Soda Can Miscellaneous projects completed

Discussion in 'CAN MODELS (Both aluminium and Tin)' started by gman_93643, Feb 8, 2018.

  1. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    Now keep in mind that there are tons of videos on YouTube that claim to show a similar process, yet none of them appear to account for actually building with the cans afterwards. My process is from start to finish, meant to be a process used exclusively for building with cans, but it must be followed as precisely as possible in order to achieve the best results. So without much pomp or circumstance, let us begin and then I will take questions afterwards.

    First, shell your cans by cutting off the top and bottom as well as an 8th of an inch on each end to remove any jagged edges. When finished your choice of cans should look as shown below. Also, when choosing a can, opt for a can that appears to have a thinner, more flexible wall. I say this because during initial trials, I noticed that RC Cola cans were much better suited for this process than the standard Coca Cola cans due to the fact that they were more flexible and appeared at least to touch to have a slightly thinner can wall. This tutorial will show the process with the Coke cans, although I ultimately built the P-51 out of RC Cola. In short, generic brands may be better suited for this process than name brand soft drinks.

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    Next, you will need a standard Pressure Cooker. Fill the cooker with about a half cup to a cup of water as shown in the photo so that the bottom surface is barely covered with water.

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    Now place your shelled cans into the cooker. The point of shelling prior to 'cooking' them now becomes apparent since we can now fill the cooker to capacity. Utilizing this method, I was able to do a full dozen cans at a time and you should be able to do the same, depending on the size of your pressure cooker. Other YouTube tutorials do not appear to touch on this, probably due in part to the fact that they are not building with the cans immediately afterwards. By deciding to shell prior to cooking, you can produce upwards of 36 cans in an hour as opposed to a far smaller amount in the same time. This would be highly inefficient especially if your project requires several dozen cans.


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    Next comes the easy part, set the cooking timer to 20(TWENTY) minutes and wait! My pressure cooker came with a preset timer for chicken which was 15 minutes. I chose that option, then added 5 minutes.

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    Now once the timer goes off and you have removed the pressure, take your cans out and pat them dry ONLY. At this point you will need NON-ACETONE nail polish remover and cotton round remover pads. DO NOT, and I repeat DO NOT use acetone based nail polish remover if you intend to build with the cans. During initial trials with this process, the acetone based polish remover left a white film over the surface of the can that was difficult to remove and it also rendered some of the cans nonuseable due to the fact that they would not adhere to the glue. If you do not have NON-ACETONE based polish remover, stop here until you can obtain some.

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    Now, lay your cans on a flat surface, such as cardboard or a catalog over your normal surface since you will be making a large mess, and simply begin removing the logos and paint. Dab the polish remover generously on to the cotton rounds and start removing like you were polishing a shoe. If you have treated the cans properly with the proper amount of time in the pressure cooker, the paint should come off rather easily.

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    Next, take your cans to the sink and wash them with dish soap and warm water to remove any excess nail polish remover, paint residue, etc. This is critical, as failing to remove any of the polish remover or resulting paint residue within a timely manner will prevent your cans from adhering with your choice of adhesive. Once you have washed the cans, you can either set them out to air dry, or you can wipe them off paper towels. Your bare cans should now look as shown below:

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    Any questions?
    Last edited: May 27, 2018
    Revell-Fan, Rhaven Blaack and zathros like this.
  2. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    Excellent information and re-purposing. :)
  3. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    So the experimentation continues to see what the potential is for this particular facet of can construction and crafting. As some of you have already pointed out, there are a number of iconic aircraft sporting that classic bare aircraft aluminum look that would benefit from this technique. Off the top of my head, many of the Century series fighters come to mind.

    At any rate, my next model, was one of my favorite and an aircraft I actually sat in on numerous occasions, The F-15 Eagle. I was curious to see what this aircraft would look like built from the gradually improved techniques of stripping the paint and logos off of the cans. I'll let those of you following this thread, judge for yourself...

    As you can see the technique is getting more familiar to me. Paint was easily removed and the cans did not appear to be any more difficult to build with than when they still had the paint and logos on them...

