scanner issues

Discussion in 'Software' started by Ron, Apr 4, 2004.

  1. Ron

    Ron Member

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    Hi Tim and friends :)

    I have an Agfa Snapscan 1212U flatbed scanner. It's been a bit of a nightmare getting scans to be accurate and sharp. Is there any way to get this thing to work well with 3rd party software such as Vuescan
    or is it just ready for the scrap heap? Any reccomendations on new or older models that are ideal for scanning? I'm in the process of scanning the latest Halinski Fw-190 before I go to town on it. Is it maybe that the detail is just too fine?

    talk to you soon

    Ron
  2. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Ron,

    Sounds like it's been dropped. Flatbed scanners are notorous for being delicate. I usaully buy scanners from companies that also have been involved with cameras such as Canon. I don't know if there are are any generic drivers out there for the unit you've got. Have you tried a Google search on the subject? Unfortunately it may be time for a new one.

    Best regards, Gil

    P.S. I'm shopping for a new printer now!
  3. Ron

    Ron Member

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    I think your're right Gil. This one's ready to be added to the ever growing pile of 'neat!! I'll take it apart one day' stuff. The little Epson C64 prints like a charm. What printer are you leaning towards?

    Ron
  4. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    After looking around the selection has narrowed to the Canon i560 and the Epson C64 (edit: meant C84). The Epson has the best print resolution.

    An interesting note is that print speed seems to be an overidding sales point for the people selling printers with resolution being ill defined in terms of "looked more real" or "reallly stood out". Psychopictorics at it's best.

    Anyone up to compiling a printer test pattern or better yet know of one we could use as a standard for washing the bull out of the marketing claims?

    Best regards, Gil
  5. Ashrunner

    Ashrunner Member

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  6. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

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    Hi Ron, I had an Epson 740 and recently replaced it with an Epson C82, both of which were cheaper when I bought them as newer models had recently been released; It sometimes pays to be just behind the razor edge of technology! The main reason for buying these was the ability to print on HEAVY stock, both taking card up to 1mm thick. Because the paper path only goes through about 30 degrees, and the rollers will handle this sort of material, I have never had any problems getting ink onto heavy card. And the picture image is very good, although nowadays most printers are OK. The new Durabrite Epson inks are also supposed to be very light-tight, ie won't fade, although this might take a while to asess!
    Print times are nothing to get steamed up over unless you are printing a book or 50! If/when I get a new printer, I'll stick with Epson, but maybe go for an A3 version like the 1295. And that one can take 1.5mm stock!

    Scanners? Mine is 5 years old, a Mustek, don't even know if they are still in business! Still works fine, but it does sound like yours has been knocked, Ron. Time to think about buying yourself a new toy.....

    Tim
  7. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    I was reading reviews of the Epson printers on ZDNet. One of the major complaints was of the print head clooging up over time.

    The HP style replaces the inkjets with the cartridge so if you have a problem replacng the cartridge cleans up the problem (I've resorted to soaking them in alcohol to loosen up dried ink).

    The Epsons resolution is still very attractive to a card modeler. Any comments by the sworn and true?

    Best regards, Gil
  8. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

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    I had no clogging problems with the 740, but this C82 did clog a bit, but then I decided to only switch it on when I needed a print, and also print something at least once every 2 or 3 days. This seems to have kept it clean, over 4 sets of cartridges. The last set I used were 'compatables' rather than Epson items, and I got these via Marcus' Wings of Horus site link. A lot cheaper than originals and so far, just as good otherwise.

    Tim
  9. rowiac

    rowiac Member

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    I just replaced my 4+ year-old Epson Photo 750 printer with a Canon i960 (US$175 on Amazon.com). The Epson was a great printer except for the clogging of the print head that Epsons seem to suffer from. Unless I used it on a constant basis, I ended up with clogs due to dried ink and I wasted a lot of ink running cleaning cycles. The newer Epsons may be better, but it seems like the print head technology is pretty much the same now as it was then, except for higher dpi being available.

    Since I like to print photos as well as paper models, I chose the i960 since it's a true photo printer with 6 color inks each with an individual tank. If you don't need the color accuracy of 6-color inks, then the Canon i860 might be a good choice for $50 less. Either of these printers has 4800X1200dpi capability, compared to 5760X1440 on the new Epsons, which is probably not a noticeable difference. With the Canon, though, you can actually use the highest resolution setting without it taking forever to print, unlike my old 1440X720 dpi Epson.

    The Canon printer really is fast compared to my old Epson, and it's quiet. I haven't run 1mm stock through it yet, but it handles 110lb card stock fine. Although Canons aren't free from clogging problems, if that does happen to me the print head is easily removed for manual cleaning, unlike Epson printers.

    I don't mean to totally bad mouth Epson; in fact, I was going to buy an Epson Photo 960 until I discovered they discontinued it at the end of the year. Epson doesn't make a comparable printer now for a reasonable price. So that's why I ended up with the Canon (and for less money!), and so far I'm very happy with it.

    Regarding scanners, I gave away my old POS Mustek last year and replaced it with an Epson scanner. The resolution is higher and the color fidelity is much better. Mustek stopped supporting my old scanner and I couldn't get drivers for Win2000 or XP, so I got rid of it. My advice is to buy a scanner from a well-known company such as Epson, Canon or HP so that you will have a better chance of driver support over time.

    Sorry for the long winded reply, but hopefully it's useful for someone.

    Roger
  10. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Tim, Roger,

    Thanks for the reply. Each company has their 15 miniutes of the "hot product" at which time they quit listening to the cutsomer for some reason.

    I believe that the Epson and I would not get along so I guess I'll have to consider the Canon model. Have to check to see if the Costco generic refill pack covers them.

    Best regards, Gil
  11. rowiac

    rowiac Member

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    Gil,

    Regarding generic refill kits for inkjet printers, after all the mess and trouble I had with refilling my old printer, I've decided to buy generic cartridges instead. These are available for about US$3 each online compared to Canon or Epson brand for $10-$12.

    The downside is that the generic inks supposedly do not last as long before fading, but for even the OEM inks to last you need to use the proper (read expensive) photo paper.

    If you still want to refill your cartridges, there are many bulk inks available online and there are even continuous ink systems for Epsons and Canons if you really do a lot of printing. Another advantage for the Canon is that refilling the cartridges is a little easier than for Epsons based on the refill procedures I've seen.

    Regards,
    Roger
  12. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

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    The ones I use are made by Jettec and they seem fine. www.jettec.com , via a link on Marcus' Wings of Horus site. I guess he gets a commission on the sales! Good for him, I say....

    Tim