Turnout controller

Discussion in 'Tips & Tricks' started by Nomad, Sep 7, 2008.

  1. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,634
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello all. :wave:
    I would like to show the turnout controllers i am using on my switching layout. I saw this idea on another forum and they work great. They also reduce the under the layout work, since they are table top mounted. Very simply a dpdt slide switch and a piece of spring steel wire. Very positive throw and they lock into position tightly.
    They do not show that much, and with a little paint and scenery i think they will blend in very well.

    Loren

    Attached Files:

  2. Ralph

    Ralph Remember...it's for fun!

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2002
    Messages:
    5,347
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm intrigued Loren. Show us an update after scenery is added.
    Ralph
  3. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,634
    Likes Received:
    0
    I will Ralph, but it will be a while. I plan on working on this layout all winter.

    Loren
  4. Ralph

    Ralph Remember...it's for fun!

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2002
    Messages:
    5,347
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'll be waiting for an update in 2009 then! :) I do like this idea....and may mess around with it a little.

    Ralph
  5. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,634
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am real happy with this setup. I also have an idea of making a tool out of ready-rod ( which I have, so I will use that ) and an eye hook bent at a 45 to reach in and throw the switch. Keep my fat fingers away from the rolling stock and scenery.
    P,S. I am using sub mini switches, so they are not that noticable even now.

    Loren
  6. jesso

    jesso Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2006
    Messages:
    725
    Likes Received:
    0
    One of our members makes all of his turnout controllers that way! The best thing with them is, you can use three wires and makes the them power routing, which is really nice when the electrofrog switches get old and dirty and no longer route the power through the track.
  7. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,634
    Likes Received:
    0
    Very true, Jesso. I think they could also be used for signals.

    Loren
  8. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Messages:
    2,448
    Likes Received:
    148
    in sceanery

    I stumbled across this solution back in 1974, trying to get reliable control of stub switches.

    I Had a portable RR built in 1975, and scrapped in 2008. That railroad had seven switches similarly controlled in the life of the RR two of the DPDT switches had to be replaced.

    Note I get double pole switches and wire both sides together, so that I have some redundancy, if one contact is bad or dirty, the other will carry it. I use this method everywhere on my RR, and have had few problems. I use a modification of this even with comercial switches


    Here is a picture of one near some basic scenery

    pictures of my RR the DG CC & W RR are founf in the logging, minning and industrial section

    Bill Nelson

    Attached Files:

  9. Wastrel

    Wastrel BNSF fan

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would like to know what amperage rating you are using on these switches. I would like to use them to power route as well as operate the switch.
  10. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Messages:
    2,448
    Likes Received:
    148
    aperage rating?

    I have no idea of what the numbers are, I think the switches I use (the bags are long gone are rated for 120 v. ) amperage @ 12 v is is neglegable. all of mine have been used for power routing. if you look at the picture of the stub switch there is no contact where the points would be on a point switch, so using the switch power routing is neccesary. I use this set up on point switches as well so I don't have to rely on point stock rail contact for power, as eventually some dirt or adjustment issues will ocur.


    very rarely I'll have contact issues inside the switch, usually that can be fixed with a shot of tunner cleaner. I have used this techniqe for over 30 years, on a big railroad (documented in the logging and Minning sub forum) and have only replaced three of the little switches.. back in the dark ages, when I used electric switch machines, they were high on the list of what needs maintenace, where maintenane issues seldom occur with this method of bendind the iron.


    Bill Nelson


    B
  11. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Messages:
    2,448
    Likes Received:
    148
    can be made to work with comercial switches!!

    I realized all of the photos in this thread were of hand laid switches.

    I started out using this style ground throw with hand laid switches. When I got to the narrow gauge on my upper deck, much of it at the very edge of possible reach, I used commercial track, as while it would have been possible to hand lay the track, maintaining it would be a bear. so I did it the easy way.


    I wanted to use this style ground throw , as they had proved themselves bullet proof, requiring very little repair or maintenance.

    The solution was to get brass square telescoping tubing where one size would slide in the other. I cut the smaller cross section brass square tube longer than the wider one , so it sticks out at one end, I file lightly on each side, so it slides smoothly through the larger tube, and I cut the top off of the far side of the larger brass tube.

    I drill a hole into the smaller brass tube @ one end and solder a brass pin into the hole. I then stick the other end of the smaller tube into the larger tube with the pin orented to the top, so that it sticks up theough the spot where the top of the larger tube was removed. That whole assembly is put in a slot in the roadbed, just under where the throw rod goes. the brass rod sticks up through one of the holes in the throw rod, and is trimed off sticking out just a tiny bit, after the switch is fastened to the roadbed.

    In one of these photos you can see how I used a longer tube to contoll a switch behind a siding, so I wouldnt have to reach across two tracks at the far edge of the shelf to throw the switch.

    If any of ths is not clear, just ask, and I'll get you even more confusilated.


    Bill Nelson

    Attached Files: