Wright Cyclone R-1820-97 Radial Engine

Discussion in 'Aircraft & Aviation' started by Gil, Sep 8, 2004.

  1. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Leif,

    Wonder where you've been..., needless to say a beautiful build! The gear case on the Cyclones were a truncated cone not a hemisphere which got sort of confused in the R-1820-97 build. The hemisphere was actually a side development for the Pratt & Whitney R-2800 needed for the C-47B project. It appears that you did a little damp forming for the top covers of the cylinder. The valve pans look great but get hidden on most every model with a closed cowl. An open cowl has the problem of the missing induction and exhaust so I guess this has to end up in the "Oh Well" bin for now. The thingy at the front bottom of the engine is the oil sump and the thingy on the top right, angled between the top and next cylinder is the constant speed propeller regulator. I've made provision for either - or on the 1:33 design. I'm now turning out rocker boxes after designing a jig to ease the assembly process (remove the fiddly-fidget factor mostly). The cylinders are all done and they look good mounted on the spider assembly. Should have something to show in several days.

    Again, at great build! Gil
  2. bfam4t6

    bfam4t6 Member

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    I can't wait to see what you've come up with Gil. I'm sure it will be amazing as always. And thank you Leif for showing us the build of the Halinski engine. It looks great even after your pointing out of the lack of detail. I know Gil has already carried it to the next stage so I am on the edge of my seat.
  3. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    Re: Cyklonski

    Thanks Gil. The top part of the cylinders actually went together surprisingly well. I started that part of the assembly with the valve rocker casings and forced the center part down last (which may have been the wrong way to go about it, the instructions say absolutely nothing on the assembly of the engine).

    The center top part is made up of two halves, which is how the saddle shape is achieved. Bottom corners certainly had to be prebent ("tucked in") where they join the valve rocker casings in order to attain a snug fit with the main cylinder, and the whole composite part was "massaged" while glued in place, which is one form of wet-shaping, of course. Preshaping is paramount here, as in most cases.

    The joints where touched up with white glue mixed with grey acrylic. Liberal doses of this mixture were applied also to the points where the push-rods join the rocker arm casings, and to the top of the casings. The entire engine of course has received one or several coats of matt acrylic varnish, which is a very effective way of removing unseemly shine from the metal pushrods, and from areas and spots covered with glue mixture. Makes all the difference, I'd say!

    Now, I have a question: Below you'll see an image of the real "Ruski Cyklonski", and as you can see it is mounted at a different angle, with the oil sump pointing upwards and to the right (viewed from the front). First I thought this was a mistake by the museum (stupid me!), but after having pondered the Polikarpov design it turns out this might well be necessary, since there is an air intake at the bottom of the front cowl which has to pass through the cylinders at the point where the oil sump normally would block it.

    So, what do you think - is the "Ruski" way of mounting the engine possible from a mechanical point of view (would entail a need for an internal oil tube going on down to the bottom, I presume). Need to know this (or at least get an informed view) in order to determine how to proceed.

    Also, do you - or somebody in the know - have an idea on whether the Polikarpov I-16 had propeller governor (adjustable rpm or constant speed prop)? In that case, I should add that little thingy as well. But it is not visible on the engine below (which on the other hand might not be for the Polikarpov at all, of course).

    And, again, perhaps the prop governor and the oil sump are actually combined into one unit - would that be possible?

    Leif
  4. gera

    gera Member

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    Hi Leif:
    Beautiful engine, best I have seen.....the quality of the work you put into it is incredible......really nice :shock: :shock: :shock:
  5. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Leif,

    The structure on top between the vertical and the next cylinder apears to be a constant speed prop governor. The oil scavenge sump is at the bottom. This is similar to the the SBD Dauntless which used the Wright Cyclone version which also had the prop governor offset in the same manner. Blocking the air induction will require futher research.

    I looked around to see if there was any information on the I-16 and whether it used a constant speed prop but couldn't find any in English but I believe that it did as it achieved fairly good flight speeds.

    I'm slogging through the rocker pans right now. Should be finished tomorrow if schedule affords time.

    Best Regards, Gil
  6. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Dry fit test of all major components of the revised design. Rocker pans, push rods, prop governor (and mount) and oil sump are finished waiting for final integration. Ignition design is next.

    Gil

    P.S. Just noticed that one of the cylinders is not from this design lot. Easy to mix them up if you're not careful.

    [​IMG]
  7. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Update

    The rocker pans were added. A custom paint mixture prepared from white glue, flat & metallic paints was applied onto the assemblies and then "washed-wiped off" with a damp flat brush. Some of the cylinders aren't aligned due to the assmebly being only dry fit for a picture so please forgive what looks like odd angles (plus camera lens distortions). All assemblies shown will be glued together next. Pushrod wire stock has been prepared from 24 AWG florist wire (A primer coat and a two coats of acrylic gloss black). The propeller governor and oil sump will then be glued to the gear case completing the mechanical assembly. Ignition distribution design is based on an "O" ring and bare copper wire. It shouldn't be too much of a challenge (famous last words?).

