Scratchbuilt Grahame-White Type VII, 1/48th Scale

Discussion in 'Aircraft & Aviation' started by EricGoedkoop, Mar 16, 2006.

  1. Bengt F

    Bengt F Active Member

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    Early Birds

    Hi jasco,

    Yes, the Demoiselle is a beautiful little bird, indeed!
    The world´s first true 'ultra-light' airplane, for the home-builder. However, the seating arrangement wasn´t exactly the most comfortable; directly under the gas tank & engine and behind the whirling propeller blades... one wonders if the pilot got oil and grease in his face?
    I just found a nice book in my library that I´d almost forgotten about: EARLY BIRDS - An informal account of the beginnings of aviation by John Halpern, published by E. P. Dutton, New York, in 1981 ($20.95).
    There are some fine pictures in the book of the late Cole Palen´s flying red Demoiselle replica at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome. There are also some fine pictures of Hanriot, Curtiss Model D and Blériot XI aeroplanes.
    Popular aeroplanes all over Europe, Blériot XIs were even built in New York in 1911 - with parts supplied from the American Airplane Supply Co. of Hempstead, New York. One fine picture from the Silver Hill Museum, Silver Hill, Md, shows a complete cockpit interior of the museum´s Blériot XI with fuel tank, controls and pilot´s seat, through a plexi-glass side panel!
    Another museum exhibit is a XI built by students of the Calgary Institute, Canada, displayed at the Movieland of the Air Museum, at Orange County Airport, California.

    A book recommended to all Magnificent Men and Ladies!
    Bengt:roll:

    PS. (Edited in) This post was supposed to appear under the "Those magnificent men in their flying machines" thread - sorry about the confusion. B.

    Added 2006-04-06:
    The (present, white) Demoiselle at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome:
    http://www.oldrhinebeck.org/collection/airplanes/Demoiselle.htm#Demoiselle
    And the Long Island-built 'cross-country' Blériot XI from 1911:
    http://www.oldrhinebeck.org/collection/airplanes/Bleriot XI X-country.htm
    And, with apologies for the terrible moiré effect, the picture from the book (ref. above) of the Blériot´s cockpit, through the plexi-glass:
    [​IMG]
    Enjoy!
    Bengt:grin:
  2. Bengt F

    Bengt F Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2005
    Messages:
    1,106
    Likes Received:
    0
    Early Birds

    Hi jasco,

    Yes, the Demoiselle is a beautiful little bird, indeed!
    The world´s first true 'ultra-light' airplane, for the home-builder. However, the seating arrangement wasn´t exactly the most comfortable; directly under the gas tank & engine and behind the whirling propeller blades... one wonders if the pilot got oil and grease in his face?
    I just found a nice book in my library that I´d almost forgotten about: EARLY BIRDS - An informal account of the beginnings of aviation by John Halpern, published by E. P. Dutton, New York, in 1981 ($20.95).
    There are some fine pictures in the book of the late Cole Palen´s flying red Demoiselle replica at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome. There are also some fine pictures of Hanriot, Curtiss Model D and Blériot XI aeroplanes.
    Popular aeroplanes all over Europe, Blériot XIs were even built in New York in 1911 - with parts supplied from the American Airplane Supply Co. of Hempstead, New York. One fine picture from the Silver Hill Museum, Silver Hill, Md, shows a complete cockpit interior of the museum´s Blériot XI with fuel tank, controls and pilot´s seat, through a plexi-glass side panel!
    Another museum exhibit is a XI built by students of the Calgary Institute, Canada, displayed at the Movieland of the Air Museum, at Orange County Airport, California.

    A book recommended to all Magnificent Men and Ladies!
    Bengt:roll:

    PS. (Edited in) This post was supposed to appear under the "Those magnificent men in their flying machines" thread - sorry about the confusion. B.

    Added 2006-04-06:
    The (present, white) Demoiselle at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome:
    http://www.oldrhinebeck.org/collection/airplanes/Demoiselle.htm#Demoiselle
    And the Long Island-built 'cross-country' Blériot XI from 1911:
    http://www.oldrhinebeck.org/collection/airplanes/Bleriot XI X-country.htm
    And, with apologies for the terrible moiré effect, the picture from the book (ref. above) of the Blériot´s cockpit, through the plexi-glass:
    [​IMG]
    Enjoy!
    Bengt:grin: