which layout should i go with?

Discussion in 'HO Scale Model Trains' started by HOtrainman, Jan 22, 2007.

  1. HOtrainman

    HOtrainman Member

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    title asks.

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]

    click to enlarge
  2. Glen Haasdyk

    Glen Haasdyk Active Member

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    I thinbk I like the first one better, It's simpler and the track isn't going everywhere.
  3. CNWman

    CNWman CNW Fan

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    how big are you going for? I know a 4X8 can't hold that
  4. nkp174

    nkp174 Active Member

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    A size would help. If that's a 4'x8', I'd guess you've got some 2" radius curves there. You might be able to get a 4 wheel locomotive around it...but probably not any cars after it. :)
  5. HOtrainman

    HOtrainman Member

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    it is a 5x8 layout.

    in the first, there is a key at top- 3 squares= 1 foot

    in the second, every 4 squares= 1 foot

    not drawn to scale
  6. Mountain Man

    Mountain Man Active Member

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    Can't really say. Without knowing the scale you are modelling in, the number of buildings and their sizes, your plans for industries or logging or whatever and all the rest, I can't really tell what you've got in mind.

    That being said, the first one looks a tad more reasonable than the second one.

    My final answer would be: Whichever one you like best. :)
  7. Triplex

    Triplex Active Member

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    Assume a bare minimum 18" curve -and that's radius, not diameter. You'll probably be disappointed at what can fit. Not that it's not possible to build a layout in this space - far from it. However, you won't be able to fit all sorts of meandering interconnected tracks.
  8. jetrock

    jetrock Member

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    But it is drawn to scale--4 sqares=1 foot is "drawn to scale." I realize this is a rough sketch, but some of the curves indicated would have to be no more than 4-5" radius, which is too tight for just about anything, even in N scale. Quite frankly, neither track plan is physically possible in the real world, and so I can't recommend that you pursue either one. I would recommend either downloading some track planning software (Atlas has a free track planning software), or buying some sectional track so you can actually get a sense of the size of the track and what will fit where.
  9. HOtrainman

    HOtrainman Member

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    link me- could not find

    the table is drawn to scale, but not the track. this is HO scale
  10. Triplex

    Triplex Active Member

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    And you can't plan a layout by drawing the table to scale but not the track.
  11. jetrock

    jetrock Member

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    http://www.atlasrr.com/righttrack.htm

    There isn't much point in drawing the table to scale but not the track. You'd have difficulty fitting that much track in a large room, let alone a small table: unless that table is a TARDIS you simply can't fit either of those track plans into a 4x8 space. Don't let my grouching discourage you, though: take a look at track plans online and in books, play around with the track-planning software, and you'll get a better feel for what works and what doesn't.
  12. Santa Fe Jack

    Santa Fe Jack Member

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    Another solution for playing with ideas is simply to get ahold of a drafting compass -- even a simple school one will do -- and set the points for a scale 18 inches. That is the tightest curve you can consider. It's a tough lesson when you first try it out, as you can't get in a lot of complexity that your brain is imagining. It's a very sobering exercise, but definitely necessary to bring the thing into reality.