Terrestrial Voyager

Discussion in 'Science Fiction & Fantasy' started by gippolot, Jan 28, 2007.

  1. Amazyah

    Amazyah Senior Member

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    Yeah! I second what Paul said!

    Truly awesome design and build!:cool:

    Russell
  2. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Gippolot, That Ice Yacht was extremely similar to what I saw on a documentary. The video clip was in color but I believe the Ice Yacht was either a re-construction or a restoration. You ship is awesome and to have the "O.K." from the original artists is just awesome. I do think your model falls into the work of art category. The 2d picture was a work of art, to bring it into 3d takes nothing away way and makes the dream tangible. It is a work of art and I would bet could fetch a fair sum of money if it was offered for sale as a finished work in the right circles. I surely hope I can get the plans when your done though it would probably be on the edge of what I can do in puting it together.
  3. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Ahh, but what would have Ginny said? But that would be a forum on its own! ( I was always a Ginny fan.) Thanks very much, and ditto Russell.

    Yes, the website described a modern day re-build named ROCKET, I could find it for you.. or you can google. Oh and I should mention Zathros, as per usual, the cheque is in the mail.

    Two years ago I went to Canada in the winter, but saw no Ice Yachting. Unfortunately I never made it to Ottawa or Montreal. Guess I should have gone to the States or Europe.

    Anyway, I re-made the figure head, and here is a photo to show that it is to scale of my "typical figure". The yellow bits are supposed to be windows,... "well that is obvious" as I'm sure you would say.

    [​IMG]

    here is a photo where I drilled th holes to support the "chainplates", I was a dingy sailor.? for the rigging. I drilled the holes with a very fine drill, sized to suit. I think jewllers call it a "pin drill", but I'm not sure. Please correct me.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I bought the "chainplates" from a local Spotlight store , for Australians, or any jewlery supplies store for anyone OS. They are the bits of steel that women put through their ears to make themselves look flash. I don't know why, but flashy earings work for me!

    [​IMG]

    Andrew
  4. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    I've spent a bit of time deciding what I really want to do with the masts and rigging. And how to control the sails. I had to review how ships such as the Victory were setup. Some mistakes were picked up in my model again, but these have been rectified for the final plans. The mid lookout/crows nest, have been increased in size slightly, to make it easier to add the rigging.

    [​IMG]

    I'm going to put a batten into each sail to give the sail some rigidity and controllability. This will negate some sort of use of miles of extra rope and spars to control a sail shape that is quite impracticable.

    This would probably the greatest deviation from the original illustration upon which this project is based.

    I've always attempted to make this model have a certain dimensional and real functionality about it, so that is why it has taken me so much time to get the aesthetics versus the "build" quite correct.

    [​IMG]

    Andrew

    (as always, don't be surprised if I change everything in the next post)
  5. dansls1

    dansls1 Member

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    This model is certainly a work of art - thanks for sharing the design and build process with us ;)
  6. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Thanks Dansls1,

    Following up something you mentioned earlier regarding an element of reality/practicability with a model.

    The split sails, and method of control have always concerned me. As an ex dingy sailor, nothing irritates me more than totally impracticable sail settings. Which is true for probably 95% of square rigged sailing models seen anywhere. But if you're a non sailor, then it doesn't matter as it looks right.

    I have.. well maybe I should say, I've convinced myself that this set up could work. Use a few well placed ropes, (sheets or whatever you want to call them), could conceivably control the sail shape, providing, that the sail is battened to make it rigid and stop the air spilling out the edges. If you can follow the drawing.

    As for the split sail, well, it looks right so I'll leave it at that.


    [​IMG]


    Andrew
  7. jleslie48

    jleslie48 Member

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    that split sail would be really hard to sail. a simpler solution would be if the bottom was connected with rigging to each other instead of/in addition to those cross tiedowns. The only reason you would want that huge hole in your sail is that the wind would have to be totally overwhelming and you wanted a permanent reef on your sail,
  8. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Good suggestion. Strangely, I hadn't actually thought of that.

