Tires made from "O" rings.

Discussion in 'Tips & Tricks' started by Dave Harris, Oct 18, 2008.

  1. Dave Harris

    Dave Harris Member

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    I was asked a while back how I made the tires in my service station from O rings. Perhaps this will help to explain it.
    It is actually simple, first I mount the O ring on a piece of brass tubing, held in a hemostat, then using a cut off disk, I flatten it out a bit. One flattened is shown next to the mounted O ring. Next I heat a piece of screen , I have a few different ones, but these were done on a piece of the Spatter screen I got for a buck at the dollar store. When the screen is red hot press & rotate a section of the "tire on it. It cools very rapidly so you have to do it in sections till you get all the way around. Not every time produces a tire , sometimes you ruin an o ring, of course with a little work these can become "blow outs" for the station scrap pile .
    I use a wire brush in my dremel to clean the burned rubber out of the screen every couple of sections.
    Thats about it , let me know if any of you have any luck with it.

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  2. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Dave,

    Thanks again for another great tip!

    Have you found any flat rubber washers that would be suitable? Just thinking that this may eliminate a step. Unfortunately, in practice, the smallest I have seen is for my garden hose... :rolleyes:

    Andrew
  3. Ralph

    Ralph Remember...it's for fun!

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    Dave that is fantastic! Great looking effect!
    Ralph
  4. Ralph

    Ralph Remember...it's for fun!

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    Dave that is fantastic! Great looking effect!
    Ralph
  5. Dave Harris

    Dave Harris Member

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    Thanks Charlie -- I'm sure you are hiding your light under a bushel as to your abilities.:goldcup

    I have replaced tires on some of the cars in the junkyard-- the few that have any!:twisted:
  6. Dave Harris

    Dave Harris Member

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    Thanks Ralph.
    What I'm really having a problem with for the junkyard is coming up with an easy method of making wheels, both with tires & bare rims. Stock looking rims that is, very few of the 1/64 cars have stock looking wheels & stock are what I need, not mags or spokes like street rods . Frankly , I'm about stumped for an EASY way , I am not wanting to have to produce them on my lathe, I need too many for that. Any ideas anyone?
  7. Mountain Man

    Mountain Man Active Member

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    Can you use on as a master for a mold and resin cast the rest?
  8. Dave Harris

    Dave Harris Member

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    I suppose I could, however I have never done any resin casting . I've read up on it just never invested the moneyfor the supplies.
  9. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Dave,

    Have you got a picture of what kind of rim(s) you are looking for?

    Andrew
  10. Dave Harris

    Dave Harris Member

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    Andrew , I just want to make something that looks like a plain old standard 15 or 16 inch steel rim like all cars have from the factory. Almost all models I have have fancy mag or some other type rim or if std rims they have hubcaps molded in . I want bare rims in some cases ,others with tires --no caps -- stuff like you would see in a junk yard.

    I have formualated some what of an Idea today( sure glad the boss doesn't know what goes on in my head while I driving their bus around all day!! :eek:)
    on how I may be able to do some. I'll give it a try & let everybody know how it works unless it doesn't ,then I'll probably not announce my screw up!!:cry::curse:
  11. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    I remember getting a pair of jeans or some other clothing that had a cardboard label "rivetted" to them. I think I ended up using the rivets for pulleys - maybe suitable for rims? They were "double-sided" i.e. not like pop rivets with the expanded back that is usually hidden inside whatever you just rivetted.

    Andrew
  12. Dave Harris

    Dave Harris Member

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    Wheels for O ring tires WIRE no less.

    Ok I finally found a way to make decent looking wheels for the junk yard cars. Some easy --some a bit harder --the Wire ones take a bit of time . As the pictures show , the wire wheels are much bigger than the others-- thats because they are for older cars that had 21 to 28 inch tires-- plus they would be a b&*&##H to build small!
    Here are some pics of the raw material & some finished , also the jig I made for the wire wheels. The "Raw" materials are 10/24 thin metal anchor nuts & 10/12 wire terminals, the nuts are perfect when cut to proper width, the terminal has to have the "lip" thinned a bit. Centers are disposable aluminum baking tins cut with a punch made from sharpened piece of brass tube , hubcaps too.
    Look close at one of the tires & you will see how I solved the problem of a realistic looking "flat" tire. Just grinding a flat spot on it won't look right- a real flat has the tire bulged out on the bottom. I found that grinding it flat then glueing on a piece of a rubber band, leaving a bit sticking out & dabbing some black paint on it works well.
    The wire wheels are not perfect , but its a junk yard!!

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