Some trackside structures...

Discussion in 'Trackside Photos & Details' started by doctorwayne, Jan 21, 2007.

  1. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    Wayne,
    You keep me impressed as to the amount you have done here. How do you get so much done, are you retired or do you work on these as part of your job. I don't find the time to do a weathering let alone time to model all these buildings. I do hope as I go I get a little fasted. I know that as I get started I find my work area coming together and that will help me move faster. I keep finding tools to help and being so new I need to get settled into a groove then I’ll get more productive.
    I do find your work impressive and hope you keep us informed of your work.
    rbDHD
  2. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Thanks, Dave. Although I am retired, I've probably done less model railroading and model building than when I was still working. :rolleyes: There have been a few large, full-scale projects that took up considerable time, and I seem to be spending more time on the Forums than working on trains, too. Right now I'm mired in a bunch of loco rebuilds, but when they're out of the way, I hope to get back to work on the layout.
    Small structures like the handcar sheds are good projects for first time scratchbuilders, and it's pretty quick and easy to do multiples, all built to the same plan. I usually just make a quick sketch to get the proportions to look right, add the key dimensions, then start building. Using sheet and strip styrene, you can build almost as fast as you can cut out the parts, and a well-developed "scrap" bin can save a lot of money and/or time over buying or building doors and windows. I used the same mass production techniques for the coal and ice dealers' buildings HERE and HERE .

    Wayne
  3. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    I understand how the forums take so much time as here I am too. I would love to see any photos you have to share on the large projects. I also may need to ask you about rebuilding locos. I purchased one on eBay and its not in the best running condition and I know I will need to rehab the loco but I don't know where to start. That's all for a different post. Do you mind I ask what you did before your full time retirement job?
    rbDHD
  4. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Before becoming a full-time model railroader, I worked at a steel plant. Shift work afforded lots of opportunities for railfanning, model building, or just doing those jobs around the house that most people waste their weekends on. :rolleyes::p:-D:-D Of course, most of the time I was working weekends too! ;)
    If you want to see some more photos, here's a link to a Thread that contains a lot of links to other Threads, all with photos. Some are only a picture or two, some tell a story, and some are just lots of photos. I hope that you'll find something of interest. A fresh update...

    Wayne
  5. McGilliCutty

    McGilliCutty New Member

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    How much does a typical hand car weigh? When it's time to move them out on line, can it be done by one man or does it take a couple to muscle it out, flip it around and line it up?
  6. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Hi McGilliCutty, and :welcome1: to the Gauge.

    To tell you the truth, I didn't know, so I googled it and came up with this: Railroad Handcar . Another site gives the weight as between 700 and 900 lbs., although I always thought that they had pull-out extensions that the operator(s) used when taking them on or off the tracks. The extra length gave more leverage, making lifting easier. I'd guess that one man could move it onto or off the tracks, although on my layout, it would probably kill one man trying to pump it up a hill by himself. If it didn't, coming down the other side would. :eek::eek: :p ;):-D

    Wayne
  7. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    Nice, Nice, Nice!!!!! Have you modeled a steel mill yet? I was thinking of doing a rolling mill but wow I need some room for that and finding the blueprints for it will cost some $$$ :cry: and I've not given up on finding a less expensive copy of blueprints. I would like to one day do an entire mill as I recall then from when I was a child and would think it would be a great model to build. Till I move into a new home :eek: and see what kind of space I'll have for a layout I need to keep my eyes on the weathering and kitbashing education path I'm on now. :mrgreen:
    rbDHD
    rbDHD
  8. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Actually, I did start to build a blast furnace, but I ran out of both space and money. The company gave me copies of the major blueprints, and I got most of the cast house built, along with the furnace shell, and skip bridge. I offered to donate the model to the company for display, in return for the money to finish it, but other complications intervened. Most of it was scrapped or given away, with this crane being one of the few remaining remnants.
    [​IMG]

    It was originally started as one of the two casthouse cranes, but I modified it using a couple of cranes in my department as examples, as it was easy to get on them to study the details. Construction is sheet styrene, with basswood shapes representing the structural shapes, including most of the handrails. A few of the broken handrails were replaced with plastic parts, but other than the wheels and the bearing blocks (salvaged from a 1/32" Russian tank model), everything was scratchbuilt. The crane runway in the photo was built for this scene, using styrene structural shapes. If these had been available when I started work on the furnace, I probably would've be more inclined to keep the project, for finishing at a later date. I like working with wood, but not for modelling projects. The blueprints, incidentally, are gone.
    The problem with most steel mill models is that they take up so much room if done to scale, and if they're compressed too much, they become caricatures. The mill in which I worked was about half a mile long, or roughly 30' in HO. :eek:

    Wayne