    Early on I had toyed with joining the two halves instead, as in this format.

    [​IMG]

    But my gut feeling is that the split will look better, (if, as you mentioned, in our reality quite useless) ... But I could be wrong.

    FYI, if you have ever see some photos of those huge J/K class or Americas Cup yachts from the early 20th century, they tried a series of holes up the middle of the spinnaker. The idea didn't catch on.

    Anyhoo, this is the front view of the mainmast main sail.

    [​IMG]

    I've yet to fit the yardarms or battens.

    Here is a photo of some parts for the spanker, (yep, that is what Nelson would have called it).

    [​IMG]

    As I've posted previously, I'll put this up on a website for free download. Is that what you mean?

    The plans are at least 90% complete in PDF format. I just keep changing parts. Such as the rudder colours are now different, and the rudder ribs are slightly larger so as not to be quite so fragile when cutting. It isn't all that difficult. But a bit of care and a new blade will make the difference.

    The hull only requires 5 pieces to cover. Extra frames have been added after my current model to make it easier to mold the outer covering to the frame. And the rigging WILL NOT be anywhere near as complex as the Victory. But it will look good enough. I'm a big fan of Millhistory's attitude, ..ships look great, but rigging is a pest.

    Andrew
  9. jleslie48

    jleslie48 Member

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    I think I would release it without the hole (as one continuous sail ) so that those who want a "real" sailing ship can make the more traditional sail. I would then put a note on the model that the middle panel should be removed for modellers who are more concerned on making the sail appear like it does in the image. Its not that big a deal to cut out that one panel of the sail, but to add it in when its not there is tougher.

    Personally I think I'll remove the panel and then string the two sail sections together for the support that is needed. Ironically looking at your split topsail and topgallant sails, they are anchored just as I want to anchor the course sail. You have them anchored to the spars.
  10. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Point noted. I'll do that. Also, every item that is too large to fit onto an A4 page, is cut to fit,... and,.. is also put onto an enlarged page for anyone who wants to cut an oversize page to print on. A cut down A3 won't be long enough though. The largest oversize pages used are mostly 500mm x 200mm.

    I used cut down A1 pages I nicked from work to print the longer items on.

    I've redesigned the rudder, and changed the colours. It is less flimsy to cut, but still looks "delicate". The rudder "webbing" is printed on both sides of the page.

    [​IMG]

    And assembled. The rudder gudgeons are cut to fit, and the part that extends out of the hull is covered with coloured paper.

    [​IMG]


    The mid lookout post/crows nest, has undergone a major re-design. Once I really looked at fitting rigging, I realized that my initial design wouldn't work.

    [​IMG]

    More to come.

    Andrew
  11. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Had to buy a couple of drills to drill the card for the middle lookout. I'm using wooden dowel for the masts, and will cover them with thin coloured paper.

    [​IMG]

    This is a view with the parts sitting in position to determine if my redesign will work. It should come together OK.

    [​IMG]

    Heres are the rudder gudgeons fitted into the transom.

    [​IMG]

    This a photo with the rudder sitting in position. I won't attach it until the hull is complete.

    [​IMG]

    I'm pretty happy with the rudder changes and will leave it as is. ... Oh yes, the rudder would be totally useless,...but it looks good. :thumb: Not unlike my theory for architecture, if it isn't clever and useful, it has to look spectacular.

    Andrew
  12. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    This is a comparison of the change I've had to make for the middle lookout post.

    This is due to the fact that I hadn't really thought about many details until I came to make a particular part.

    The mast is now from two different diameter pieces, and the rigging for the topmast is much more user friendly. The original mast concept was quite impractical, so I couldn't leave it at that.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I bent and curved the spanker before I glued the ribs to it. Unfortunately this photo doesn't really show this accurately. But it does look much better than a flat sail.

    [​IMG]

    Here is the final result.

    [​IMG]

    Andrew
  13. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    I've been messing around with an idea to make the rigging for the masts.

    From what I've seen in other threads, modelers set up a rigging template, but still tie individual knots at every thread crossing. I am really, really keen to avoid this amount of effort. so,..