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    Revell-Fan, zathros and Rhaven Blaack like this.
  4. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    Wow, I know you guys like the soda can original graphics, but these bare aluminum models are outstanding!!!!
  5. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    They do Kinda grow on you don't they?

    I'm thinking of doing an AT-6 Texan next. :)
  6. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    That or a B-58 Hustler!!

    B-58 Hustler.jpg
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  7. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    That would work too! :)thumbsup
  8. subnuke

    subnuke Moderator Intelligence Extraordinaire Moderator

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    That Hustler picture tugs at me just like some of those other pics you post. Man, what a plane. I was just thinking this morning I need a model of that plane on my shelf.
  9. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    Such wonderful input, suggestions, etc. Experimentation with this new technique must continue, and....

    I think I'm going here thumbsup

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  10. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    You can't miss with that one!! Good reference photos here, please, add the air brakes! :)


    Link = https://www.airplanesofthepast.com/f86-sabre.htm
  11. Gandolf50

    Gandolf50 Researcher of obscure between war vehicles... Moderator

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    Here is my vote ... I love this pix ..from my Father-in-law, Johnny (RIP).
    SNJ-5 (91069) North American "Texan" Edenton, N.C. c.1945-46. Tower in background. Most I've seen are painted so it's kind of neat to see a bare-metal schemed one.
    SNJ5-Texan.jpg

    and just because there is a family history involved.. and I love cool stuff, and history and family stories..
    VoughtXF5U.jpg
    At first I thought it was a mock-up of a concept..but did some digging around and found out this was real !
    The "Flying Pancake" was designed by Charles H. Zimmerman in 1942 and was an experimental plane built to be a proof of concept for vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) as part of the Vought XF5U "Flying Flapjack" World War II U.S. Navy fighter aircraft program. This also explains the reports of UFO sightings over New York in the 40's !!

    Voight-173.jpg

    Another shot of V-173 Hanger 1 at Floyd Bennett_NY 1940's The Pancake made more than 190 flights and accumulated 131 hours of flight time (with Charles Lindbergh taking it for at least one flight) read more>
    https://www.airspacemag.com/history-of-flight/restoration-vought-v-173-7990846/#ixzz3ND9LsHSg

    Thanks for the original pix Johnny!
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018
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  12. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    The bare metal Texan is most definitely coming after the F-86 Sabre!

    Perhaps it will find a home? :)
  13. Revell-Fan

    Revell-Fan Co-Administrator Administrator Moderator

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    AWESOME!!! You might think it was wielded from steel. :Bravo::Bravo::Bravo:
  14. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    The F-86 Sabre is complete. For this model, I wanted to test a more complex technique and so for this build I opted to build utilizing bulkhead construction to thus reproduce a more accurate model. Since I'm going for that bare aircraft aluminum look, I used some colored pieces of can to reproduce the USAF on the one wing and the insignia on the other to help break up the monotony of bare metal. I didn't want to over do it with too many markings and thus take away from the finished model. In my opinion, this build was a stunning success like the previous attempts and with each new model, I am learning the techniques and characteristics of the cans after removing the paint.

    And if you look closely, she even has air brakes in honor of Zathros' humble request. They aren't deployed, but if you look carefully, you can see them stowed towards the tail end of the fuselage! :)

    Here she is!

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    Now on to the Texan...thumbsup
  15. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator Moderator

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    That looks FANTASTIC!!!
  16. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    A couple of large ones:

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  17. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    Geeze, did you even breathe in between posts!! That was a real fast build, with speed brakes too, it looks great!! :)
  18. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    It wasn't that fast, was it?! Well maybe...I was just anxious to see how the F-86 Sabre would turn out with the non painted cans. I've seen some of these built inverted and they don't look nearly as good as this one does with the bare aluminum, IMO...;)
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  19. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    I agree. There are certain aircraft that just beg to be done shiny side out, and they are made of aluminum, you have a win win combination. :)
    Gandolf50 likes this.