What's your dream job?

Discussion in 'Everything else' started by AdamN, May 2, 2005.

  1. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

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    I understand that things get published by serendipitously meeting up with an editor or agent who loves the idea. To do increase the chance of serendipity I'm planning on attending science-fiction conventions next summer. I'm going to enter my models in the convention art shows and also polish up my elevator speech (a synopsis of book idea in one sentence). My models so far have been great conversation starters for pitching my book.
    Have you considered modeling things from your story?
    I make my models small enough to fit easily in the hand. This tempts people to play with them and get involved with them tactilely.
  2. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

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    I understand that things get published by serendipitously meeting up with an editor or agent who loves the idea. To do increase the chance of serendipity I'm planning on attending science-fiction conventions next summer. I'm going to enter my models in the convention art shows and also polish up my elevator speech (a synopsis of book idea in one sentence). My models so far have been great conversation starters for pitching my book.
    Have you considered modeling things from your story?
    I make my models small enough to fit easily in the hand. This tempts people to play with them and get involved with them tactilely.
  3. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

    Joined:
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    I understand that things get published by serendipitously meeting up with an editor or agent who loves the idea. To do increase the chance of serendipity I'm planning on attending science-fiction conventions next summer. I'm going to enter my models in the convention art shows and also polish up my elevator speech (a synopsis of book idea in one sentence). My models so far have been great conversation starters for pitching my book.
    Have you considered modeling things from your story?
    I make my models small enough to fit easily in the hand. This tempts people to play with them and get involved with them tactilely.
  4. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

    Joined:
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    I understand that things get published by serendipitously meeting up with an editor or agent who loves the idea. To do increase the chance of serendipity I'm planning on attending science-fiction conventions next summer. I'm going to enter my models in the convention art shows and also polish up my elevator speech (a synopsis of book idea in one sentence). My models so far have been great conversation starters for pitching my book.
    Have you considered modeling things from your story?
    I make my models small enough to fit easily in the hand. This tempts people to play with them and get involved with them tactilely.
  5. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

    Joined:
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    I understand that things get published by serendipitously meeting up with an editor or agent who loves the idea. To do increase the chance of serendipity I'm planning on attending science-fiction conventions next summer. I'm going to enter my models in the convention art shows and also polish up my elevator speech (a synopsis of book idea in one sentence). My models so far have been great conversation starters for pitching my book.
    Have you considered modeling things from your story?
    I make my models small enough to fit easily in the hand. This tempts people to play with them and get involved with them tactilely.
  6. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

    Joined:
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    I understand that things get published by serendipitously meeting up with an editor or agent who loves the idea. To do increase the chance of serendipity I'm planning on attending science-fiction conventions next summer. I'm going to enter my models in the convention art shows and also polish up my elevator speech (a synopsis of book idea in one sentence). My models so far have been great conversation starters for pitching my book.
    Have you considered modeling things from your story?
    I make my models small enough to fit easily in the hand. This tempts people to play with them and get involved with them tactilely.
  7. Sumato

    Sumato Member

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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  8. Sumato

    Sumato Member

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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  9. Sumato

    Sumato Member

    Joined:
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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  10. Sumato

    Sumato Member

    Joined:
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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  11. Sumato

    Sumato Member

    Joined:
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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  12. Sumato

    Sumato Member

    Joined:
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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  13. Sumato

    Sumato Member

    Joined:
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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  14. Sumato

    Sumato Member

    Joined:
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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  15. Sumato

    Sumato Member

    Joined:
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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  16. Sumato

    Sumato Member

    Joined:
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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  17. Sumato

    Sumato Member

    Joined:
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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  18. Sumato

    Sumato Member

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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  19. Sumato

    Sumato Member

    Joined:
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    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.
  20. Sumato

    Sumato Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2005
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    I see that a number of you want to be pilots. I suggest that some of you go out and do it. The industry right now (and the forseeable future) is in great need of pilots (and controllers, mechanics, dispatchers, etc...) . Don't let what's happening at the majors dispell any of you from getting into it. The education will be expensive, about the same as a year or two of college, but with much better results at the end. I should point out though, some of the realities of the job.

    1- Like Rob said, it's damn hard work. Basically everyone who will hire you will exploit and abuse your love of flying. I work about 90 hrs a week, as it is.

    2-It is a risky career path. There are a LOT of things that can disqualify you from employment. Health is a big one. About 1 in 3 will 'medical out' of the profession before reaching 60. Eyesight is not a problem so long as it is correctable. Another is legal trouble, both with the FAA or local authorities. Drinking and driving (or flying) is also a pretty common disqualifier. Even needing too much training from time to time can end your career.

    3-Expect to move a lot. It is really tough to set up roots at one location. Some people do it, but there are enormous complications to it.

    4-Forget about your life as you know it. Being a professional aviator is very alienating to most people. Even your friends and family. No matter how much they claim to understand and love you, they WILL give up on you at times, though it's not their fault. Just expect to be gone- a lot.

    5-Your love of travel will also be very often stressed. A nice hotel room with a hot-tub sounds nice, but not when you've been there 150 times that year.

    6-There are also some REAL jerks in this industry, and can completely drain the life out of you, and your love of flying. You will not only work with them, but will fly with them, too.

    Now, having said all that, understand that I still wouldn't give it up for anything (except card-modeling). It is great to have a job where your decisions actually count, and your job matters, and it is absolutely essential for business that you show up. Good luck to any of you who try it. I'd be glad to offer what advice I can (off-list) to whomever seeks it.