What else do you make models from ?

Discussion in 'Extended Mediums' started by Mark_1984, Apr 20, 2007.

  1. DrBill

    DrBill Member

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    I got started with card models back in the '40s with (I think) Shredded Wheat separators (a couple of pieces of card stock in between the biscuits). Then moved to solid wood in the late '40s or early '50s (still have a P-61 from those days, all the worse for wear), then moved to plastic with the occasional stick and tissue model. I was reintroduced to paper around 1980 when San Antonio Hobby in Mountain View, CA still carried a bunch of Schreiber ships and architecture. But the supply was limited and I continued with plastic for the next few years. After moving to Connecticut, I switched to stick and tissue (penny weight stuff) and completely abandoned plastic. Still have loads of unbuilt Airfix, Italieri, etc., from the '70s and '80s in the basement. Then I found Chip's free Piper Cub on the Internet (1998 or 1999) and got religion. A few more freebies from "Zio" Prudenziati, and then a real order with PMI and ModelArt (1:72 models -- real gems), and I was solidly hooked. A long and convoluted history -- though probably not a lot different from other geezers on the list -- but I can't imagine ever going back. (I wonder how many others got introduced or reintroduced to card modeling by Chip's Piper Cub...)
  2. DrBill

    DrBill Member

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    I got started with card models back in the '40s with (I think) Shredded Wheat separators (a couple of pieces of card stock in between the biscuits). Then moved to solid wood in the late '40s or early '50s (still have a P-61 from those days, all the worse for wear), then moved to plastic with the occasional stick and tissue model. I was reintroduced to paper around 1980 when San Antonio Hobby in Mountain View, CA still carried a bunch of Schreiber ships and architecture. But the supply was limited and I continued with plastic for the next few years. After moving to Connecticut, I switched to stick and tissue (penny weight stuff) and completely abandoned plastic. Still have loads of unbuilt Airfix, Italieri, etc., from the '70s and '80s in the basement. Then I found Chip's free Piper Cub on the Internet (1998 or 1999) and got religion. A few more freebies from "Zio" Prudenziati, and then a real order with PMI and ModelArt (1:72 models -- real gems), and I was solidly hooked. A long and convoluted history -- though probably not a lot different from other geezers on the list -- but I can't imagine ever going back. (I wonder how many others got introduced or reintroduced to card modeling by Chip's Piper Cub...)
  3. Rick Thomson

    Rick Thomson Member

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    Mostly it's cardstock now, but I still occasionally do plastic, and my masterpiece was done in metal, ok not my masterpiece, but my journeyman piece for my trades qualifications.
  4. Rick Thomson

    Rick Thomson Member

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    Mostly it's cardstock now, but I still occasionally do plastic, and my masterpiece was done in metal, ok not my masterpiece, but my journeyman piece for my trades qualifications.
  5. Rick Thomson

    Rick Thomson Member

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    <(I wonder how many others got introduced or reintroduced to card modeling by Chip's Piper Cub...)>

    Guilty as charged, my Lord...
  6. Rick Thomson

    Rick Thomson Member

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    <(I wonder how many others got introduced or reintroduced to card modeling by Chip's Piper Cub...)>

    Guilty as charged, my Lord...
  7. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

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    Yeah, me to! Plastic, that is. I love the idea of paper models, and I have nearly finished several, and designed a few others, but I still stray back to my roots. I designed a resin M4A4 conversion kit for the Tamiya M4 Sherman in 1:48 scale recently that seems to have gone down quite well 'over there' in plastic-resin-etched-brassland, and recently I treated myself to a Heng Long 1:16th scale Panzer III radio controlled model, which of course has completely distracted me, so much in fact that now there is a Churchill Mk IV on my Rhino drawing board, with gearboxes already designed and made....

    I just love models, full stop. (period, for you on the west side of the pond...) I am lucky to be a modelmaker for my day job, so I must be seriously deranged to want to do modelling as a hobby as well.

    But I don't actually care what a model is made of, provided it is a bit of a challange. You can always tell models that have been made where the modelmaker was stretched a bit, and when they have that 'honesty' built into them, they shine! Whether it is a first attempt at a paper model, or a fully working 1/4 Merlin firing on all twelve cylinders, you can tell if it was made with passion. At that is what REALLY matters....whatever the materials used.

    Tim
  8. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

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    Yeah, me to! Plastic, that is. I love the idea of paper models, and I have nearly finished several, and designed a few others, but I still stray back to my roots. I designed a resin M4A4 conversion kit for the Tamiya M4 Sherman in 1:48 scale recently that seems to have gone down quite well 'over there' in plastic-resin-etched-brassland, and recently I treated myself to a Heng Long 1:16th scale Panzer III radio controlled model, which of course has completely distracted me, so much in fact that now there is a Churchill Mk IV on my Rhino drawing board, with gearboxes already designed and made....

