Video Series - "how to" build an epoxy fibreglass warbird mould

Discussion in 'RC Aircraft & Watercraft' started by Slow & Low, Apr 19, 2008.

  1. Slow & Low

    Slow & Low New Member

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    ...........

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  2. Slow & Low

    Slow & Low New Member

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    Scuffed everything up after the cloth was on with some 100 grit and hit it with another thinned coat of epoxy before retiring last night. Found some time this afternoon to get at it with some 150 grit on the longboard and hit it again with some el cheapo primer. Still plenty of work to do, but it's further along than it was...
    Of course I had to do the requisite mock up to make sure that the wing still fit the saddle. I'm not happy with fit up front where the bellypan, wing fillet, and leading edge meet up. The fit is still good and tight, but there's room for asthetic improvement. I'll do some more finishing on the underside before getting to those things though.

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  3. Slow & Low

    Slow & Low New Member

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  4. Slow & Low

    Slow & Low New Member

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    ...just taking some photos for my own future reference - thought I'd post a couple for those of us who enjoy watching bodywork - personally, I find pictures much more entertaining than the real thing

    I actually laid down another super thin coat of epoxy on the top surface of the wing since the last post trying to fill a few minor fisheye type situations, but it didn't really change very much, so I sanded it off, primed it again and was forced to get out the glazing putty this afternoon. Things are moving in right direction again. What am I doing? sanding, sanding, sanding, sanding, sanding.........

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  5. Slow & Low

    Slow & Low New Member

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    I promise not to make you sit through every step of the finishing process, but people keep asking me how much sanding is really required. I can't give a straight answer, but I should be able to bore you enough to get the idea across! lol Today, I hit the topside again with some glazing putty, and then sanded it with 220 followed by some 600. It's starting to take shape. The underside needs a guide coat of primer before I can tell where I'm at after a couple of thinned coats of epoxy. Actually, I put some microballoons in the last coat on the underside to help with the sanding last time so it shouldn't be too far off. Unfortunately it's below zero out in the shed, so I will have to set up a little spray booth inside the backroom in the basement and ventilate out the window. Stay tuned....

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  6. Slow & Low

    Slow & Low New Member

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    Over the course of the last month I've been spending my spare time on some of the areas on the underside of the wing plug that need special attention with respect to draft/release considerations. It's one thing to decide to mould wheel and flap bay details, but it's quite another thing to maintain a level of calm persistence as you spend hour after hour after hour holding a little tiny sanding block as your fingers lock up and eventually refuse to hold the darn thing forcing you to stop until the next day.
    At first I spent a great deal of time building up draft in the wheel and flap servo recesses with glazing putty. It was boring, but my 4" wheels fit the bays like they should, and release shouldn't be a problem. It's taking some time, no question about it, but every day it moves closer. One of the things that consumes time is the method that I'm using to build up fillet radii in the the tight spots.
    In order blend everything in the flap bays, I'm brushing on a light coat of thinned finishing epoxy. I leave it for 8 hours and then sand, prime, and repeat. The thinned epoxy flows very nicely into the corners and has a self-leveling characteristic that just can't be beat. You spend an inhumane amount of time sanding - but what you don't want is a beautiful wing plug sitting in the corner trapped inside a fibreglass sarcophagus ;)

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  7. MTK

    MTK Active Member

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    I agree with you CJ. this mans work is fantastic. Too bad you never got to finish your thread and was banned. I'm sure you haven't given up though and sincerely wish you the best.

    I really have to watch all of these videos!:thumb:

  8. Slow & Low

    Slow & Low New Member

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    I'd actually stopped making posts here because I thought the site went down a while ago. If you're still interested in following along, I can certainly start again. Since I was here last I've finished fibreglassing the wing and posted a short video of the process. You can check it out here if you like. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2EHbxmtHlk
  9. Slow & Low

    Slow & Low New Member

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    Panel Lines - End Round One

    I know that at first glance this can look a little ugly but these are not intended to be the typical chart tape and built-up primer panel lines. There are many planes that I might still take that approach with, but a 1940's P-40 is not one of them.

    There's a little bit of artistic license to this, in that the roughly blended leading edge of the seam falls off abruptly into a crisp clean trailing edge where it met the tape. This makes it difficult to focus the eye in the detail and so it moves quickly down the seam and finally falls into the flat centre of the panel. It's actually not overly realistic if you take a good look at the real thing, but this is a model that is viewed from several feet away and so I find that impression is more important than a perfectly scale detail that wouldn't be seen anyway. Perceived realism if you like. It takes some effort, but I can almost guarantee that you'll be the only one at the field with anything like it. Flite Metal or other foil approaches are good too, but I like the look of this for some reason. And hey - so far it's probably cost me about $3 in finishing epoxy and sandpaper - that always make me smile. [​IMG]

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  10. Slow & Low

    Slow & Low New Member

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    Gun bay access panels this week.

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