Section edging??!!

Discussion in 'Aircraft & Aviation' started by Bowdenja, Sep 29, 2004.

  1. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    OK here's a newbie question, and I'm posting it here because I'm mostly doing plane models right now.

    How do y'all that are doing these GREAT LOOKING models handle connecting the sections together? Do you cut out all of the jaggies like on the FG models, or do you convert these to the way NOBI does his, each section has a seperate connecting piece that is cut out and glued on?

    I've bought a FG CD some kits from Merek and Kancho, and downloaded some from Nobi and just about anywhere I could find them to start learning this hobby. And they all have different ways of joining the sections together. Is there one best way of doing this or do I just need to practice a lot more and learn all of the different ways. I am going to practice a lot more anyway :D

    Thanks

    john
  2. Texman

    Texman Guest

    Howdy John,

    I do exactly as you suggested. I remove the "connecting" strips
    attached to any model, and replace it with a seperate connecting
    strip. This allows me to a) color the strip to help hide the joint,
    and b) after edge coloring the parts, this allows a 'butt joint'
    to be made with these parts, eliminating the overlap effect.

    Welcome to the gang and feel free to ask any questions ya may
    come up with. We're a pretty forgiving bunch.

    Ray
  3. cecil_severs

    cecil_severs Member

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    This topic was covered recently in the "Tips and Techniques" forum under :Getting the perfect fit":

    http://www.cardmodels.net/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=540

    Scroll down aways and you'll see a great photo tutuorial on this subject. I highly recommend this forum to list newbies since many topics have been covered here in great detail. In fact I refer to it often myself.

    Cecil
  4. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hello Ron, come in Ron, are you there Ron, Over,

    Maybe it's time to put that particular post into the article section...,

    Best regards, Gil
  5. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    Ray -
    Thanks for your input I'm glad I was kinda on the right way of thinking.

    Cecil -
    I called myself looking and I guess not very well. That was an EXCELLENT tutoral link. I will mark it to keep me in line on the correct and best looking way to do this.

    This place is the best!

    I already found out that I'm doing way too many things wrong.

    First - out go the scissors..........got to find my X-acto knife and blades.

    Second - from other posts I'm learning that y'all use ALOT of different types of glues.

    Third - I need to try and find me a better place to work on this.........if I just can talk the wife into it.

    Thanks guys for your input.

    Maybe one day I can post a picture.....right now none of my models are worthy of wasting the batteries of my camera! Maybe one day.
  6. Darwin

    Darwin Member

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    Don't be too quick throwing out the scissors....get the right pair (like Fiscars microtip) and they do about everything an exacto knife can do, and with just as much control of the cut. If you really get into the hobby, your toolbox will probably have a half-dozen different pairs of scissors (is a single one a siz?) and at least as many different types of hobby knives....plus a guillotine-type paper cutter or two. Just adopt my signature line....
  7. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    Thanks Darwin!

    It seems that there are many right ways to do this and achieve a great looking model.

    So a better grade of scissors(s) will go into the box, I already have a large paper cutter, my dog leaves the room every time I use it. Guess it sounds like finger nails on a chalk board to her.

    Anyway Thanks to everybody for answering thjis newbies question!

    I going to try this technique on Nobi's A-36 Apache and I hope it turns out at least half as good as Rob's.

    I must check out that thread again before I start cutting paper. Thanks again everbody!

    john
  8. John Griffin

    John Griffin Member

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    I use good scissors (I think they're called shears?) for almost all of my cuts- except for perfectly straight cuts and small 'holes'. I find Elmer's Glue-All (not 'school-glue) works great. I squeeze out a spot to dab at with an applicator toothpick... and sitting out in the air like that it gets nice and tacky.
  9. John Griffin

