Steam Engine Weathering

Discussion in 'Weathering Forum' started by 2-8-2, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. 2-8-2

    2-8-2 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    0
    Anyone have pics and/or tips on weathering steam engines? I'm ready to bite the bullet and get started!

    :thumb:
  2. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    Work from prototype pictures, if possible, and pay attention to the era which you're modelling. Some roads kept things in good shape, appearance-wise, while others let 'em go, especially near the end.
    Here's a loco that I painted for my good friend cn nutbar. This was quite a few years ago, and he was quite happy with it.
    [​IMG]

    Here's the same loco, recently repainted to reflect a more well-cared-for appearance. It goes to show you that tastes can change. I like it better too, and I've got a couple more due for the same treatment, also mister nutbar's.
    [​IMG]

    Here's another: I don't have a "before" picture of this one, but it was fairly heavily weathered too. This one also got renumbered.
    [​IMG]

    Here are a couple of my own:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Start the weathering when you do the initial painting. I use a minimum of four shades of "black" on any steamer: a different one each for the running gear, smokebox and firebox, boiler, and cab and tender. Also, vary the finishes, as appropriate: some areas glossy, some semi-gloss, and others flat.
    When you apply the weathering, use light applications of heavily-thinned paints. It's easy to add layers 'til you're satisfied, but it's a lot harder to remove them.

    Wayne
  3. 2-8-2

    2-8-2 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks, Wayne! I was hoping to hear from you in this thread, as I've long admired the work you do on your steam engines.

    As for my own, I will probably be giving my 2-6-6-2 a heavier dose of weathering since it will be doing most of its work at the coal mines. Once I get some sealer for my custom made decals I intend to print, I'll start weathering my engines.
  4. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    It didn't take very long for a steam engine to get dirty, and I'm sure that a loco in mine service would dirty even faster. Since I model the '30's, my LPBs provide lots of cheap labour, and the railroad employs them as engine wipers and painters.:D

    Wayne
  5. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2003
    Messages:
    3,877
    Likes Received:
    0
  6. 2-8-2

    2-8-2 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    0
    Another great pic!

    There's just something about steam engines that modern era engines can't even come close to. I don't know what it is, but they're WAY cooler!
  7. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    Very nice weathering job on your Big Boy, Bob. (How's that for alliteration and a great place to eat, too?). I watched a video just last night that showed a couple of these, "near the end", and your weathering is dead on.:thumb: :thumb:

    Wayne
  8. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree, unless the stoker quits and you're the shovel technician. sign1

    Wayne
  9. 2-8-2

    2-8-2 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    0
    I gotta tell ya, Wayne, that 2-8-2 in the first pic is simply amazing. I like any kind of steam engine, but those are (obviously) my favorite. Can you post some more info about it? It looks like there was some custom work done on it.
  10. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    The Mikado in the first two pictures belongs to my good friend cn nutbar. The model is a brass import, to which I added the Elesco fwh system, and a few other minor details.

    Wayne
  11. 2-8-2

    2-8-2 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    0
    I assume the Elesco FWH is from Cal Scale? I checked their products, and it seems they only offer kits for HO scale. Do you know of anyone who sells steam detail parts for N scale?

    That engine is fabulous! :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:
  12. Fluesheet

    Fluesheet Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2006
    Messages:
    368
    Likes Received:
    0
    Try Precision Scale Co. for steam detail parts as well (http://www.precisionscaleco.com/). They have an N scale catalog, though I don't know how complete a selection they provide. Their HO selection is very nice.
  13. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    That's correct. Precision Scale also offers a lot of steam loco detail parts and the Bowser catalogue shows a wide range of Cal Scale parts not listed in Walthers catalogue. Cary (another Bowser affiliate) also offers a large Elesco bundle, in two different styles. I'm using one on a CNR T-3a 2-10-2 that I'm building for mister nutbar.
    For N scale details, you could check Walthers N scale catalogue, or try Google for some other ideas.

    Wayne