ScannerJOE's TOS Enterprise NCC-1701

Discussion in 'Internet Finds' started by Revell-Fan, Jul 2, 2016.

  1. Revell-Fan

    Revell-Fan Co-Administrator Administrator

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  2. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator

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    That's really colorful. :)
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  3. Ron Caudillo

    Ron Caudillo Creative Advisory Consultant Moderator

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    Very nice model design! I like that the Alan Sinclair drawings were referenced same as my TOS Enterprise.

    Best Regards,
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  4. Revell-Fan

    Revell-Fan Co-Administrator Administrator

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    One of the drawbacks is, it does not come with an internal skeleton. The builder will have to make it him-/ herself if necessary. :)
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  5. Cybergrinder

    Cybergrinder Member Extraordinaire

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    @Revell-Fan , therein lies the challenge ;) (memories of my DS9 Defiant :))
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  6. spaceagent-9

    spaceagent-9 Right Hand Man and Confidant

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    what I found in my build is that the paper I used messed up the saucer. I also tried to use Elmer's glue. the nacelles, struts and sec hull and dish and neck all turned out very well.
    its a good size [ron's resize is exellent] but when I went to put the saucer sections together, the paper warped, and they didn't fit together at all. I suggest that you make a spool like support ofr the saucer, H shaped on its side, and then anchor in the below parts from the sensor dome out, and then fold them as you glue . use strips instead of tabs. then, use a full strip around the inside rim O. now you will need to cut to fit the pie wedge section as you fold and bent them to fit under the bridge piece, which also needs to be under stripped instead of tabs. you will have a nice saucer with tassles in the upper middle where they meet, just top that over with the carefully trimmed and built bridge and it should turn out nice. mine how ever was a disaster. but I finished it off to learn from it and threw it away.
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  7. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator

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    Internal supports are important on models like this, but not hard to make. With a ruler, make each part, measure, for the body, for instance, the diameter, the make a circle, add some triangles, and do a couple of dry fits. You repeat the same procedure. Remember, if you measure the outside diameter, just subtract the thickness of the paper (twice), and make a box to fit in there. A ring of boxes will give the saucer section much support. Even if the box is tapered, this method works. It does not matter if the box is flat on the ends, only the thickness, you won't be seeing them anywhere.
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  8. spaceagent-9

    spaceagent-9 Right Hand Man and Confidant

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    what I am finding lately is that spongy foam makes a good support, usually you don't even need to mess with the model itself much, however, im also thinking of the water molding method, but completely lack the skills due to inexperience. paper machete unique starship builds and dinosaur, lantern fish, maybe a few futuristic cars are strongly pulling at me.
  9. THE DC

    THE DC Member

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    Good tip!


  10. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator

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    As long as you leave much room for the foam to expand, this is a great method. I did use one brand once that left a chemical stain on the "finished" side of the model, I can't remember which Brand though I did get it from Home Depot. :)
  11. spaceagent-9

    spaceagent-9 Right Hand Man and Confidant

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    I was meaning like ripping a pillow from the dumpster apart and using the foam from inside it kind. I have searched high and low for the tan colored micro-bubble foam chunks but cant find it anywhere. I think its called furniture foam.
  12. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator

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    Oh. Problem with that is it doesn't really give support of the kind you wish. If you stuff a model with it, it will exert outward pressure and warp the model. If you use the exact amount, it will not prevent the model form warping, as it does not stay rigid.

    I make my own sofa's, and know where to buy all manner of densities. Fortunately, a local furniture restorer sells me the stuff at just enough to cover here cost. The Spray can foam is the stuff you want, as that becomes extremely rigid. I have construction foam, used for making wings for real fiberglass aircraft. This stuff is hard as a rock, and you either use a hot wire, and /or a grinder, block sander, to make the shape. You then cover the shape with the fiberglass, or carbon fiber, to add the tensile strength, the foam adds the rigidity. Since the foam will not bend, and the fiberglass/carbon fiber, will not stretch. This combination makes for composite aircraft with wings stronger than steel. You can buy this foam as a mix, or in different sizes, already solid. Furniture foam is probably the worst thing for supporting a paper models structure, it will warp with the model. :)