When did you first learn of Card Models?

Discussion in 'General Card Modeling' started by thewoodengraver, Apr 16, 2007.

  1. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    I was 12...way back in 1974, I went to the Old Towne Mall in Torrance California. There was a hobby shop, they had " Six Little Ships and Galleons" from Micromodels.

    Unfortunately, the shop had no more Micromodels, and the owner told me they were out of business.

    Fortunately, 30 years later, when searching for pics of ships, I saw pics of the 6 little ships, memory was sparked, and the rest is history...

    Here are those 6 little ships...built TWE style next to the Mayflower built origional size.
  2. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    I was 12...way back in 1974, I went to the Old Towne Mall in Torrance California. There was a hobby shop, they had " Six Little Ships and Galleons" from Micromodels.

    Unfortunately, the shop had no more Micromodels, and the owner told me they were out of business.

    Fortunately, 30 years later, when searching for pics of ships, I saw pics of the 6 little ships, memory was sparked, and the rest is history...

    Here are those 6 little ships...built TWE style next to the Mayflower built origional size.
  3. sdk2knbk

    sdk2knbk Guest

    I used to make flat profile aircraft based on the profiles in library books. The next "real" paper model I made was based on an old Mars probe design from yet another library book. You would have liked it, Phil, only about an inch and a half long, including the main/fuel tank section, and detachable landing rocket. Then there were the couple of dozen "roll rockets." I'd roll up a sheet of paper, trim the bottom, add fins, and color it with markers. The first real commercial cardmodel I ever saw was the Meta Model XB-70. It was at a local sci-fi/gaming con, and unfortunately, I didn't have enough money left. I fixed that problem when I found it again a little over a year later at a local bookstore.

    Scott K.
  4. sdk2knbk

    sdk2knbk Guest

    I used to make flat profile aircraft based on the profiles in library books. The next "real" paper model I made was based on an old Mars probe design from yet another library book. You would have liked it, Phil, only about an inch and a half long, including the main/fuel tank section, and detachable landing rocket. Then there were the couple of dozen "roll rockets." I'd roll up a sheet of paper, trim the bottom, add fins, and color it with markers. The first real commercial cardmodel I ever saw was the Meta Model XB-70. It was at a local sci-fi/gaming con, and unfortunately, I didn't have enough money left. I fixed that problem when I found it again a little over a year later at a local bookstore.

    Scott K.
  5. MOS95B

    MOS95B Member

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    I forget how I stumbled upon it, but when The Missus and I were seprated a couple of years back, I found card modelling. It was cheap to do, a lot of cool free models, and kept me busy so I didn't have to deal with the putz I was rooming with until The Missus would let me come home...
  6. MOS95B

    MOS95B Member

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    I forget how I stumbled upon it, but when The Missus and I were seprated a couple of years back, I found card modelling. It was cheap to do, a lot of cool free models, and kept me busy so I didn't have to deal with the putz I was rooming with until The Missus would let me come home...
  7. dinsour

    dinsour Member

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    My first paper model

    My first card planes were the Jack Armstrong - wheaties models that came in a box of wheaties. You got 1 in the box but you could send a dime or so with 2 box tops I think. For that they would send you a set of 3 models. My first set was a P40, a Zero, and I think you got a spitfire. (not sure of the mix) That was about 1943. Then in the 60s some one was selling them for about 10 dollers a set. That rekindled my interest in card models. Unfortunatly I didn't have a copier then so once I built them they were gone.
    Recently the aiers to the man who designed them released a few as free down loads. I have built all of them a number of times for my grand kids.
    They love them because the are simple to make and they really fly. I run out of pennies to put in the nose for balance. LOL:grin:
    Then I discovered Fiddlers Green and it was off to the races.

    SO MANY MODELS AND SO LITTLE TIME. :(

    ---73 Ron
  8. dinsour

    dinsour Member

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    My first paper model

    My first card planes were the Jack Armstrong - wheaties models that came in a box of wheaties. You got 1 in the box but you could send a dime or so with 2 box tops I think. For that they would send you a set of 3 models. My first set was a P40, a Zero, and I think you got a spitfire. (not sure of the mix) That was about 1943. Then in the 60s some one was selling them for about 10 dollers a set. That rekindled my interest in card models. Unfortunatly I didn't have a copier then so once I built them they were gone.
    Recently the aiers to the man who designed them released a few as free down loads. I have built all of them a number of times for my grand kids.
    They love them because the are simple to make and they really fly. I run out of pennies to put in the nose for balance. LOL:grin:
    Then I discovered Fiddlers Green and it was off to the races.

    SO MANY MODELS AND SO LITTLE TIME. :(

    ---73 Ron
  9. cjd

    cjd Member

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    My Australian Aunt bought me a Birdmobile Merlin when I was about 10 - did'nt make a bad job of it either. I was also obsessed with origami.

    Chris
  10. cjd

    cjd Member

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    My Australian Aunt bought me a Birdmobile Merlin when I was about 10 - did'nt make a bad job of it either. I was also obsessed with origami.