    John Griffin Member

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    I use good scissors (I think they're called shears?) for almost all of my cuts- except for perfectly straight cuts and small 'holes'. I find Elmer's Glue-All (not 'school-glue) works great. I squeeze out a spot to dab at with an applicator toothpick... and sitting out in the air like that it gets nice and tacky.
  10. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    Hi John,
    #1, you are not doing ANYTHING wrong!!! Some of the MOST BRILLIANT craftsmen break ALL the rules. Not that we have any rules. Whatever you are comfortable with is right for you.
    Tiny scissors are just about all I use anymore, except for inside diameters where I will pull out my trusty x-acto. When I figure out my new camera I will take pics of some indisputeable examples of what can be cut, how small, and how accurate. I would edit Darwin's post with one thing, "with a more COMPLETE control of the cut".
    On edging, I like all suggestions. My methods for edging involve clamping with pliars, this squeezes the two parts to make a "spot weld" and it lessens the appearance of thickness, which can easily be hidden.
    One more thing...
    Though this method is difficult, I frequently use NO tabs at all! Just butt joint the parts and hold (for what seems like hours), the edges of cardstock accept glue and hold nicely without seams and there's no fiddling with that third piece.
  11. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    Hi John,
    #1, you are not doing ANYTHING wrong!!! Some of the MOST BRILLIANT craftsmen break ALL the rules. Not that we have any rules. Whatever you are comfortable with is right for you.
    Tiny scissors are just about all I use anymore, except for inside diameters where I will pull out my trusty x-acto. When I figure out my new camera I will take pics of some indisputeable examples of what can be cut, how small, and how accurate. I would edit Darwin's post with one thing, "with a more COMPLETE control of the cut".
    On edging, I like all suggestions. My methods for edging involve clamping with pliars, this squeezes the two parts to make a "spot weld" and it lessens the appearance of thickness, which can easily be hidden.
    One more thing...
    Though this method is difficult, I frequently use NO tabs at all! Just butt joint the parts and hold (for what seems like hours), the edges of cardstock accept glue and hold nicely without seams and there's no fiddling with that third piece.
  12. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

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    Err I don't do either. I took my working methods from a book by Dyson about building kayaks and baidarkas. I build a frame--traditionally this would be made of wood--and then I cover it with a skin--traditionally a walrus skin. Dyson builds his baidarkas with an aluminum frame and a nylon fabric skin.
    With paper, stitching tends to tear and the scale is off so I use superglue instead. My seams overlap enough to put the glue on and don't have tabs.
    When I do fabric skin, I use baseball stitch. My seams are curved like the seams on a baseball, this allows a flat skin to follow a curve.
    Paper is quite similar to leather. I'm tempted to try tooling it.
  13. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

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    Err I don't do either. I took my working methods from a book by Dyson about building kayaks and baidarkas. I build a frame--traditionally this would be made of wood--and then I cover it with a skin--traditionally a walrus skin. Dyson builds his baidarkas with an aluminum frame and a nylon fabric skin.
    With paper, stitching tends to tear and the scale is off so I use superglue instead. My seams overlap enough to put the glue on and don't have tabs.
    When I do fabric skin, I use baseball stitch. My seams are curved like the seams on a baseball, this allows a flat skin to follow a curve.
    Paper is quite similar to leather. I'm tempted to try tooling it.
  14. Ken Horne

    Ken Horne Member

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    Man, this thread is moveing along a bit since John started it a couple of years ago.

    I, like everyone else, do a few different things, but I'd like to add a comment about no strip or tabs at all. I learned this one from the Digital Navy models. It makes a lot of sense with ship models to avoid any tabs etc because the pieces are so danged small. There really is no need for them and the little boxes etc go together cleaner without.

    I've been playing around with Locktite CA gel for this very purpose and I love it so far. It works fine edge to edge and in a T butt joint sans tabs. I haven't modeled anything much with it yet, but what I played with I have been very happy. I have never liked CAs 'cause they are so thin that they wick into the paper causing dark spots in the ink. Even the thick ones do a bit. The gel doesn't seem to, so I am going to give it a try.

    And Lizzie, about "tooling" the paper, I have done that crudely, again as I suspect most of us have, with wet fingers pinching say a cowling or nose cone into shape. You really can get more than a series of truncated cones. I suspect that if you tried more seriously to tool it, much more organic shapes could be coaxed out of our humble card :)

    Take care all,

    Kenny
  15. Ken Horne

    Ken Horne Member

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    Man, this thread is moveing along a bit since John started it a couple of years ago.

    I, like everyone else, do a few different things, but I'd like to add a comment about no strip or tabs at all. I learned this one from the Digital Navy models. It makes a lot of sense with ship models to avoid any tabs etc because the pieces are so danged small. There really is no need for them and the little boxes etc go together cleaner without.

    I've been playing around with Locktite CA gel for this very purpose and I love it so far. It works fine edge to edge and in a T butt joint sans tabs. I haven't modeled anything much with it yet, but what I played with I have been very happy. I have never liked CAs 'cause they are so thin that they wick into the paper causing dark spots in the ink. Even the thick ones do a bit. The gel doesn't seem to, so I am going to give it a try.

    And Lizzie, about "tooling" the paper, I have done that crudely, again as I suspect most of us have, with wet fingers pinching say a cowling or nose cone into shape. You really can get more than a series of truncated cones. I suspect that if you tried more seriously to tool it, much more organic shapes could be coaxed out of our humble card :)

    Take care all,

    Kenny
  16. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    I was wondering why you called yourself a "newbie"! I should have read the dates...damn...I hear the voices in MY head now ...Dummy, dummy, dummy...
  17. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    I was wondering why you called yourself a "newbie"! I should have read the dates...damn...I hear the voices in MY head now ...Dummy, dummy, dummy...