Weathered Steam Locomotives! (Paging Lester Perry& Dr. Wayne, and anyone else!)

Discussion in 'Weathering Forum' started by MilesWestern, Nov 6, 2007.

  1. MilesWestern

    MilesWestern Active Member

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    I present my newest Weathered locomotive, a C&O heavy 4-8-2.

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    I thought of Lester Perry, and all you modelers of steam when I did this one up! I wonder if any of you would be interested in having me weather any of your steam locomotives in the near future?
  2. nachoman

    nachoman Guest

    Looking good, Miles. That steamer definitely looks like a well-used specimen nearing the end of its life. Steamers are a bit tricky to weather because color photographs from that era are rare, and today's tourist steamers typically don't see as much use and probably recieve more frequent washings and paintings than the average road engine of 1940. Coal dust and cinders make everything dirty pretty quickly, and those moving siderods tend to splatter everything below the running boards with dust and grease.

    Kevin
  3. bigsteel

    bigsteel Call me Mr.Tinkertrain

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    wow,that looks great miles :thumb:,not only is it C&O :mrgreen: its one of the best steam weathering i'e ever seen :eek:.i would never take the chance of weathering on a steam engine,i'd be afraid to ruin something that cost soooo much :rolleyes:.great job.--josh
  4. Gary S.

    Gary S. Senior Member

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    Hey Miles, I like it too. Thanks for sharing the photos. Good job. Did you do that one for yourself, or for someone else?

    Now that I think about it, I am betting it is for someone else.
  5. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Wow... Nicely done. But how long has that poor guy been sitting in the cab going nowhere? Judging by the rust on the side rods, this engine has not moved in some time. Even near the very end, the running gear would have been liberally lubricated. Let the boiler jacket rust, or run on a flue extension, but if the side rods don't move, neither does the engine. ;)

    BTW, that really is beautiful rust! :thumb: :thumb: It just makes me sad to see it on a steamer! :rolleyes:

    Andrew
  6. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    I have to agree with Andrew, Miles, the rust looks great. However, as he notes, the rods and other running gear were more likely to be covered in oil and grease, especially on a loco near the end of its service life. I don't recall seeing a lot of rust on steamers unless they'd been sitting in a dead line for some time. The most likely places to rust were those that got the hottest, notably the firebox and smokebox. Many roads, at least when the locos were maintained, applied a mixture of oil and graphite to these areas, while others, such as Espee, painted the smokebox silver. And when a steam locomotive is operating, everything gets a liberal coating of soot and cinders, but especially horizontal surfaces like the running boards, and the top of the boiler and cab. Some roads weren't too fussy about the appearance, while others had a force of engine wipers just to keep things looking spiffy.
    Before applying rust, think of the function of the parts: other than wheel treads, couplers, and bearing surfaces, almost every part of a steam locomotive was painted. Fittings that leaked water or steam were more likely to show a discolouration due to mineral deposits, rather than rust, and moving parts, particularily around the bearing surfaces, often showed signs of lubrication leakage. The piston rods, or at least the part the moves within the cylinders, should be shiny, even on a heavily weathered loco.
    I hope this information will be of some help in your weathering endeavors, Miles. As Josh notes, weathering a steam loco is a job that many approach with trepidation, if they approach it at all. ;):-D:-D

    Wayne
  7. MilesWestern

    MilesWestern Active Member

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    thanks guys I added oil as a finishing touch and it"s not shown here in these photographs


    the engine had polished off some rusty patched by moving it"s running gear and has provided a really interesting effect

    Im in the process of making some subtle changes to this model to reflect in service equipment i removed the rust from the airpumps on the front and along the drivers as well


    gary yes this is for a client how about some of your stuff?

    sorry about the bad puncuation< i managed to get "sticky keys" on>
  8. CNWman

    CNWman CNW Fan

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    If I ever get any...:p
  9. jr switch

    jr switch Member

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    The heavily weathered C&O

