Track Plans/Photos: Sacramento Northern belt line

Discussion in 'Track Planning' started by jetrock, Jan 10, 2007.

  1. jetrock

    jetrock Member

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    Here are some shots of my SN belt line in its new home, plus a few shots with planned track layout crudely tacked on. I still need to get some CAD software that can handle PECO switches properly (which means Atlas' freeware is out) before I can draw up some more official plans: most of my hand-drawn plans are more of the "back of bar napkin" quality.



    The room is 24x11 feet, era is 1940s-60s, curve minimum radius is 12", 15" on the mainline. Scale is HO.

    Here's a shot of the room from the front door. Things probably are a little cockeyed.

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    Panoramic view of Haggin Yard module, 6'x1' with four tracks. RIP track in upper right, caboose track in lower left, escape track between first and second track.

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    Panoramic view of industrial area, 3'x6' L-shaped, with four on-line industries (total capacity 6 cars) and three-track freight yard and locomotive parking area (not much servicing is done here, other than fueling and crew changes.)

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    Panoramic view of the Libby McNeil Libby module, 1'x3'4". Two tracks holding maximum 5 or 6 cars serve a large fruit & vegetable packing plant.

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    Shot of planned expansion of Haggin Yard. This will make the yard double-ended, with mainline curving to the left to continue around the room. Track to the right is interchange track with Western Pacific, whose yard was adjacent to Haggin.

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    Shot of Alhambra & X, a bit to the right of the Libby module. This section begins a double-tracked section. The track in the foreground is another Western Pacific interchange track, to be used by reefers being iced and locomotives needing servicing at WP's south Sacramento facility as well as interchange traffic. The track in the background is the connection to Central California Traction: eventually this will punch through the wall to hidden storage track representing CCT and points south of Sacramento on the other side of the wall.

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  2. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    Are you modeling the Sacramento Northern somewhere back East, or did you actually find the ultra rare California house with a basement?
  3. liven_letdie

    liven_letdie Member

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    For California model railroaders I think you have to build a second story on any existing house and then you get an instabasement :D Kinda like what they did with the capitol yeah thats it :thumb:
  4. jetrock

    jetrock Member

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    Russ Bellinis: Actually, I live in Sacramento. Due to the fact that we are one of the oldest cities in California, downtown Sacramento has a lot of older houses with basements. My house in particular is what is known as a "high-water bungalow," the ground floor is about seven feet off the ground. The basement is actually only about a foot deep, the rest of the basement is above ground but below the floor of the house. This is nice because it means that generally it's not damp.

    Of course, the term "high-water bungalow" came from the fact that Sacramento used to flood a lot, and the raised floor was intended to keep it above water level when the house was built in 1907. Supposedly the only other place where you find a lot of this style of house is in New Orleans, although sadly a lot of those didn't survive Katrina.

    A lot of older structures along the waterfront were buried up to the second story (aside from the ones that could be jacked up) in the 1870s when they raised the street levels to limit flooding. That was a bit west from where I live, though, and about 30-40 years before my house was built!