    This is a template I made for the rigging. A print of the position for the threads was first laid down. The 1mm thick card has slits at 3mm intervals for the horizontal threads, and is glued to the chipboard base. This is to hold the horizontal cross threads in place. The vertical threads are simply wound around nails and tied off.

    [​IMG]

    Here I've started putting black thread thought the template.

    [​IMG]

    Initially I put drops of glue along the extreme edges to hold the thread in place. This ended up a bit of a mess. I thought it would, but, if I didn't have a go, I'd never never know.

    Then I tried to brush varnish over the whole setup. After it dried, I cut the rigging from the template. Here it is.

    [​IMG]

    And a closer view.

    [​IMG]

    The varnished thread seems to have "glued" quite well. I'll give it a day and the give it a "stress" test. If it passes this, I'll try just varnishing the thread together without any glue.

    Andrew
  14. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    The standing rigging seems to be stable enough when cut away from the jig. The varnish holds the cotton in position quite well yet is still very pliable. A thinner cotton has been used this time.

    [​IMG]

    The lower section of the main mast has been assembled and is shown here sitting in position. I have now basically decided on the final construction for the masts, rigging and sails.

    [​IMG]


    You can use this link to view an enlarged close up photo.

    http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t247/q_s_charm/Terrestrial Voyager Card Model/32-03LARGE.png

    Back to work.

    Andrew
  15. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Still getting there.

    I've put the masts and most of the standing rigging in place. You'll have to put up with the low quality photos, the photos I take in daylight are much better than those taken at night.

    Here is part of the upper rigging, prior to trimming loose ends.

    [​IMG]

    The upper portion of the rigging is glued to the mast, and then a paper band is wrapped around the mast and rigging. Loose ends yet to be cut.

    [​IMG]

    I re-made the standing rigging with a much thinner cotton for the rigging. It still seems to hold together well, even though it is only held together with varnish. I had to touch up some parts with a second coat though.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    More to follow.

    Andrew
  16. rockpaperscissor

    rockpaperscissor Member

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    The rigging looks fantastic. Your model is one of the most amazing card models I have ever seen. Congratulations!
  17. paulhbell

    paulhbell Guest

    The more I see, the more I'm impressed. Amazing jog on the Rigging. Rigging has got to be one of the hardest jobs in modeling and you have made a good clean job of it.
  18. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    Thanks Rocks & Paul for the very kind comments,

    The rigging has turned out to be quite stable, surprising as it is only held by varnish. Please note, if it was true to scale, I would have doubled the number of horizontal ropes, ... but I am just not that keen to remake the rigging for a third time.

    I put the symbols that are on the mainsail. onto the masthead flag.

    [​IMG]

    The flag is from two pieces glued together, (for colour on both sides), which makes it easy to bend into a dynamic shape.

    [​IMG]

    Here is a view to date. The flag is yet to be bent to shape to show it as flying in the wind, (the top lookout hasn't yet been glued in position).

    Rigging to actually get to the top & bottom lookout posts has yet to be placed.

    [​IMG]

    Am starting to take short cuts now as I must get this project finished very soon.

    Yes, it has turned out much better than I initially imagined. But I have at least another 10 projects I want to start. To much time is going into this.

    Andrew
  19. afcgooners

    afcgooners New Member

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    It is gonna look so cool when its finally finished!!!
  20. gippolot

    gippolot Member

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    I've put the cannon barrels in place. Just painted, cut off, toothpicks - nothing flash.

    This is the starboard side, similar to the original illustration, with only a few cannons protruding.

    [​IMG]

    On the port side I have all the cannons showing.

    [​IMG]

    As you can see from the two photos above, the standing rigging isn't quite as taught as I'd hoped.
    I'm deciding whether I should cut and re-glue the top end of the rigging. Or put a couple of chocks between the top of the rigging and the mast - but still have it looking authentic.

    Here is a photo of a sail and yardarm prior to gluing. The creases and curves have to be put into the sail before gluing though.

    [​IMG]


    Andrew