    Gentlemen---He is doing it for me and these are the first photo's Iv'e seen. Miles, I am totally impressed. You are getting exactly the look I wanted. Keep going with the very dirty grainy look, that's what I'm looking for. So far Buddy, it looks great and I'll do a complete thread on it for the forum when I get it back. Thanks again Miles--
  10. bigsteel

    bigsteel Call me Mr.Tinkertrain

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    hey JR,long time no..well...posting :mrgreen:.and from just looking at miles photos,you are DEFINATLEY getting your moneys worth :thumb:.i cant wait to see his revisions to it!--josh
  11. nachoman

    nachoman Guest

    Other areas to look for rust on a steamer: The top of the cab roof and the top of the tender tank. I have seen the siderods accumulate lots of DUST in a short timespan. Some areas have that reddish fine dust that sticks to everything, especially oiled surfaces :)

    Kevin
  12. jr switch

    jr switch Member

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    weathered steam engines

    Hey Josh, how have you been? Something I was going to share earlier and forgot at the time-----I went into Kokomo this afternoon and bought a Rivarossi " Big Boy". Iv'e been wanting one for a good while, missed the Micro-Mark special on them and stumbled on to this one and thought I'd better bite the bullet and get it while availiable. At just a hair over $300, I think I did ok.
    This is my second Rivarossi and they seem to be pretty well made. My "Hudson" has run perfectly since new. Also, for you steamer fans out there, Iv'e recently added three IHC engines to the collection and they are top notch. Two Mountains and an 0-8-0. These are the smoothest running engines I have. My new good friend and weathering pro, Miles bought my IHC 2-10-2 and he will get many years of service out of it.
    He doesn't know it yet, but he has an A-B-A F-series to do next------------JR
  13. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    Great looking work,:thumb:. If I wanted my steamer weathered, you would be the one to do it.

    Loren
  14. MilesWestern

    MilesWestern Active Member

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    Thanks Everyone, Jr.Switch in Particular! I still need to add some finishing touches, and then I'll be sending this beauty off to Indiana! :)

    Hmm? Do I see "F" units in my future, mmmmm!! :)
  15. bigsteel

    bigsteel Call me Mr.Tinkertrain

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    JR,still havent started the layout and the Geeps are still running strong :thumb:.and that big boy sounds awesome! if i had the money to buy one i would,even though i model C&O,UP did have soem AWESOME steamers :thumb:.

    miles,with the way this steamer looks now,i couldnt wait to see some F-units :eek:.JR,for the sake of us less talented,let miles weather the F's announce1 :rolleyes:.im always amazed with your work miles.keep it up and remember to post updated pics of the re-oiled engine :mrgreen:.--josh
  16. cdavenport

    cdavenport Member

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    A photographer's observation on your excellent modeling; in some of your photos, the detail in the locomotive is lost likely because the white base/background fooled your camera's light metering system into thinking there was more light thereby selecting a smaller aperture. In the close-ups, there appears to be a fill light, but also more of the "black" locomotive is filling the frame telling the camera to open the lens.

    You can circumvent this problem in three ways. Use a neutral gray background. All light metering systems are calibrated to a known standard which turns out to be a light gray (more or less). Second, override your camera's exposure setting by increasing the exposure value by one to two stops. Finally, on black locomotives, always use a fill light source. An easy one is a piece of white foam core just outside the frame. You will be surprised at how much light it will reflect back on the subject.
  17. MilesWestern

    MilesWestern Active Member

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    Thank You EXTREMELY MUCH!!! I really was wondering how to calibrate the apperature. I'll try that in my next round of photos in just a few seconds... :)
  18. MilesWestern

    MilesWestern Active Member

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    Ok, here's the new round of photos on my light gray turnable with more color corrected shots.

    ALSO(!!) Note the road grime has replaced rust in the running gear, and a liberal coat of grime has been applied to all the right places! I also aged ans sunbleached the wood deck to bring out the grain, and the realism.

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    Comments? How do you like this now!? :)
  19. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    I like the scale build-up on the injector, and around the check valve and pops, too. I think that your changes have improved it, although it's still too rusty for my tastes. ;):-D As long as the customer likes it, though, then you've done a good job. :thumb:

    Wayne
  20. CNWman

    CNWman CNW Fan

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    Wow, that engine looks even BETTER! This baby looks as if it's seen the rails alot with too few washings (not that not enough washings is a bad thing...)