VICTORIAN STYLE TRAMWAY HALT SHELTER

Discussion in 'Card Model Kits' started by carlos filipe, Mar 14, 2015.

  1. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    A vey pleasant model from Purple Bob's, a British manufacturer that also sells die cut windows.
    http://purplebob.co.uk/product-category/7mm-scale-card-model-building-kits/
    Construction is straightforward, but I opted to fill in the interior of the walls with heavy cardstock.
    Made two mistakes that ruin the realism of the model.
    Distressed the paper, heavy handed on the folding exposing too much the white of the paper and didn't cut the tabs to glue new ones form inside allowing butt gluing.
    The model comes with extra parts to build up volume.
    I still don't know if I will use this model for a tramway layout in 0 scale or leave as an individual piece.
    Anyhow I intend to piant a Phoenix figure in 1/43 to give a sense of scale victorian-shelter-1.43 (1).JPG

    Attached Files:

  2. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator

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    It is very nice. I like it.
    You did a GREAT JOB on it!!!
  3. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    Thank you Rhaven Blaack.
  4. kcorbin

    kcorbin New Member

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    You did a nice job on assembling the model and I like the design of the building. The graphics are really good overall but it is a shame that they did not bother to get the brick laying along the corners correct. If you are going to design a miniature brick building you design the size of it in units of bricks so it all comes out correct for the brick pattern. Bricks are not an after thought, they determine the structural size of a building, they essentially are a unit of measurement needed by the architect for building designs.To each length of brick you add one width of mortar to one end and also at the top of the brick height to create the unit of measurement.

    For a standard brick there is an easy formula, the longest side of the brick is equal to the width of two of the shorter adjacent end sides plus the width of the grout line. This regularity of size is required to build strong walls that can be evenly laid. It also allows for uniform patterns that are easily created by the brick layer. In a standard size brick the height of the brick is three heights plus two mortar widths equals the longest side of the brick.Even the sizes of windows on a building and their placement are determined by the size of the bricks. The same is true of the doors. Nothing on a brick building is random because the bricks are the unit of measurement used to design the building.
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2015
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  5. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    I noticed that problem with the bricks, but must admit I messed up with the alignment of the parts too. I'm now trying to disguise the too obvious with watercolour retouches.
  6. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator

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    One way out is to make the corners of different bricks made such that the form a boxes at the corners. I did a quick "Render below, to show how you could "cheat" at it. ;)


    Brick cheat.jpg
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  7. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    I see. I considered to cut all faces of the walls and use them to "clad" a thick cardstock structure as you show in your rendering Zathros. But wasn't feeling that sure about that method.
    I think next project of that kind I'll try that approach.
    Thank you for the time you took thinking about the issue.
  8. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator

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    For you Carlos, the world! :)
  9. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    Thank you my good friend.
  10. goodduck

    goodduck Active Member

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    Hey, that is a nice build and gave a some idea too.
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  11. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    I'm quite tempted to give a try to paper models in railway layouts.
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  12. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator

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    Many years ago, I use to belong to a model rail road club. Many of the building (on the club layout) were made of paper (most were scratch built).
    I would like to see how yours turn out and how they look on the layout!
    I wish you the best of luck with it!
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  13. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    I'm looking at the tramway shelter and the Edwardian public toilet as "candidates" for a mini-layout in O16.5/On30 set in the Southern British coast. I have some kits (that I never finish the building....) and would like to have them on something small to keep home, but portable to take out to exhibitions.
    I saw many time as I could the layout built by the guys from Clever Models and it is irresistible not to consider paper as a good and affordable media for the scenery.
  14. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator

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    One of the main goals of this forum, is to show others that paper model building can (and does) apply to so many other hobbies (like model rail roads).
    I am looking forward to seeing more of your wonderful work in this area.
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  15. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    A very good principle. Paper has been "cornered" and much dismissed.
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  16. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator

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    INDEED, it has!
    Case in point, until, I had discovered this forum (back in 2009), when i told people (that I knew) that I was into paper model building, they would think that I was a bit off my rocker (even though that may be true in some respects). So for the longest time, I thought that I was the only one that was doing this sort of model building.
    Now with that being said, I have seen paper models on the market, but these were more designed and "children's toys" that you would get and a museum or a handout that your child could get at a restaurant (with the "Kidd's" menu). I never found a paper model that was a true model. Something that I could build and took skill to do it (and be proud to display).
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  17. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator

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    I founder paper to be a better alternative to vacuum forming, which I was just starting to get through. That process lacked detail, though it does handle compound curves excellently. I am a firm believer now of mixed media. Whatever it takes, to make a real representation of what you are modeling, or imagining. :)
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  18. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    I'm not a "purist" either. Whatever works, I'll use.
    One of the things I learned working balsa was that cyano glue hardens the soft balsa.
    Tested it with paper and it turns it very hard, kind of plasticized. This way it is possible to putty, sand and paint. That gives so much freedom!
  19. kcorbin

    kcorbin New Member

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    Cyano glue is great but some precautions many people don't know about

    From Wikipedia.
    Reaction with cotton
    Applying cyanoacrylate to some natural materials such as cotton, leather or wool (cotton swabs, cotton balls, and certain yarns or fabrics) results in a powerful, rapid exothermic reaction. The heat released may cause serious burns,[20] ignite the cotton product, or release irritating white smoke. Material Safety Data Sheets for cyanoacrylate instruct users not to wear cotton or wool clothing, especially cotton gloves, when applying or handling cyanoacrylates.

    Also note that repeated exposure to CA glues can lead to being sensitized to it. That does not happen to everyone however if you start feeling like you have the flu whenever you use it you have become sensitized.
  20. carlos filipe

    carlos filipe carlos filipe

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    I can testify that weird chemical reaction is happening during the process. It releases nasty smelly fumes. When I'm doing this procedure I always keep my face a good distance. But there are so many chemicals in our hobby....