Track laying

Discussion in 'FAQs' started by Woodie, Sep 6, 2004.

  1. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

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    Guys,

    To the eye? It looks perfectly straight, flat and no ................. bumps. I used a level and long steel ruler to ensure it was straight and flat and it's on roadbed, and flat chipboard base with a solid support. But look what telephoto will do to it!! (Just forget the photo quality. Not enough light to get a good depth of field using a high F stop.)

    AAAAAAARRRRRGHHH!!!!!! Should I be fired as Chieft Tracklayer of the Garahbara Railroad Co??? :eek:

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  2. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

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    And here it is not so zoomed in, but still zoomed. (and still wonky lookin' track) Again, forget the pic quality, but the concept is there. That's what I'm after, really, is that long, straight, dusty, desert heat haze look for Garahbara. But that track work is a bit wonky!!! hmmm...... I ain't glued it down yet, just track pins. And it took me hours to get it that level and straight!! Is straight level track a no-no??? :eek:

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  3. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

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    ..... and just to show that I'm not a rotten picture taker......

    It don't look so bumpy, side on!! :thumb:

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  4. McFortner

    McFortner Member

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    I personally would not worry. Have you seen how the prototype looks? Wiggles, bumps, ridges, sways, and so forth. I'd say you captured the real thing quite well.
    Heck, maybe even better! :thumb:

    Michael
  5. rksstl

    rksstl Member

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    Looks good to me. I don't know if I've ever seen straight and level track in the real world. Heres an example got this from The Web Yard. Almost thought it was track I laid. :D

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  6. Gavin171

    Gavin171 New Member

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    Wonky donkey

    took these pick's on a glass coffee table with a cheap'o digi camera after seeing your pictures i tryed to get the right angle, the trains are HO and measure about 3ft in length if its not your camera lens that's at fault it may be moisture or heat to wood or track, like the others have said what looks more natural.

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  7. Fred_M

    Fred_M Guest

    Humps and dips like that (second pix) will cause random decoupling if you are using Kadee couples. Fred
  8. jon-monon

    jon-monon Active Member

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    How does the chipboard look if you lay a straight edge on it now? I'll bet it's to blame. It's very unstable. All those chips expand and contract in different directions. Blue foam is very temperature/humidity stable and not likely to do this. Track, cork roadbed, liquid nails and such are also stable. I have a portable with no gaps cut in the track that survives swings from Indiana's summer highs of around 100 F and 90% humidity to winters 0 F and near 0 humidity without a problem. If you can get the foam over there, I would start over :(
  9. sumpter250

    sumpter250 multiscale modelbuilder

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    Woodie,
    Looks like you have found the right tool for checking for level track! :D :D
    And to think......I was going to invest in a laser, and micrometer depth gauge! :eek: :eek: :D :D

    There are many telephoto shots, that show up the imperfections of prototype construction. If you're not having tracking, or coupler problems, you shouldn't have to make any serious changes to your roadbed.
    Pete
  10. TrainClown

    TrainClown Member

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    It seems a shame that you spent all that money on the new digs and then skimped on the benchwork. I, myself, would never use chip board. Awfull stuff. Nothing but problems no matter what you make out of it. I would say, pull it all up and get yourself some real plywood.

    Just my thoughts.

    TrainClown ;)
  11. Gavin171

    Gavin171 New Member

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    just a thought, tele photo and zoom will cause a concertina effect and really exaggerate imperfections even though it looks straight to the human eye. the proplem you will have is when adding liquid glues for anything chipboard will ballon up as it absorbs the moisture.
  12. davidstrains

    davidstrains Active Member

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    It might not be as bad as your camera is making it look. From here it seems to be a bump every place that you have inserted a track nail. You might try loosening each nail and check again with your level and camera. If the track nail is the problem then you cure that when you glue the track down and remove the nails. :) :)

    Show us the results :wave:
  13. kf4jqd

    kf4jqd Active Member

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    Hey Woody!

    Long time no talk! :( Not to worry. I have some of the same problems with my layout. Just think, you have the same problems as the real railroads. Some are worst because they wont or don't spend the time or money to fix the track! :(

    Andy
  14. farmer ron

    farmer ron Member

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    Woodie, for looks and appearance value I give you 100 percent looks like you have managed to model the real thing.. on the other side of the coin for good reliable model running sorry its a zero...I would recomend that you stop production now or you will have nothing but flustration later on..the stuff that you are using is very prone to moisture.. that material suckes up moisture right out of the air and when it does that it swells up in a very random patern, exactly what you have now, and it will only get worse.. I agree with train clown, get it pulled off the layout and get some good plywood..Ron..
  15. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Woodie, I agree with Trainclown and Ron - rip up that chipboard and replace with plywood before you proceed any further. I know it sounds like a major hassle, but it's a one-time hassle, whereas uneven track is forever.

    Val
  16. siderod

    siderod Member

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    I concur with the above....rip that crap up and get some plywood.....i use 1/2 inch G1S supported all around the edges. No middle support (on a 3x6 layout) and i got no problems!
  17. Tileguy

    Tileguy Member

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    Hi didly dee,a plywood bed for me :D

    Being a contractor(specifically a tile contractor) OSB Bites!!!Particle Board is Worse!!!
    Good ol fashioned AC plywood will make you look like a highly paid surveyor ;)

    Note-smooth side up.....:)