    I just love models, full stop. (period, for you on the west side of the pond...) I am lucky to be a modelmaker for my day job, so I must be seriously deranged to want to do modelling as a hobby as well.

    But I don't actually care what a model is made of, provided it is a bit of a challange. You can always tell models that have been made where the modelmaker was stretched a bit, and when they have that 'honesty' built into them, they shine! Whether it is a first attempt at a paper model, or a fully working 1/4 Merlin firing on all twelve cylinders, you can tell if it was made with passion. At that is what REALLY matters....whatever the materials used.

    Tim
  9. Rick Thomson

    Rick Thomson Member

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    A functioning 1/4 Merlin? That would have to have it's own entry in the O.E.D. under Cool.
  10. Rick Thomson

    Rick Thomson Member

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    A functioning 1/4 Merlin? That would have to have it's own entry in the O.E.D. under Cool.
  11. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

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  12. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

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  13. Fishcarver

    Fishcarver Active Member

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    Vote me into the multi-media gang!

    I actually discovered card modelling quite by accident, in (of all places) a taxidermy magazine where I encountered an article on using paper to model various habitat items. Once I conducted further reasearch and some experiments, I was hooked.(mind you, my first love is and always has been finescale modeling in whatever medium).

    Jim
  14. Fishcarver

    Fishcarver Active Member

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    Vote me into the multi-media gang!

    I actually discovered card modelling quite by accident, in (of all places) a taxidermy magazine where I encountered an article on using paper to model various habitat items. Once I conducted further reasearch and some experiments, I was hooked.(mind you, my first love is and always has been finescale modeling in whatever medium).

    Jim
  15. Mark_1984

    Mark_1984 Guest

    Awesome - the sort of thing that makes it worth going to the Model Engineer exhibitions :) On a par with the French chaps 1/3 (or was it 1/4) scale Ferrari that was perfect in every detail and sounded just like the real thing
  16. Mark_1984

    Mark_1984 Guest

    Awesome - the sort of thing that makes it worth going to the Model Engineer exhibitions :) On a par with the French chaps 1/3 (or was it 1/4) scale Ferrari that was perfect in every detail and sounded just like the real thing
  17. Dnlgtr

    Dnlgtr Member

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    I started with Plastic, & still do a LOT of that.
    Can't find too many Muscle & classic cars in PAper.
    When was the last time you saw a EDSEL in paper??
    How many American Fire engines do you see??
    I have between 500 & 1000!!!! Plastic kits!!! Plus a few DieCast too. But mostly only ones that were never produced in plastic.
    I do draw the line at Large scale. Anything Over 1/24-25 is OFF Limits.
  18. Dnlgtr

    Dnlgtr Member

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    I started with Plastic, & still do a LOT of that.
    Can't find too many Muscle & classic cars in PAper.
    When was the last time you saw a EDSEL in paper??
    How many American Fire engines do you see??
    I have between 500 & 1000!!!! Plastic kits!!! Plus a few DieCast too. But mostly only ones that were never produced in plastic.
    I do draw the line at Large scale. Anything Over 1/24-25 is OFF Limits.
  19. 72BMWR75/5

    72BMWR75/5 Member

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    plastic, gasp

    When I was in elementary school, my mom signed me up for a model of the month club kind of thing. Every month I got a new model in the mail. Never knew what I was going to get. I can remember a little Mayflower ship, a German triplane and a lunar lander.
    Back in the 80's I had a roommate who was an absolute artist with plastic models. He only did WWII aircraft in a fairly large scale. He researched paint schemes and painted them with an airbrush. They were museum quality.
    I started building 1/72 scale planes. I couldn't paint worth a darn, but they were fun.
    That's what I like about paper. No painting.
  20. 72BMWR75/5

    72BMWR75/5 Member

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    plastic, gasp

    When I was in elementary school, my mom signed me up for a model of the month club kind of thing. Every month I got a new model in the mail. Never knew what I was going to get. I can remember a little Mayflower ship, a German triplane and a lunar lander.
    Back in the 80's I had a roommate who was an absolute artist with plastic models. He only did WWII aircraft in a fairly large scale. He researched paint schemes and painted them with an airbrush. They were museum quality.
    I started building 1/72 scale planes. I couldn't paint worth a darn, but they were fun.
    That's what I like about paper. No painting.