Weathering

Discussion in 'Scratchin' & Bashin'' started by plbab, Nov 29, 2003.

  1. plbab

    plbab Member

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    I have just purchased 2 Conerstone kits Red Wing Milling, and Northeren Power and Light. I want to weather them so they look more realistic. What is a good weathering technique? This will be my first attempt at kitbashing and weathering. Thanks Paul
  2. MCL_RDG

    MCL_RDG Member

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    All I know is...

    ...it's gotta be. Have you been where they mill metal and produce energy- you might be suprised.

    Mark
  3. Ralph

    Ralph Remember...it's for fun!

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    I like colored chalks. The nice thing is they can be wiped off if you don't like the results. A nice technique for experimenting...
    Best wishes!
    Ralph
  4. Matthyro

    Matthyro Will always be re-membered

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    Ralph's suggestion is the best. Another method you may try are washes of acrylic craft paints and water. The two colours I use most often are raw sienna and burnt umber
  5. Fred_M

    Fred_M Guest

    I also like acrylic washes and I do the whole structure to knock off the plastic shine. I also use light gray as a weathering color, esp on brick. Then I follow up with pastel chalk dust if I want more. DASH
  6. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

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    Dry-brushing is another useful technique...the term means that after you dip your brush into the paint, you take a rag, & wipe off most of the paint...it's great for simulating streaks of rust, grease, etc...
    All of the weathering techniques mentioned here work well on their own, or in combination...get out an old junk model to practice on, & give it a whirl!
    One more tip...no matter what technique you start with...use very light & subtle weathering...if you want a heavily weathered look, build up to it, instead of all at once.
    Good luck, & have some fun! :)
  7. Tileguy

    Tileguy Member

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    All of the above are excellant methods.For a complete arsenal though, i would add washes of india ink and rubbing alcohol .a few drops of india ink in a few tablespoons of alcohol.As always,practice on a scrap piece of material until you get the look you want.Dont forget to dullcoat everything;)