    Gil

    [​IMG]
  8. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    Looking very, very good! Nice touch with the floral wire and gloss black paint. Aren't floral wires nice stuff, comes in different dimensions, too! O-ring for ignition - ingenious! I'm thinking about coarse copper wire, in order to replicate the divided harness, and the lead ins to the back of the engine. But O-rings will be just the thing for 1/33 I imagine.

    Leif
  9. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Leif,

    Floral wire is nice! The selection of 24 AWG approximates the diameter of the pushrod tubes. I buy it in spools as it's lower in cost. To straighten it clamp one end in a vice or wind it around a door knob, clamp the other end in a pair of pliers and rap the pliers with a hammer several times. This stretches the wire a little and straightens it nicely. If the wire has any bad kinks in it a little burnishing with a wooden dowel around the kink before stretching works well.

    Coarse copper wire should work but you might want to consider a larger "O" ring. The "O" ring use is based on the ability to drill holes to accept the radial copper ignition wires. The original ignition wires were covered in a copper braid to reduce EMI radio interference. This can be imitated by abraiding the copper wire by rolling it on a flat surface with 440 grit sandpaper before assembly. Anyway that's the plan..., let's see how it goes.

    Best regards, Gil
  10. bfam4t6

    bfam4t6 Member

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    Looks great Gil. One step closer, and the next step "shouldn't be too much of a challenge" :wink:
  11. charliec

    charliec Active Member

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    The I-16 certainly did have a constant speed prop. A quote from an article on flying a restored I-16.

    "At the hold, with the temperatures and pressures in the green, you stand on the brakes and start to increase power, hoping to get 760mm and about 2000 / 2100 RPM. There is a good chance the brakes will start to slip beforehand - say at 1700 - 1800 RPM, <u>so cycle the prop back and forth slowly once, twice and more quickly a third time</u>. Check the mags - not less that 100 drop per side. Next the simple pre take-off checks consist of

    Trim - N/A; Throttle Friction - tight; Mixture - rich; <u>Pitch - full fine;</u> Fuel contents, pressure, primer; Flaps - N/A; Gills - open; Oil cooler - open; Gyros - set; Instruments in the green; oxygen - N/A; Hood - N/A; Harness - tight and secure; Hydraulics - N/A (brakes holding?); Controls - full and free;"

    http://www.nzfpm.co.nz/articles/ratacwd3.htm

    The story on the restored I-16s can be found at:

    http://www.nzfpm.co.nz/aircraft/i16.htm

    Regards,

    Charlie
  12. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Thanks Charlie,

    The prop governor unit seems to have been matched with the propeller so if the prop was removed or exchanged so was the governor. Most of the Wright Cyclone museum display units are without the prop and governor. It would be interesting to have this confirmed.

    Best regards, Gil
  13. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Quick Update:

    Work proceeds on pushrods. Below is image of dry fit test photo. Rubber tubing and clamps are made out of wire insulation. I realize now that the diameter is too large..., Fall back on paper?

    Gil

    [​IMG]
  14. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    Perhaps just wind one or two turns of paper around the pushrods at top and bottom? VERY nice valve rocker casings! - Leif
  15. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Quick Update:

    Leif, took your advice and acquired a blank pad of vellum sheets for printing out the rubber tubing and clamp sections. Vellum has to be treated like overhead foils to prevent the ink from pooling. Vellum is very useful in this sort of application, thin and strong and forms fairly well. The top clamps are fairly small and fiddly..., the use of a vinly eraser and the end of an small embossing tool rolled everything up nicely. I haven't the time to post a photo tonight but will after final assembly. I think you'll like the results...,

    Best regards, Gil
  16. shrike

    shrike Guest

    The prop and governor are not matched, but both of them are very expensive, seperately rebuildable items, and so rarely find there way into display engines. In fact, many if not most, display engines are made up of unservicable parts and often missing most of the internal parts (valves, pistons, connecting rods, cams et c.)
    Add that to the fact that most of the engines were built with 'universal' accessory cases and you'll also rarely find gun-synch drives, vacuum pumps and hoards of other items. You will find neat covers blanking off the mounting pads.
  17. gera

    gera Member

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  18. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Gerardo,

    Neat article! Only issue is how to accurately (or even semi-accurately) punch out all the cooling fins for nine cylinders. Makes you wonder if anyone was ever successful in making one....,

    Best regards, Gil
  19. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    I love those other articles as well, thanks Gerardo! - Leif
  20. gera

    gera Member

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    This is a wonderful site, but it looks as if it´s not been updated anymore. I use to make "solids" and you can really pour detail in one of those jobs. It´s a question of research, patience and tools. I have promised myself that I will make one "again"....at least one in 1:48 or 1:35 scale. It will be a biplane, probably the "Goshawk" for its colorful outlook. :lol: :lol: