Soda Can Grumman Hellcat 1:36th scale using FG pattern tutorial

Discussion in 'CAN MODELS (Both aluminium and Tin)' started by gman_93643, Dec 5, 2017.

  1. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    In this next tutorial, I will demonstrate how to take a basic Fiddler's Green paper model pattern, convert it for use for building with cans and then take you step by step through some of the new techniques I utilize when building can models. As previously stated, the potential for detailing these models is pretty wide open. The Canopy can(and should) be built with clear vinyl and unit markings as well as insignias can be cut out of the appropriate color of can in order to really make these models pop. Landing gear can be designed and built a number of ways an can also enhance the model. As we will see as we progress through the build, these patterns are not perfect, but you can work through them to produce a little gem of a model.

    The end result of this can be a nice little model such as this one, completed only a few days ago:

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    As you can see from the photos, we will be utilizing techniques such as rolling the wings and control surfaces as well as creating a spiffy looking clear canopy and some tough landing gear utilizing some basic and clever techniques. Also, with can building there is no need for decals, you can simply cut out and create your own further adding to the beauty of the model...

    Next post, we begin with the pattern and get to work...
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2017
  2. Revell-Fan

    Revell-Fan Co-Administrator Administrator Moderator

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    That's awesome!!! :)
  3. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    Very nice!! I love aircraft models, this is right up my alley. ;)
  4. Gandolf50

    Gandolf50 Researcher of obscure between war vehicles... Moderator

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    OOOhhh!!! Nice! I already have my Orange Crush cans ready for my T28 Trojan, from my days in the Navy -Barbers Pt. Naval Air Station, Hawaii. I'll find my old picture...from me in the jockeys seat!
    Trojan and Mustang.JPG
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  5. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    When I begin with these patterns, the first thing I do is scale them appropriately in my editing program, in this case, Foxit PDF Editor. As I do with most of these models, I prefer to scale these up to 1:48th or even 1:36th scale to really try to capture as much detail as possible within the model. In Foxit, I scale the X axis percentage to 146% and the Y axis to 145%:

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    Here, I have scaled up the wings to the preferred size for this build which will end up close to 1:36th scale. Now we scale the fuselage and the remaining parts from the FG pattern with the same dimensions across the X & Y axis:

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    And now we print out the the templates via Laser printer onto 110lb card stock so that we can cut it out and begin working on the model:

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    Now I have scaled the pattern up and made it slightly more can friendly by using the PDF editor program. In the next part of this tutorial, we will cut out all of the template pieces from card stock and begin building the the three wing sections to this model by using the rolled wing technique.

    More to come soon...
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
    Revell-Fan and zathros like this.
  6. Revell-Fan

    Revell-Fan Co-Administrator Administrator Moderator

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    A fellow member, Red, once used the same technique and built a Cylon Centurion costume from real sheet metal aluminium! :)
  7. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    There is a method to the madness for sure. :) I've used the same process to do some prop building myself when I built some realistic Ghostbuster's Proton Packs a few years back. Once you master the process, you can scale up or down at will...
  8. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    That's what I like about learning about this. The possibilities are endless.

    SOme cans have a plastic liner, is this removed? I have not checked on soda can or Beer cans, just wondering, is it metal to metal with the Crazy Glue: :)
  9. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    I have never removed anything from a can minus the small plastic balls that come in some beer cans. I've built with beer cans such as Bud, Coors Light, Tecate, Stella Artois, Medalla Light, Gameday light, Miller Light, as well as Busch and numerous energy drink cans such as Monster and Ace Energy drink and its just business as usual. Unless it falls out of the can when I shell it, it gets used in the construction. With a good Super Glue Gel, I just shell the cans and get to it! :)
  10. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    Does Super Glue bond the Aluminum itself together, or bare Aluminum, which is what I guess I am asking? Since cans are painted, very well, I might add, I wonder what the glue is sticking too? :)
  11. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    Depending on what kind you use, yes. Testors, Jet and Loctite Gel versions will easily bond even the painted can section to the non-painted. If you buy the cheap Crazy Glue brand from the 99 cent store or Dollartree, not so much. I have used Loctite for several years now and it bonds can to can, can to aluminum sheeting and can to foam without issue...
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  12. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    Thanks, I wanted to know what to get. :)
  13. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    Okay as promised, the first step for building this model is to make our three wing sections for our Hellcat. Using the FG pattern ,we have two main wing pieces and a center wing piece that will need to be slid through the fuselage at a later point in the build.

    We start by using the FG templates to cut out our two main wing pieces:

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    Using the templates aligned over our can pieces, we carefully roll our wings and then glue a strip of aluminum sheeting to the center of the upper wing surface as shown here:

    [​IMG]

    Now since we are using a FG pattern, which does not include spars or wing supports, we will simply create our own out of layers of Darice craft foam to build a solid, dent-proof airfoil. We start with a single layer of foam and decrease in width as we work our way four layers tall:

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    Once we have glued the varying pieces of Darice foam layered four pieces tall over the aluminum sheeting, we then carefully roll and glue our wing over the foam:


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    We seal the edges with strips of can cut .5 of an inch wide, then folded in half lengthwise. These are then glued over the trailing edge of the wing and can be paneled over later.

    We repeat the above steps to build our remaining main wing piece. Again we start by gluing a strip of aluminum sheeting to the upper wing surface and then glue four layers of Darice foam at decreasing widths until we are four layers tall over the sheeting:

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    Just like the previous wing, we then carefully roll our wing and glue it over the foam and seal the edges with strips of .5 inch of can strip folded in half lengthwise glued to the trailing edge. As previously stated, we can clean up the edges later during the main assembly. As you can see, we have two fairly accurate wing pieces, rolled into the classic airfoil shape:

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    We finally cover the ends of the wing pieces with appropriate cut strips of can so that our foam structured airfoil is not open ended:

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    We now have our two main wing pieces rolled and completed for now. In the next section of the tutorial, we will complete the center wing section and then move onto the main fuselage:

    [​IMG]

    More to come soon...
  14. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    Moving on to the center wing section of this model, the process is the same as our two main wing sections. We use the template to trace and cut out our wing center section as seen here:

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    Again we add our strip of aluminum sheeting to the top inside surface to give it some strength:

    [​IMG]

    The center wing piece is carefully rolled so that we do not crease it and cause the can to tear at the crease. And as we did before, we layer our Darice foam filler to create our robust, dent proof airfoil:

    [​IMG]

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    Once we have the staggered thickness of Darice foam layered over the top of the aluminum sheeting as shown, we once again roll the wing section over the foam after dabbing glue onto the foam and glue the airfoil in place. As we did previously, we seal the trailing edge of the can with .5 of an inch of blue can folded in half lengthwise. In this case, due to the unique shape of the trailing edge, we use three separate pieces to accomplish this. Again we will panel over this at a later stage in the construction:

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    Now that we have the three main wing sections rolled and completed, in the next part of the tutorial, we'll move on to the fuselage and the control surfaces at the rear of our model using many of the same techniques we have employed thus far in the build.

    More to come soon...
  15. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    What did you use to roll the pieces? I can think of a few things, but seeing how your work is so successful. ;)
  16. gman_93643

    gman_93643 New Member

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    Anything and everything from a 10 inch long wooden dowel to a golf putter works exceptionally well for rounding. I have also been known to use a pencil or even a highlighter for more complex parts...:)