Terrestrial Voyager

Discussion in 'Science Fiction & Fantasy' started by gippolot, Jan 28, 2007.

  1. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Well I've finally got the first sail on, ... and things seem to be OK.

    The yardarm is glued to a gudgeon that rotates around the mast. The rigging from the yardarm to the mast is just for appearance.

    I glued the control lines to the sail. Gold tabs are yet to be glued over to hide the end of thread. As well as gold cones on the end of the yardarms. I won't be fitting upwardly curved spines as per the original illustration.

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    Below is a view of how I intend to tie off / control the sails. The dark green curved track would hold traveling cars that can be released and move to the opposite side when the ship tacks.

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    Andrew
  2. Mark_1984

    Mark_1984 Guest

    This model is just awesome - it looks fantastic !
  3. Lex

    Lex Dollmaker

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    I'll repeat Mark's point ^^
  4. TheWebdude

    TheWebdude Just a Member

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    :thumb::mrgreen:NICE!!:mrgreen::thumb:
  5. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Thanks, Lex, Mark & Rick.

    The main mast has been fitted with sails. The control lines from each sail is run down to the deck for tying off.

    [​IMG]

    When I initially set the positions for the standing rigging, I set it too far forward, so the outer control lines interfere with the standing rigging as they are are lead down to the deck.

    It isn't really easy to see to see in this photo, but the control line on the right is bent as it passes the rigging. It's not a great problem. Not really noticeable.

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    A view of the mainmast from astern.

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    View from the forward quarter.

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    Andrew
  6. jaffro

    jaffro Long term member

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    All I can say is WOW! this is looking more and more amazing each time I come back to this thread, and to think you started from just a single drawing....
    Rigging has always put me off doing older sailing ship models, but you've made it look so easy with impressive results... well done.
  7. Mauiman

    Mauiman Member

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    seen the so far construction.. It looks wonderful... Now if only the one who drew that portrait would be able to see such a thing. And that Ice ship also looks great... I think you should work on that one. This one looks like it is doing the portrait some major justice. Keep up this eye popping work and may you get some good ratings on this once you have it in the gallery.. I will rate it the highest rating possible.
  8. paperbeam

    paperbeam Member

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    Exquisite straightness in your rigging gippolot!:cool:

    I nominate your beautiful ship for picture of the year!

    :inw::inw::inw:​

    Terry

    Ping-Pong Ball Cannon and N/Z scale Old West paper models (free samples) at: paperbeam - virtual paper models
  9. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Thanks Jaffro, Mauiman, & Terry for the kind comments, must say I'm a bit embarrassed, (no cheques in the mail this time).

    As far as the rigging goes, what I did was really quite easy. But I had to give it a couple of coats of varnish to make sure I "glued" most of the rigging together. I took me a couple of coats.

    Another thread here on the Krakus http://forum.zealot.com/t153756/ leads to the page, Railing Construction which may be a better technique for the rigging. Using cyanoacrylate glue instead of varnish as I did. Though I am quite surprised how well the varnish holds the thread together.


    Here's a couple of photos with the tower, (as I call it), sitting in position. I'm pretty happy with how it is coming together.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Am hoping to get the foremast sails finished this weekend.

    Mauiman,
    I was asked to send a model to Rodney Matthews via an email from his manager. Well, I'll send him a photo when it's finished. Am hoping he would appreciate my interpretation. And as for the ice ship... I'd like to make it.

    Andrew
  10. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Well I've done a bit more work to the model. Still plan to finish it this year.

    The rudder shape has been changed again. New design is on the right

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    Here's the jib, foresails and yardarms prior to gluing.

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    The foresail is glued in position.

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    The corners of the sail that I want to attach rope to are now printed black. A dob of glue is put on the sail corner and is to glue the thread to.

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    With most of the rigging complete, I've yet to figure out how to the jib out as though it is full of wind. Might have to go with some heavy thread held rigid with glue to act as a brace.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Andrew
  11. Gixergs

    Gixergs Well-Known Member

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    As a huge fan of Rodney Mathews work I would like to add my praise for your work. I am sure that when Mr Mathews sees the pictures of your finished model he will feel very proud that his art has inspired your art
    Stunning work and a great tribute to Rodney Mathews.
  12. shiftdel

    shiftdel Member

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    FANTASTIC model, and excelent build!!

    I've been following thsi thread for so long, and it's good to see the model almost finished.