    Chris
  11. Kaz

    Kaz Member

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    I was discussing in the IL2 Forums, or even in the chat lobby (when UBI had one :( ) about the most anticipated aircraft for one of the many patches Oleg had up his sleeve, I jokingly said the Natter, having just found a picture of it in a book, someone asked whay the heck is a natter, so a very quick Google found a model of one, with description and I posted that link.
    Returning to that link about 2 days later I discovered it was a card model from Chips site, one free GeeBee later and I was hooked, 2 CD's later, (Chip if you're reading this, I still have the ugly card that you wrap around the CD's for the English :D ) I have my daughter into the anime models as well.
  12. Kaz

    Kaz Member

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    I was discussing in the IL2 Forums, or even in the chat lobby (when UBI had one :( ) about the most anticipated aircraft for one of the many patches Oleg had up his sleeve, I jokingly said the Natter, having just found a picture of it in a book, someone asked whay the heck is a natter, so a very quick Google found a model of one, with description and I posted that link.
    Returning to that link about 2 days later I discovered it was a card model from Chips site, one free GeeBee later and I was hooked, 2 CD's later, (Chip if you're reading this, I still have the ugly card that you wrap around the CD's for the English :D ) I have my daughter into the anime models as well.
  13. Lex

    Lex Dollmaker

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    I started making plastic kits at 4 (if I remember correctly), and my first paper kit was a Lockheed Constellation (Which publisher was that again?) built at 9.
  14. Lex

    Lex Dollmaker

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    I started making plastic kits at 4 (if I remember correctly), and my first paper kit was a Lockheed Constellation (Which publisher was that again?) built at 9.
  15. paperbeam

    paperbeam Member

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    Really Nice Phil!

    What scale are those, by the way?

    My first exposure to paper/card models was pre-internet. It was almost an unknown, sparsely represented hobby where I lived (Alberta, Canada) at that point (about '88 or so).

    I learned about this paper model museum in Edmonton (called Strathcona but now closed), so when I took a trip up that way, I dropped in. What an eye-opener!:)

    Having been interested in designing and building wooden furniture/various models/toys, model railroading, RC, etc. I had no idea such a variety of paper designs existed in the world!

    Above my head hung various large airships, planes, etc. Over to one side were incredibly detailed European castles. On the other side were many more buildings, etc. that just blew me away.

    These things were made out of paper?!?

    I purchased some printed building sets with the intention of hanging onto them until I had more space to work. However, when that day arrived, I'd moved a few times and couldn't locate them anymore.

    My precious were gone!

    I put the hobby on the backburner for about a decade (with little access to paper models) until I got hooked up to the net. Then I discovered Fiddler's Green and the growing number of other paper model designers/publishers/retailers online.

    And now I design and sell my own line of Old West N/Z scale paper models on eBay (and soon at www.paperbeam.com).

    Thank you internet, and especially this forum!:-D

    Terry
  16. paperbeam

    paperbeam Member

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    Really Nice Phil!

    What scale are those, by the way?

    My first exposure to paper/card models was pre-internet. It was almost an unknown, sparsely represented hobby where I lived (Alberta, Canada) at that point (about '88 or so).

    I learned about this paper model museum in Edmonton (called Strathcona but now closed), so when I took a trip up that way, I dropped in. What an eye-opener!:)

    Having been interested in designing and building wooden furniture/various models/toys, model railroading, RC, etc. I had no idea such a variety of paper designs existed in the world!

    Above my head hung various large airships, planes, etc. Over to one side were incredibly detailed European castles. On the other side were many more buildings, etc. that just blew me away.

    These things were made out of paper?!?

    I purchased some printed building sets with the intention of hanging onto them until I had more space to work. However, when that day arrived, I'd moved a few times and couldn't locate them anymore.

    My precious were gone!

    I put the hobby on the backburner for about a decade (with little access to paper models) until I got hooked up to the net. Then I discovered Fiddler's Green and the growing number of other paper model designers/publishers/retailers online.

    And now I design and sell my own line of Old West N/Z scale paper models on eBay (and soon at www.paperbeam.com).

    Thank you internet, and especially this forum!:-D

    Terry
  17. FredZ KSAC

    FredZ KSAC Member

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    When a modeling friend came home from his military service in Germany, he brought with him a stack of Wilhelmshavener kits about 2 inches thick - which we split. This was in 1964 and we are STILL working off this pile! If fact, I am building the F8U Crusader as I type. These were printed on card stock sheets of about 18" x 24" and the price written on the first page of the F8U was 3 marks - about 25 cents US in 1964, the price now is 18 Euros [I think] These were hand drawn and in the case of the F8U, had multiple moving parts. The only problem with 43 year old paper is it is a little hard to work with :), and I build the original - I do not scan them. I didn't discover paper models on the internet until about 4 years ago and haven't looked back! Good hobby, great people to associate with - what more can you ask for.
    Later,
  18. FredZ KSAC

    FredZ KSAC Member

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    When a modeling friend came home from his military service in Germany, he brought with him a stack of Wilhelmshavener kits about 2 inches thick - which we split. This was in 1964 and we are STILL working off this pile! If fact, I am building the F8U Crusader as I type. These were printed on card stock sheets of about 18" x 24" and the price written on the first page of the F8U was 3 marks - about 25 cents US in 1964, the price now is 18 Euros [I think] These were hand drawn and in the case of the F8U, had multiple moving parts. The only problem with 43 year old paper is it is a little hard to work with :), and I build the original - I do not scan them. I didn't discover paper models on the internet until about 4 years ago and haven't looked back! Good hobby, great people to associate with - what more can you ask for.
    Later,
  19. RM_clermont

    RM_clermont Guest

    Like Nezard I began with plastics when I was 8 years old, but since I discovered the cardmodels in 2005 ... the plastics are in oblivion
  20. RM_clermont

    RM_clermont Guest

    Like Nezard I began with plastics when I was 8 years old, but since I discovered the cardmodels in 2005 ... the plastics are in oblivion