Small but nice fishing boat...

Discussion in 'General Card Modeling' started by THE DC, Jul 20, 2017.

  1. THE DC

    THE DC Highly Esteemed Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2008
    Messages:
    633
    Likes Received:
    111
    Hey, after a bunch of broken threads I found this nice little kit at a working site; so I wanted to share in case someone else had hunted it and given up!!!

    Enjoy:


    https://cfp.muerell.de/products/9
    spaceagent-9 and zathros like this.
  2. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Messages:
    8,211
    Likes Received:
    3,952
    I've seen this before. It is a nice ship/fishing/cargo boat. Good of you to showcase it again. ;)
  3. THE DC

    THE DC Highly Esteemed Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2008
    Messages:
    633
    Likes Received:
    111
    Hope someone finds it worthwhile...
  4. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Messages:
    7,686
    Likes Received:
    2,637
    Thank you for sharing this with us!
    I have downloaded it. It looks like you could add some greebles to it as well.
  5. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Messages:
    8,211
    Likes Received:
    3,952
    Had to upload a pic. ;)



    SmalFishingBoat.jpg
  6. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2005
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    120
    Interesting. The boat looks odd to my Alaskan eyes. I looks like it's probably a seiner. But around here the boom and hold are usually on the stern not the prow. I assume that's the prow to the right. The boom looks to me like it's gong the wrong way. I'm not sure how the seine net would be deployed or pulled in. And I'm not sure where the bridge/wheel house is located. Okay judging by the funnels, the left side is the prow but that makes for a weird looking stern. This probably has to do with regional differences in boat design. I looked up photos of the original. It looks as if the wheelhouse/bridge is in the part sticking up in the middle. In the photos the boom isn't shown going over the roof of the bridge. The prow is to the right. I'm still not sure what they did with the boom. The shrouds seem to be in the way.
    Thanks for sharing. I had a good time looking at boats.
    Cybergrinder likes this.
  7. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Messages:
    8,211
    Likes Received:
    3,952
    These were small cargo boats, and they were deployed in war time, that's why they have machine guns on them. The boom is really to help stop roll more than anything else. it's also a crane, to mount goods into the Hold, the boom arm can go almost vertical, the Hold is just below the boom. These boats had a very deep keep, which made them seaworthy. 2/3'ds of the boat is underwater. In reality, the shroud was probably a bit more forward, but not by much, next do a dock, that boom extended pretty far out, once tied, with multiple pulleys, they could put the "goods" in however they needed to, as long as it they through the hold opening. Much smuggling was done in boats like these. Too small to be bothered. To small to be of much use once commercial Hauling was safe, many were converted into pleasure craft, of if steel, broken up for scrap. ;)
    Cybergrinder likes this.
  8. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2005
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    120
    The seiners around here have the boom(crane) going the other way, forward of the hold and both are aft of the deckhouse. The boom has a big pinch block which pulls in the net. The difference must be that the boom on the MFV was used to load and unload cargo, and the boom on a seiner is to pull in the seine net. Also cargo loading and unloading on the MFV would be done in the the calm waters of a port. With the seiners this this might be done while on high seas, thus the advantage putting hold, boom, and work area on the back where it's more protected instead of the front of the boat. This might also be part of how the wheelhouse/bridge of boats at one time as at the stern, because that's were you steer from. In modern times the bridge/wheelhouse is in the front, more like on a car or aircraft for better visibility.
    I"m not sure how many seiners are being used for smuggling. If I did know then Coast Guard would know as well.
  9. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Messages:
    8,211
    Likes Received:
    3,952
    I doubt any of these old cargo boats exist. They were from the WWII era. A lot survived to be used in the Mediterranean, but I imagine they are all gone by now. Could you imagine trying to handle something like that on the high seas, with the Pilot house in the back!! I have sailed 10 meter sailing boats, which are piloted from the rear cockpit, but since you are completely exposed, and the decks are so low, it's a different experience, than from what I have sailed.

    My sailboat experience came on a Pearson 10 Meter (33' feet x 12'6" Beam, with a 6'foot 9"inch solid lead fin keel) she could be was quite a handful, as not having a full keel, you always were making sure she was on course, of course, this ship really could sail closed hauled into the wind, more than many others I have sailed. The telltales always tell you what the sail is doing.. This boat hand a 50 foot mast, 150 Genoa , with roller furling, and a fully battened mainsail (Marconi rigged), 3/8th Mainstays, with chainplates anchored to the keel, a true full displacement blue water boat. It slept 6 people, quite crudely, but comfortable. We had a huge Blooper sail for it too, for downwind runs. :)

    The pics below show the Hull line and the last one is how she looked on the water (not the exact boat, same model). 5 years of great sailing sometimes thrilling, fun.

    People used to ask me if flying was safer than sailing. I always felt that things happened fast in planes, you got into trouble quick, but could get out quick. With ships like these, you could be beyond hope before you realized it, and there were things in the water that could eat you when you finally sunk. Nothing in the air to eat you, and you always had a chance to make a powerless safe landing.. Not so with these boats, if they got full of water, they sunk, and not very slowly either. I had close calls in both, got air and sea sick, though when sick in the air, you have to swallow whatever comes up, gross, but true, the alternative is even worse. :)

    10 Meter Pearson.jpg 6363107_2Pearson 10 Meter side.jpg Spittin Image.jpg
    lizzienewell likes this.
  10. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2005
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    120
    Nice boat pics. Thanks for sharing.
    zathros likes this.
  11. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Messages:
    8,211
    Likes Received:
    3,952