Yards

Discussion in 'Tips, Tutorials & Tools' started by bholderman, Aug 11, 2005.

  1. bholderman

    bholderman Member

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    Greetings,

    Does anyone have a ny tips to creating an accurate yard on a naval vessel. What I'm looking for would be a horizonal round beam thicker at the middle tapering towards the ends, something like a toothpick, although I dont think a toothpick is at the scale I need.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Cheers,
    Brad
  2. bholderman

    bholderman Member

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    Greetings,

    Does anyone have a ny tips to creating an accurate yard on a naval vessel. What I'm looking for would be a horizonal round beam thicker at the middle tapering towards the ends, something like a toothpick, although I dont think a toothpick is at the scale I need.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Cheers,
    Brad
  3. Lepercan

    Lepercan Member

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    Try using two pieces of dried grass stem glued together.
    The local vacant lot will furnish a lot.
    Cut pieces with about the same diameter and taper, glue them together at their bases, and cover the jount with the ropes they used to hold the yard on the mast.

    Tom
  4. Lepercan

    Lepercan Member

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    Try using two pieces of dried grass stem glued together.
    The local vacant lot will furnish a lot.
    Cut pieces with about the same diameter and taper, glue them together at their bases, and cover the jount with the ropes they used to hold the yard on the mast.

    Tom
  5. swiftsword

    swiftsword Member

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    I've had good success with this method: take a wooden dowel of the size and length you need and fit it into the chuck of your power drill. Hold a piece of sandpaper between thumb and index finger and move it up and down the dowel while it's spinning (caution: it might get hot from the friction). By varying the pressure you'll be able to achieve the size and shape you want.

    Make sure you stop short of the perfect shape though, cause the dowel will invariably snap on the last finishing touch.


    Cheers,


    Oliver
  6. swiftsword

    swiftsword Member

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    I've had good success with this method: take a wooden dowel of the size and length you need and fit it into the chuck of your power drill. Hold a piece of sandpaper between thumb and index finger and move it up and down the dowel while it's spinning (caution: it might get hot from the friction). By varying the pressure you'll be able to achieve the size and shape you want.

    Make sure you stop short of the perfect shape though, cause the dowel will invariably snap on the last finishing touch.


    Cheers,


    Oliver
  7. GEEDUBBYA

    GEEDUBBYA Active Member

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    Howdy Bholderman,

    OK, follow this if you can. determine the "length" of the part you need.
    Now, cut out a square piece of paper that measures that length DIAGONALLY (from one corner to the other). Then fold the square in half along the diagonal line so as that you end up with a 2ply triangle.Now, begin rolling the paper tightly from the FOLD towards the point of the triangle. This will give you a "stick" with thin ends and a thicker middle, much like a large toothpick.you have several ways of glueing this, you can apply glue and roll it up with glue on the inside of the roll or, you can "laminate" it with glue or wax or whatever bonding agent after you roll it. BUT, you must roll it tight to achieve good strength.
    I hope this made sense to you. Now if you need a larger "diameter", you can roll the paper more loosely, but this will decrease the strength of the finished part unless you laminate it with glue or wax or laquer or something else.

    I hope this helps,

    Greg aka GW
  8. GEEDUBBYA

    GEEDUBBYA Active Member

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    Howdy Bholderman,

    OK, follow this if you can. determine the "length" of the part you need.
    Now, cut out a square piece of paper that measures that length DIAGONALLY (from one corner to the other). Then fold the square in half along the diagonal line so as that you end up with a 2ply triangle.Now, begin rolling the paper tightly from the FOLD towards the point of the triangle. This will give you a "stick" with thin ends and a thicker middle, much like a large toothpick.you have several ways of glueing this, you can apply glue and roll it up with glue on the inside of the roll or, you can "laminate" it with glue or wax or whatever bonding agent after you roll it. BUT, you must roll it tight to achieve good strength.
    I hope this made sense to you. Now if you need a larger "diameter", you can roll the paper more loosely, but this will decrease the strength of the finished part unless you laminate it with glue or wax or laquer or something else.

    I hope this helps,

    Greg aka GW
  9. bholderman

    bholderman Member

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    Guys,

    3 great ideas, thanks.

    Brad
  10. bholderman

    bholderman Member

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    Guys,

    3 great ideas, thanks.

    Brad
  11. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

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    Hi, Brad!

    Have you seen Larry Maxwell's method used on his HMS Cleopatra (take a look at his December 22nd post)?
    http://cardmodels.net/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=191&start=120

    I can tell you, having seen the actual spars and this fantastic model first hand, it's a pretty convincing and a good construction method.

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers!

    Jim
  12. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

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    Hi, Brad!

    Have you seen Larry Maxwell's method used on his HMS Cleopatra (take a look at his December 22nd post)?
    http://cardmodels.net/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=191&start=120

    I can tell you, having seen the actual spars and this fantastic model first hand, it's a pretty convincing and a good construction method.

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers!

    Jim
  13. bholderman

    bholderman Member

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    Jim,

    All I can say about that is wow.

    Brad
  14. bholderman

    bholderman Member

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    Jim,

    All I can say about that is wow.

    Brad