crowel

    Studebaker Fire Truck.

    Pump, hoses, and other accessories on the front bumper. TEDIOUS!
  18. Mark Crowel

    Studebaker Fire Truck.

    It has a face, now. Still figuring the best way to make the pump.
  19. Mark Crowel

    Studebaker Fire Truck.

    Okay, thank you.
  20. Mark Crowel

    Studebaker Fire Truck.

    Thank you, but what is greebling?