    Congratulations!!
  13. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Thanks for the appreciative comments Gixergs and Shiftdel. Have been in a new job for the last couple of months which has taken some of my spare time, but I still want to get this finished and put my files out on the net before the Xmas /New Year holidays are finished.

    While driving to work this morning, I was thinking that I should have posted a photo from above. So here it is.

    The sails can be set in any position, but I prefer ships with sails set, having the wind blowing from the side. (I'm guessing, as I've never sailed on a square rigger).

    [​IMG]

    This photo, though somewhat shaky, shows how I want the jib to be seen, as though it is full of breeze. Again, I doubt that in reality, this sail would actually fill with breeze, due to to "interference" from the foresails. But I'm not about to let reality stop a good story.:wave: This sail is quite difficult to shape so that it looks real. Here a glue bottle is holding it in position. I'll try some glued thread to see if that will hold it in position.

    [​IMG]

    I had made a couple of sketches of "roller skiffs" that could be stowed on deck to act as life boats, but as this project has already taken more than 12 months, I'll probably finish with the decks pretty much clean of anything.

    Andrew
  14. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    I found some wire to hold the clew of the jib out as though the wind was filling it by blowing from the side.

    The wire is sold for use in making fishing lures. Approximately 0.5mm dia' stainless braid, plastic coated. My company uses it for attaching identification tags, to valves, equipment, etc. This picture is a bit blurry, and I initially painted the wire black.

    Unfortunately, painting the wire made it appear as being much thicker than the cotton it was to represent.

    The end of the wire is easily, and, permanently bent to glue one end of it to the sail.

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    Not painting the wire was the best way I found to leave it looking as "real" as possible. Though I didn't try coating the cotton with glue or varnish.

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    The next item to be fitted was the stern lanterns. These are to be fitted on 1mm dia' copper wire bent to the correct radius.

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    I have now added some cutouts to the top stern forecastle to lay the copper wire in to be glued.

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    Here is a photo of the 'lower walkway' glued in place, as well as both lanterns.

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    [​IMG]

    Andrew
  15. jaffro

    jaffro Long term member

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    It's good to see this one coming along nicely still.

    I wouldn't let the time it's taking bother you too much, I prefer to take my time myself, sometimes I'll sit with a model for hours just deciding how to tackle each part without making a single cut.

    I also find the longer I look at a model and think about it, the more ideas I get to add extra detail and highlights i normally wouldn't consider until it was too late.

    Keep up the good work, it's going to be well worth the wait to see how it turns out. :thumb:
  16. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Yes Jaffro, you've pretty much nailed it there. :mrgreen:

    I have finally got around to fitting the rudder. This would have to be, at the very least, the sixth rudder I've made. Usually due to changes in shape, colour, paper thickness.

    The inner skin is from paper, and the outer ribs are from 1mm thick card.

    Once it was glued together, I drilled through the rudder for access for the pintles. With a bit of care, the glued card could be drilled, but I then put a bit of areldite over the end of the rudder to ensure the glued seam held.

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    Here is a photo of the parts prior to assembly. Again, the metal parts came from jewellery pieces.

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    And assembled.

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    Assembled on the hull. (Curious, no BÖC fans out there)

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    I'm quite pleased with the final result, though it is simplified when compared to the original illustration. The six prototypes were worth it.

    Andrew
  17. Gomidefilho

    Gomidefilho Member

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    Wonderful work!!!!! jawdrop Amazing!!!!
  18. edi

    edi Member

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    I´m very impressed, fantastic:thumb:
  19. dansls1

    dansls1 Member

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    You continue to impress with this work of art!
  20. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Thanks again for the comments. Always a great motivator.

    I've finally glued the figure head in place. My designed has since been changed so that the hull side extends to mate with the neck of the figure head, so the prow will look much cleaner than seen here.

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    Note, after seeing the effects Kooklik has produced with a bit of self education, I feel some weathering could really polish the figure head, sails, windows off. I'll put that on my "to do" list, sometime in the future.

    A new jig has been made for the rope ladders to enable the crew to climb to the lookout posts. As for the standing rigging, I dabbed some matt varnish over the thread, and again it appears to hold quite well when dried.

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    Here the threads are cut from the jig.

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    Now trimmed further, prior to fitting. An important point is to cut the ladder rungs off about 0.5mm-1mm from the main vertical ropes.

    1) Because it is easier not to cause any damage.

    2) So that the varnish on the joins stays to ensure a good hold.

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    The upper ladder fitted to the mainmast. I used 5 minute areldite to glue it in position.

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    Here is the lower ladder in position.

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    Andrew