what size.

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by jimbogibbo, Jan 4, 2006.

  1. jimbogibbo

    jimbogibbo Member

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    could someone tell me what gauge the lionel 8625 train set is???:confused:
  2. jetrock

    jetrock Member

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    O gauge, I'd reckon...
  3. jimbogibbo

    jimbogibbo Member

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    what size

    [
    what is the differance between o and g.?
  4. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    O scale is 1:48.

    G scale equipment is anything from about 1:20 to about 1:32, all running on the same gauge track.

    Gauge refers to the distance between the tracks. Standard gauge is 4' 8 1/2" - in the real world. This works out to ~ 1.2 real inches between the tracks in O scale, or 0.65 inches between the rails in HO scale, for example.

    For some reason that escapes me right now, O scale has been referred to as "O gauge" for some time...?

    Andrew
  5. jimbogibbo

    jimbogibbo Member

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    what size

    so in a nut shell what size is the lionel 8625 ?:confused:
  6. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Well, jetrock's guess was that it is O scale/gauge. Without any other information, I would agree this is the most likely. If the locomotive is over 12" long or higher than about 3 inches, it is a good bet.

    Do you have a picture of it? Lionel does make some HO stuff, so it is hard to be sure without any other info.

    Andrew
  7. RailRon

    RailRon Active Member

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    Early model railroads (before WW I) were much bigger than now. The two scales of the oldest Märklin model RRs (one of the first manufacturers) were more or less:

    Scale 1:22.5 ---> Track gauge was 64 millimeters (2.5") --> called gauge number II (two) .... and the smaller
    Scale 1:32 ---> Track gauge was 45 mm (1.77") --> Gauge number I

    Later, the scale was reduced further, and logically they chose the 'gauge number' 0 (zero, not the letter O!) So here goes:

    Scale 1:43.5 ---> Track gauge is 32 mm (1.25") --> Gauge number 0

    In German, this is still called 'Spur Null' = 'Gauge Zero', while in English it is more often called 'O gauge' (this time spoken as the letter O). :confused:

    But hold on: Around WW II still smaller models became possible, and so in continental Europe H0 was born. 'H0' is the letter H followed by the number 0, meaning 'Half 0':

    Scale 1:87 --> Track gauge is 16.5 mm (0.65") --> Gauge number H0

    In England, the designation 00 ('double o') was chosen instead - with a different scale of 1:76.

    Well, that's only (part of) the story of the Gauges H0 - 0 - I - II, but worldwide there are in fact more than 100 different track gauges and modeling scales for model RRs around! C-R-A-Z-Y!!! :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

    Only two more:
    S scale = 1:64 - S derived from 'Standard' --> the developers obviously dreamed of a new standard model RR size.
    N scale = 1:160 - N is derived from 'Nine' or German 'Neun', since track gauge is 9 mm (0.354")

    One thing I never understood is why the heck the developers of those model railroads chose such absurd and idiotic scales: 1:22.5, 1:43.5, 1:76, 1:87, 1:120 (TT scale)... :eek: :eek: :eek:
    Why not 1:20 (or perhaps 1:24), 1:50, 1:75 or 1:100??? :confused: Probably we'll never know... :(

    Ron
  8. jetrock

    jetrock Member

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    [​IMG]
    um, actually that wasn't a guess...the Lionel 8625 is an O gauge locomotive. It's not really "O scale" because Lionel toy-train equipment isn't really to scale--while O scale is 1/48, O gauge track is 1.25" wide--5 feet wide in 1/48, actually 3.5" wider than standard gauge railroad track!

    I was just going to type "O" and submit the reply, but the Gauge message board frowns on one-word message responses, so I added the reckoning...
  9. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    It was the reckoning that made me think it was a guess... but I knew it to be an educated guess! ;)

    Apologies...

    Andrew